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Special Issue "Entropy and Friction Volume 2"

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A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Michael Nosonovsky

Department of Mechanical Engineering, EMS Building, Room E371G, College of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413, USA
Fax: +1 414 229 6958
Interests: nanotribology; multiscale mechanisms of dissipation; capillary; instabilities; biotribology; contact mechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Friction is a dissipative process; therefore, the growth of entropy is an immanent feature of friction. Despite that, the concept of entropy is still rarely used in tribology (the science of friction, wear and lubrication). Recent investigations have shown that the concept of entropy can be successfully applied in order to combine dry friction with surface degradation (wear) into a single framework. Furthermore, the entropy analysis for surface self-organization has proven to be a very effective method for many engineering applications. The entropy method allows scientists to bridge the gap between biological and engineering surfaces and to develop self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning surfaces that mimic nature.

Papers that deal with any aspect of entropy during friction are welcome, including (but not limited to) the thermodynamics of friction, friction in biological systems, biomimetic self-healing and self-lubrication surfaces, fiction-induced vibrations and secondary structures, tribochemistry, physical chemistry of surfaces, etc.

Michael Nosonovsky, Ph. D.
Guest Editor

Submission

All manuscripts should be submitted to entropy@mdpi.com with a copy to the Guest Editor. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this Open Access journal is 1000 CHF per accepted paper.

Keywords

  • friction
  • physical chemistry of surfaces
  • biomimetic surfaces
  • self-healing surfaces
  • frictional dynamic instabilities

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Entropy Content During Nanometric Stick-Slip Motion
Entropy 2014, 16(6), 3062-3073; doi:10.3390/e16063062
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 27 May 2014 / Accepted: 27 May 2014 / Published: 3 June 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (313 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To explore the existence of self-organization during friction, this paper considers the motion of all atoms in a systems consisting of an Atomic Force Microscope metal tip sliding on a metal slab. The tip and the slab are set in relative motion [...] Read more.
To explore the existence of self-organization during friction, this paper considers the motion of all atoms in a systems consisting of an Atomic Force Microscope metal tip sliding on a metal slab. The tip and the slab are set in relative motion with constant velocity. The vibrations of individual atoms with respect to that relative motion are obtained explicitly using Molecular Dynamics with Embedded Atom Method potentials. First, we obtain signatures of Self Organized Criticality in that the stick-slip jump force probability densities are power laws with exponents in the range (0.5, 1.5) for aluminum and copper. Second, we characterize the dynamical attractor by the entropy content of the overall atomic jittering. We find that in all cases, friction minimizes the entropy and thus makes a strong case for self-organization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics
Entropy 2010, 12(8), 1885-1901; doi:10.3390/e12081885
Received: 30 June 2010 / Accepted: 6 August 2010 / Published: 9 August 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (278 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal [...] Read more.
Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Thermodynamical Description of Running Discontinuities: Application to Friction and Wear
Entropy 2010, 12(6), 1418-1439; doi:10.3390/e12061418
Received: 30 March 2010 / Revised: 21 May 2010 / Accepted: 31 May 2010 / Published: 1 June 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (159 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The friction and wear phenomena appear due to contact and relative motion between two solids. The evolution of contact conditions depends on loading conditions and mechanical behaviours. The wear phenomena are essentially characterized by a matter loss. Wear and friction are in [...] Read more.
The friction and wear phenomena appear due to contact and relative motion between two solids. The evolution of contact conditions depends on loading conditions and mechanical behaviours. The wear phenomena are essentially characterized by a matter loss. Wear and friction are in interaction due to the fact that particles are detached from the solids. A complex medium appears as an interface having a strong effect on the friction condition. The purpose of this paper is to describe such phenomena taking account of different scales of modelization in order to derive some macroscopic laws. A thermodynamical approach is proposed and models of wear are analysed in this framework where the separation between the dissipation due to friction and that due to wear is made. Applications on different cases are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Entropy in Tribology: in the Search for Applications
Entropy 2010, 12(6), 1345-1390; doi:10.3390/e12061345
Received: 30 March 2010 / Revised: 26 April 2010 / Accepted: 8 May 2010 / Published: 28 May 2010
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (964 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper discusses the concept of entropy as applied to friction and wear. Friction and wear are classical examples of irreversible dissipative processes, and it is widely recognized that entropy generation is their important quantitative measure. On the other hand, the use [...] Read more.
The paper discusses the concept of entropy as applied to friction and wear. Friction and wear are classical examples of irreversible dissipative processes, and it is widely recognized that entropy generation is their important quantitative measure. On the other hand, the use of thermodynamic methods in tribology remains controversial and questions about the practical usefulness of these methods are often asked. A significant part of entropic tribological research was conducted in Russia since the 1970s. Surprisingly, many of these studies are not available in English and still not well known in the West. The paper reviews various views on the role of entropy and self-organization in tribology and it discusses modern approaches to wear and friction, which use the thermodynamic entropic method as well as the application of the mathematical concept of entropy to the dynamic friction effects (e.g., the running-in transient process, stick-slip motion, etc.) and a possible connection between the thermodynamic and information approach. The paper also discusses non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to friction, wear, and self-healing. In general, the objective of this paper is to answer the frequently asked question “is there any practical application of the thermodynamics in the study of friction and wear?” and to show that the thermodynamic methods have potential for both fundamental study of friction and wear and for the development of new (e.g., self-lubricating) materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Turing Systems, Entropy, and Kinetic Models for Self-Healing Surfaces
Entropy 2010, 12(3), 554-569; doi:10.3390/e12030554
Received: 30 January 2010 / Revised: 15 February 2010 / Accepted: 16 February 2010 / Published: 15 March 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (328 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper addresses the methods of description of friction-induced self-healing at the interface between two solid bodies. A macroscopic description of self-healing is based on a Turing system for the transfer of matter that leads to self-organization at the interface in the [...] Read more.
The paper addresses the methods of description of friction-induced self-healing at the interface between two solid bodies. A macroscopic description of self-healing is based on a Turing system for the transfer of matter that leads to self-organization at the interface in the case of an unstable state. A microscopic description deals with a kinetic model of the process and entropy production during self-organization. The paper provides a brief overview of the Turing system approach and statistical kinetic models. The relation between these methods and the description of the self-healing surfaces is discussed, as well as results of their application. The analytical considerations are illustrated by numerical simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Negentropy Generation and Fractality in the Dry Friction of Polished Surfaces
Entropy 2010, 12(3), 480-489; doi:10.3390/e12030480
Received: 29 January 2010 / Revised: 24 February 2010 / Accepted: 8 March 2010 / Published: 11 March 2010
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (870 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We consider the Robin Hood model of dry friction to study entropy transfer during sliding. For the polished surface (steady state) we study the probability distribution of slips and find an exponential behavior for all the physically relevant asperity interaction-distance thresholds. In [...] Read more.
We consider the Robin Hood model of dry friction to study entropy transfer during sliding. For the polished surface (steady state) we study the probability distribution of slips and find an exponential behavior for all the physically relevant asperity interaction-distance thresholds. In addition, we characterize the time evolution of the sample by its spatial fractal dimension and by its entropy content. Starting from an unpolished surface, the entropy decreases during the Robin Hood process, until it reaches a plateau; thereafter the system fluctuates above the critical height. This validates the notion that friction increases information in the neighborhood of the contacting surface at the expense of losing information in remote regions. We explain the practical relevance of these results for engineering surface processing such as honing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)
Open AccessArticle Self-Organization during Friction in Complex Surface Engineered Tribosystems
Entropy 2010, 12(2), 275-288; doi:10.3390/e12020275
Received: 15 October 2009 / Revised: 5 January 2010 / Accepted: 23 February 2010 / Published: 25 February 2010
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (523 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Self-organization during friction in complex surface engineered tribosystems is investigated. The probability of self-organization in these complex tribosystems is studied on the basis of the theoretical concepts of irreversible thermodynamics. It is shown that a higher number of interrelated processes within the [...] Read more.
Self-organization during friction in complex surface engineered tribosystems is investigated. The probability of self-organization in these complex tribosystems is studied on the basis of the theoretical concepts of irreversible thermodynamics. It is shown that a higher number of interrelated processes within the system result in an increased probability of self-organization. The results of this thermodynamic model are confirmed by the investigation of the wear performance of a novel Ti0.2Al0.55Cr0.2Si0.03Y0.02N/Ti0.25Al0.65Cr0.1N (PVD) coating with complex nano-multilayered structure under extreme tribological conditions of dry high-speed end milling of hardened H13 tool steel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview On the Thermodynamics of Friction and Wear―A Review
Entropy 2010, 12(5), 1021-1049; doi:10.3390/e12051021
Received: 17 March 2010 / Revised: 18 April 2010 / Accepted: 19 April 2010 / Published: 27 April 2010
Cited by 44 | PDF Full-text (612 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract An extensive survey of the papers pertaining to the thermodynamic approach to tribosystems, particularly using the concept of entropy as a natural time base, is presented with a summary of the important contributions of leading researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy and Friction Volume 2)

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