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Special Issue "Information Theory in Neuroscience"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Theory".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Stefano Panzeri

Neural Computation Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems@UniTn, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rovereto (TN) 38068, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neural coding; information theory; population coding; temporal coding
Guest Editor
Dr. Eugenio Piasini

Computational Neuroscience Initiative, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: information processing in complex systems; neural coding; structure-function relationships in neural networks; normative models of neural function; perceptual decision-making; neuroinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the ultimate information processing device, the brain naturally lends itself to be studied with information theory. Application of information theory to neuroscience has spurred the development of principled theories of brain function, has led to advances in the study of consciousness, and to the development of analytical techniques to crack the neural code, that is to unveil the language used by neurons to encode and process information. In particular, advances in experimental techniques enabling precise recording and manipulation of neural activity on a large scale now enable for the first time the precise formulation and the quantitative test of hypotheses about how the brain encodes and transmits across areas the information used for specific functions.

This Special Issue emphasizes contributions on novel approaches in neuroscience using information theory, and on the development of new information theoretic results inspired by problems in neuroscience. Research work at the interface of neuroscience, Information Theory and other disciplines is also welcome.

Prof. Stefano Panzeri
Dr. Eugenio Piasini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • population coding
  • redundancy
  • synergy
  • optimal codes
  • directed information
  • integrated information theory
  • neural decoders

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Lifespan Development of the Human Brain Revealed by Large-Scale Network Eigen-Entropy
Entropy 2017, 19(9), 471; doi:10.3390/e19090471
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 25 August 2017 / Accepted: 1 September 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
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Abstract
Imaging connectomics based on graph theory has become an effective and unique methodological framework for studying functional connectivity patterns of the developing and aging brain. Normal brain development is characterized by continuous and significant network evolution through infancy, childhood, and adolescence, following specific
[...] Read more.
Imaging connectomics based on graph theory has become an effective and unique methodological framework for studying functional connectivity patterns of the developing and aging brain. Normal brain development is characterized by continuous and significant network evolution through infancy, childhood, and adolescence, following specific maturational patterns. Normal aging is related to some resting state brain networks disruption, which are associated with certain cognitive decline. It is a big challenge to design an integral metric to track connectome evolution patterns across the lifespan, which is to understand the principles of network organization in the human brain. In this study, we first defined a brain network eigen-entropy (NEE) based on the energy probability (EP) of each brain node. Next, we used the NEE to characterize the lifespan orderness trajectory of the whole-brain functional connectivity of 173 healthy individuals ranging in age from 7 to 85 years. The results revealed that during the lifespan, the whole-brain NEE exhibited a significant non-linear decrease and that the EP distribution shifted from concentration to wide dispersion, implying orderness enhancement of functional connectome over age. Furthermore, brain regions with significant EP changes from the flourishing (7–20 years) to the youth period (23–38 years) were mainly located in the right prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia, and were involved in emotion regulation and executive function in coordination with the action of the sensory system, implying that self-awareness and voluntary control performance significantly changed during neurodevelopment. However, the changes from the youth period to middle age (40–59 years) were located in the mesial temporal lobe and caudate, which are associated with long-term memory, implying that the memory of the human brain begins to decline with age during this period. Overall, the findings suggested that the human connectome shifted from a relatively anatomical driven state to an orderly organized state with lower entropy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Information Theory in Neuroscience)
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Open AccessArticle Life on the Edge: Latching Dynamics in a Potts Neural Network
Entropy 2017, 19(9), 468; doi:10.3390/e19090468
Received: 2 August 2017 / Revised: 25 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 3 September 2017
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Abstract
We study latching dynamics in the adaptive Potts model network, through numerical simulations with randomly and also weakly correlated patterns, and we focus on comparing its slowly and fast adapting regimes. A measure, Q, is used to quantify the quality of latching
[...] Read more.
We study latching dynamics in the adaptive Potts model network, through numerical simulations with randomly and also weakly correlated patterns, and we focus on comparing its slowly and fast adapting regimes. A measure, Q, is used to quantify the quality of latching in the phase space spanned by the number of Potts states S, the number of connections per Potts unit C and the number of stored memory patterns p. We find narrow regions, or bands in phase space, where distinct pattern retrieval and duration of latching combine to yield the highest values of Q. The bands are confined by the storage capacity curve, for large p, and by the onset of finite latching, for low p. Inside the band, in the slowly adapting regime, we observe complex structured dynamics, with transitions at high crossover between correlated memory patterns; while away from the band latching, transitions lose complexity in different ways: below, they are clear-cut but last such few steps as to span a transition matrix between states with few asymmetrical entries and limited entropy; while above, they tend to become random, with large entropy and bi-directional transition frequencies, but indistinguishable from noise. Extrapolating from the simulations, the band appears to scale almost quadratically in the pS plane, and sublinearly in pC. In the fast adapting regime, the band scales similarly, and it can be made even wider and more robust, but transitions between anti-correlated patterns dominate latching dynamics. This suggest that slow and fast adaptation have to be integrated in a scenario for viable latching in a cortical system. The results for the slowly adapting regime, obtained with randomly correlated patterns, remain valid also for the case with correlated patterns, with just a simple shift in phase space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Information Theory in Neuroscience)
Figures

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