Special Issue "Sustainable Territorial Management"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. David Rodríguez-Rodríguez

1. Institute of Economy, Geography and Demography, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Calle de Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid, Spain
2. European Topic Centre-University of Malaga, Calle Arquitecto Francisco Peñalosa s/n, Ampliación Campus Teatinos, 29010 Malaga, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability indicators; protected area effectiveness evaluation; territorial planning; socioeconomic effects of public policies
Guest Editor
Dr. Javier Martínez-Vega

Institute of Economy, Geography and Demography, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Calle de Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: land use-land cover changes; scenarios; wildland fires–human risks; protected areas; sustainability indicators; territorial planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent human development has made a notable social and economic progress for most of us possible; however, it has also had a range of negative consequences on natural resources, local communities, and the economy at multiple scales. Soil sealing, erosion and loss, land degradation, air and water pollution, biodiversity homogenisation and loss, poverty, human migration, and health issues are among the most common human-made impacts with a clear sustainability and spatial component. They occur in territories, be it terrestrial, aerial, or marine, which are the physical bases for whichever activity is being performed by any living being. Thus, achieving sustainable territorial management, which combines healthy and prosperous societies with the long-term maintenance of a rich biodiversity and productive ecosystem services, remains the biggest challenge to our modern world. This Special Issue seeks to collect a coherent set of studies on techniques and experiences (case studies) aimed at increasing the environmental, social, economic, and/or institutional sustainability of landscapes and seascapes from a range of geographic and socioeconomic contexts.

Dr. David Rodríguez-Rodríguez
Dr. Javier Martínez-Vega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable development
  • Territorial planning
  • Land use-land cover
  • Protected area
  • Biodiversity
  • Maritime planning
  • Integrated coastal zone management
  • Socioeconomy
  • Governance

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Vulnerability of Coastal Beach Tourism to Flooding: A Case Study of Galicia, Spain
Environments 2017, 4(4), 83; doi:10.3390/environments4040083
Received: 27 September 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 11 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
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Abstract
Flooding, as a result of heavy rains and/or storm surges, is a persistent problem in coastal areas. Under scenarios of climate change, there are expectations that flooding events will become more frequent in some areas and potentially more intense. This poses a potential
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Flooding, as a result of heavy rains and/or storm surges, is a persistent problem in coastal areas. Under scenarios of climate change, there are expectations that flooding events will become more frequent in some areas and potentially more intense. This poses a potential threat to coastal communities relying heavily on coastal resources, such as beaches for tourism. This paper develops a methodology for the assessment of coastal flooding risks, based on an index that compares 16 hydrogeomorphological, biophysical, human exposure and resilience indicators, with a specific focus on tourism. The paper then uses an existing flood vulnerability assessment of 724 beaches in Galicia (Spain) to test the index for tourism. Results indicate that approximately 10% of tourism beaches are at high risk to flooding, including 10 urban and 36 rural beaches. Implications for adaptation and coastal management are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Territorial Management)
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Open AccessArticle Testing Extended Accounts in Scheduled Conservation of Open Woodlands with Permanent Livestock Grazing: Dehesa de la Luz Estate Case Study, Arroyo de la Luz, Spain
Environments 2017, 4(4), 82; doi:10.3390/environments4040082
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 28 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
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Abstract
Standard Economic Accounts for Agriculture and Forestry do not measure the ecosystem services and intermediate products embedded in the final products recorded, and omit the private non-commercial intermediate products and self-consumption of private amenities. These limitations of the standard accounts are addressed by
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Standard Economic Accounts for Agriculture and Forestry do not measure the ecosystem services and intermediate products embedded in the final products recorded, and omit the private non-commercial intermediate products and self-consumption of private amenities. These limitations of the standard accounts are addressed by the extended Agroforestry Accounting System, which is being tested at the publicly-owned Dehesa de la Luz agroforestry estate. The extended accounts simulate conservation forestry of holm oak and cork oak for the current as well as successive rotation cycles during which scheduled conservation of the cultural woodland landscape of the Dehesa de la Luz is carried out, improving the natural physical growth of the firewood and cork. The estimated results for 2014 reveal that private ecosystem services make up 50% of the firewood and grazing products consumed; the private environmental income accounts for 13% of the total private income; and the private environmental asset represents 53% of the total opening capital. The net value added is more than 2.3 times the amount estimated using the standard accounts. The landowner donates intermediate products of non-commercial services at a value of 85 €/ha, which are used to enhance the supply of public products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Territorial Management)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing Land Use-Cover Changes and Modelling Change Scenarios in Two Mountain Spanish National Parks
Environments 2017, 4(4), 79; doi:10.3390/environments4040079
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 1 November 2017 / Accepted: 4 November 2017 / Published: 7 November 2017
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Abstract
Land Use-Cover Changes (LUCCs) are one of the main problems for the preservation of biodiversity. Protected Areas (PAs) do not escape this threat. Some processes, such as intensive recreational use, forest fires or the expansion of artificial areas taking place inside and around
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Land Use-Cover Changes (LUCCs) are one of the main problems for the preservation of biodiversity. Protected Areas (PAs) do not escape this threat. Some processes, such as intensive recreational use, forest fires or the expansion of artificial areas taking place inside and around them in response to their appeal, question their environmental sustainability and their efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the LUCCs that took place between 1990 and 2006 in two National Parks (NPs) belonging to the Spanish network and in their surroundings: Ordesa and Monte Perdido (Ordesa NP) and Sierra de Guadarrama (Guadarrama NP). We also simulate land use changes between 2006 and 2030 by means of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), taking into account two scenarios: trend and green. Finally, we perform a multi-temporal analysis of natural habitat fragmentation in each NP. The results show that the NPs analyzed are well-preserved and have seen hardly any significant LUCCs inside them. However, Socioeconomic Influence Zones (SIZs) and buffers are subject to different dynamics. In the SIZ and buffer of the Ordesa NP, there has been an expansion of built-up areas (annual rate of change = +1.19) around small urban hubs and ski resorts. There has also been a gradual recovery of natural areas, which had been interrupted by forest fires. The invasion of sub-alpine grasslands by shrubs is clear (+2735 ha). The SIZ and buffer of the Guadarrama NP are subject to urban sprawl in forest areas and to the construction of road infrastructures (+5549 ha and an annual rate of change = +1.20). Industrial area has multiplied by 3.3 in 20 years. The consequences are an increase in the Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI), greater risk of forest fires and greater fragmentation of natural habitats (+0.04 in SIZ). In the change scenarios, if conditions change as expected, the specific threats facing each NP can be expected to increase. There are substantial differences between the scenarios depending on whether or not incentives are accepted and legal restrictions are respected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Territorial Management)
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Open AccessArticle Rapid Urban Growth in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Monitoring Land Use Land Cover Dynamics of a Himalayan City with Landsat Imageries
Environments 2017, 4(4), 72; doi:10.3390/environments4040072
Received: 11 September 2017 / Revised: 3 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 October 2017 / Published: 8 October 2017
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Abstract
The Kathmandu Valley of Nepal epitomizes the growing urbanization trend spreading across the Himalayan foothills. This metropolitan valley has experienced a significant transformation of its landscapes in the last four decades resulting in substantial land use and land cover (LULC) change; however, no
[...] Read more.
The Kathmandu Valley of Nepal epitomizes the growing urbanization trend spreading across the Himalayan foothills. This metropolitan valley has experienced a significant transformation of its landscapes in the last four decades resulting in substantial land use and land cover (LULC) change; however, no major systematic analysis of the urbanization trend and LULC has been conducted on this valley since 2000. When considering the importance of using LULC change as a window to study the broader changes in socio-ecological systems of this valley, our study first detected LULC change trajectories of this valley using four Landsat images of the year 1989, 1999, 2009, and 2016, and then analyzed the detected change in the light of a set of proximate causes and factors driving those changes. A pixel-based hybrid classification (unsupervised followed by supervised) approach was employed to classify these images into five LULC categories and analyze the LULC trajectories detected from them. Our results show that urban area expanded up to 412% in last three decades and the most of this expansion occurred with the conversions of 31% agricultural land. The majority of the urban expansion happened during 1989–2009, and it is still growing along the major roads in a concentric pattern, significantly altering the cityscape of the valley. The centrality feature of Kathmandu valley and the massive surge in rural-to-urban migration are identified as the primary proximate causes of the fast expansion of built-up areas and rapid conversions of agricultural areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Territorial Management)
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Open AccessArticle Fine-Tuning of a Protected Area Effectiveness Evaluation Tool: Implementation on Two Emblematic Spanish National Parks
Environments 2017, 4(4), 68; doi:10.3390/environments4040068
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 21 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
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Abstract
As global biodiversity trends worsen, protected area (PA) environmental effectiveness needs to be assessed to identify strengths and areas to improve. Through a participatory process including PA managers and scientists, we refined the System for the Integrated Assessment of Protected Areas (SIAPA), in
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As global biodiversity trends worsen, protected area (PA) environmental effectiveness needs to be assessed to identify strengths and areas to improve. Through a participatory process including PA managers and scientists, we refined the System for the Integrated Assessment of Protected Areas (SIAPA), in order to increase its legitimacy, credibility and salience to end users in Spain. Then, we tested the optimised version of the SIAPA on two emblematic Spanish national parks (NPs): Ordesa y Monte Perdido NP (Ordesa NP) and Sierra de Guadarrama NP (Guadarrama NP). PA managers and scientists largely coincided in the ratings of SIAPA’s indicators and indices. Collaboration with Ordesa NP’s managers was regular, allowing a nearly complete evaluation of the NP. However, greater collaboration between PA managers and scientists remains a priority in Guadarrama NP. Results show that potential effectiveness is moderate for Ordesa NP and low for Guadarrama NP, according to the indicators that could be evaluated. For Ordesa NP, lack of data on focal habitats and other focal features determined a deficient valuation of its conservation state, although the remaining indicators in that category showed adequate or moderate values. The compilation of those data should be overriding in the NP. In contrast, only climate change posed a serious threat in that NP. The social perception and valuation of both NPs was good, suggesting broad support from local populations and eased management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Territorial Management)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Including Farmers in Landscape Rural Strategy Making. Experiences Gained from a Multifunctional Danish Landscape
Authors: David Qvist Pears ¹, Jørgen Primdahl ¹,* and Esben Munk Sørensen ²
Affiliation: ¹ Landscape & Planning, Department of Geoscience and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, 1165 København, Denmark; Email: jpr@ign.ku.dk,² Land Management & Geoinformatics, Department of Planning, Aalborg University, 9100 Aalborg, Denmark
Abstract: New integrative and inclusive approaches to landscape planning have been called for by public agencies and commentators of rural development and landscape policy. In Denmark, a framework for landscape strategy making has been applied to a number of rural landscapes. Based on experiences from a three year project for a multifunctional coastal landscape we analyse and discuss pathways and obstacles landscape strategy making. Besides better conditions for agriculture, development perspectives for rural housing, outdoor recreation and nature conservation were explicitly included in the goals of the project. Focusing on the farmers’ different motivations and interests, we present detailed analyses of their involvement in the process and the outcomes in the form of a landscape strategy three years after the first meeting.  We close the paper by reflections on potentials and limitations of landscape strategy making as a new territorial approach to guiding rural change.

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