Special Issue "The Role of Education and Health in Economic Development"

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A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nishith Prakash (Website)

Department of Economics, Human Rights Institute University of Connecticut, 365 Fairfield Way, Oak Hall, Room 331, Storrs, CT 06269-1063, USA
Fax: +1 860 486 4463
Interests: economics of education; health economics; public policy; program evaluation; field experiments
Guest Editor
Dr. Edward C. Hoang (Website)

Department of Economics, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA
Interests: macroeconomics; macroeconomic policy analysis; public economics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Arnab K. Basu (Website)

Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
Fax: +1 607 255 9984
Interests: development economics; labor economics; international economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome submissions of papers in all areas of development economics with an emphasis on exploring the impact of education and health on economic development. Specific topics include but are not limited to: AIDS, climate, conditional transfers, cultural legacies, disease, dropout, economic growth, education, foreign investment, gender gaps, geography, health, historical legacies, human capital development, impact evaluation, incentives, income, infrastructure, labor policies that promote productive employment, macroeconomic management, malaria, mortality, perceived returns to education, poverty, and protection against the effects of environmental shocks, randomized controlled trial, schooling, student resources, teacher training, technology, trade, and water.

Dr. Nishith Prakash
Dr. Edward C. Hoang
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • Conditional transfers
  • school access
  • gender gaps
  • education
  • incentives
  • dropout
  • perceived returns to education
  • poverty
  • development
  • technology
  • impact evaluation
  • teacher training
  • student resources
  • randomized controlled trial
  • AIDS
  • mortality
  • malaria
  • health
  • water
  • disease
  • income
  • schooling
  • economic growth

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Catastrophic Economic Consequences of Healthcare Payments: Effects on Poverty Estimates in Egypt, Jordan, and Palestine
Economies 2015, 3(4), 216-234; doi:10.3390/economies3040216
Received: 26 August 2015 / Revised: 15 November 2015 / Accepted: 25 November 2015 / Published: 26 November 2015
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Abstract
Healthcare payments could drive households with no health insurance coverage into financial catastrophe, which might lead them to cut spending on necessities, sell assets, or use credit. In extreme cases, healthcare payments could have devastating consequences on the household economic status that [...] Read more.
Healthcare payments could drive households with no health insurance coverage into financial catastrophe, which might lead them to cut spending on necessities, sell assets, or use credit. In extreme cases, healthcare payments could have devastating consequences on the household economic status that would push them into extreme poverty. Using nationally representative surveys from three Arab countries, namely, Egypt, Jordan, and Palestine, this paper examines the incidence, intensity and distribution of catastrophic health payments, and assesses the poverty impact of out-of-pocket health payments (OOP). The OOP for healthcare were considered catastrophic if it exceeded 10% of a household’s total expenditure or 40% of non-food expenditure. The poverty impact was evaluated using poverty head counts and poverty gaps before and after OOP. Results show that OOP exacerbate households’ living severely in Egypt, pushing more than one-fifth of the population into a financial catastrophe and 3% into extreme poverty in 2011. However, in Jordan and Palestine, the disruptive impact of OOP remains modest over time. In the three countries, the catastrophic health payment is the problem of the better off households. Poverty alleviation policies should help reduce the reliance on OOP to finance healthcare. Moving toward universal health coverage could also be a promising option to protect households from the catastrophic economic consequences of health care payments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Education and Health in Economic Development)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Education on Conflict Intensity in Africa
Economies 2015, 3(4), 161-185; doi:10.3390/economies3040161
Received: 2 August 2015 / Revised: 24 September 2015 / Accepted: 30 September 2015 / Published: 9 October 2015
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Abstract
This study investigates the impact of different schooling dimensions (primary, secondary and tertiary) on the intensity of intra-state conflicts in 25 African states during the period 1989–2008. It uses fixed-effects and Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM) estimators in an annualized panel data [...] Read more.
This study investigates the impact of different schooling dimensions (primary, secondary and tertiary) on the intensity of intra-state conflicts in 25 African states during the period 1989–2008. It uses fixed-effects and Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM) estimators in an annualized panel data framework. Parameter estimates suggest the following (1) primary schooling broadly mitigates conflicts in Africa. However, in environments with high natural resource rents, it could ignite conflicts; (2) there is evidence, although not overwhelming, that secondary schooling potentially drives conflicts in Africa. There is also evidence that urbanization potentially drives conflicts in Africa. However, although secondary schooling and urbanization potentially drives conflicts, in environments where secondary schooling (urbanization) is high, urbanization (secondary schooling) mitigates conflicts; (3) there is no evidence of a strong direct positive impact of tertiary education on conflicts and conditioning on tertiary schooling, income inequality potentially drives conflicts in African states. However, in contexts where income inequality (tertiary schooling) is high, tertiary schooling (inequality) mitigates conflict. Two important policy implications follow from this study. First, in contexts where income inequality is high (for instance, in South Africa), governments should strive to foster tertiary education in order to reduce conflict. Second, where urbanization rates are high, they should foster both secondary and tertiary education. This study contributes to existing knowledge by clearly demonstrating the utility of distinguishing between different educational dimensions and the contexts wherein they matter for conflict mitigation in Africa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Education and Health in Economic Development)
Open AccessArticle Access to Media and HIV Knowledge in India
Economies 2014, 2(2), 124-146; doi:10.3390/economies2020124
Received: 25 October 2013 / Revised: 22 April 2014 / Accepted: 9 June 2014 / Published: 18 June 2014
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Abstract
This paper aims to better understand the relationship between HIV knowledge and media exposure in India. We use a two-stage hurdle model to estimate the effect of media sources such as newspapers, radios and television on AIDS-related knowledge among Indian men and [...] Read more.
This paper aims to better understand the relationship between HIV knowledge and media exposure in India. We use a two-stage hurdle model to estimate the effect of media sources such as newspapers, radios and television on AIDS-related knowledge among Indian men and women using demographic health survey data. Overall, access to newspapers, radio, or television increases the likelihood of better HIV knowledge in both males and females by an order between 2% and 12%. These findings, albeit quantitatively small, suggest, even if indirectly, possible problems faced by AIDS campaigns and government programs in combating the HIV epidemic in India. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Education and Health in Economic Development)
Open AccessArticle Internet Education and Economic Growth: Evidence from Cross-Country Regressions
Economies 2014, 2(1), 78-94; doi:10.3390/economies2010078
Received: 26 September 2013 / Revised: 31 December 2013 / Accepted: 20 February 2014 / Published: 20 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (391 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of Internet education on economic growth are examined using a cross-section of 36 high-income countries. Internet usage rates are employed as a proxy for Internet education across countries. Regression results show that the frequent usage of the Internet has a [...] Read more.
The effects of Internet education on economic growth are examined using a cross-section of 36 high-income countries. Internet usage rates are employed as a proxy for Internet education across countries. Regression results show that the frequent usage of the Internet has a positive and significant effect on economic growth. The estimated growth effect of Internet skills is also found to be greater than the growth effect of math and science skills. The results are, in general, robust across model specifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Education and Health in Economic Development)

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