Special Issue "Metal Halide Perovskite Crystals: Growth Techniques, Properties and Emerging Applications"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Wei Zhang

Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: photovoltaics; perovskites; semicondutors; optoelectronic devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a rising star among various semiconductor materials in the past few years owing to their low cost, solution processability and fascinating combination of material properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion length, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Accompanied by the success in photovoltaic community that has witnessed a certified power conversion efficiency of 22.1% through a few years’ efforts, the rapid advancement is also achieved in the areas of light-emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, and solar-to-fuel energy conversion devices. Beyond the dominant format of polycrystalline perovskite thin films for solar cell applications, recent progress in metal halide perovskite crystals, ranging from nanocrystals, nanowires to macroscopic single-crystals, has spurred paramount scientific and industrial interests. Great research efforts have endeavored to develop new techniques for crystal growth, investigate the physical and chemical properties of the materials and explore their emerging applications. The perovskite single crystals, for instance, provide an excellent platform to characterize a range of materials’ properties that could not be achieved by studying polycrystalline thin films. Understanding the mechanism of the crystal growth provides insights for the better control of polycrystalline thin film quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect density, the key facts that restrict the solar cell performance. Perovskite nanocrystals and nanowires exhibit superior luminescent performance than their thin film counterparts, enabling potential applications like large area display. These exciting achievements call for a rationalization of the different forms of perovskite semiconductors beyond the widely used polycrystalline thin films. In the current Special Issue: “Metal Halide Perovskite Crystals: Growth Techniques, Properties and Emerging Applications”, we aim to provide a forum for the discussion and presentation of recent advances in the fields of research related to metal halide perovskite crystals. The potential topics of interest could be, but are not limited to:

  • Growth techniques of metal halide perovskite single crystals, nanowire and nanocystals
  • Mechanism of crystal growth
  • Characterization of metal halide perovskite crystals
  • Emerging applications of metal halide perovskite crystals

Scientists working in this broad field, and many other aspects related to perovskite crystals but not summarized here, are invited to present their work in this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Wei Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metal halide perovskites
  • Single crystals, nanocrystals, nanowires, nanorods
  • Semiconductors
  • Photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, optical and optoelectronic devices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle CH3NH3Cl Assisted Solvent Engineering for Highly Crystallized and Large Grain Size Mixed-Composition (FAPbI3)0.85(MAPbBr3)0.15 Perovskites
Crystals 2017, 7(9), 272; doi:10.3390/cryst7090272
Received: 17 July 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 2 September 2017 / Published: 5 September 2017
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Abstract
High-quality mixed-cation lead mixed-halide (FAPbI3)0.85(MAPbBr3)0.15 perovskite films have been prepared using CH3NH3Cl additives via the solvent engineering method. The UV/Vis result shows that the addition of additives leads to enhanced absorptions. XRD
[...] Read more.
High-quality mixed-cation lead mixed-halide (FAPbI3)0.85(MAPbBr3)0.15 perovskite films have been prepared using CH3NH3Cl additives via the solvent engineering method. The UV/Vis result shows that the addition of additives leads to enhanced absorptions. XRD and SEM characterizations suggest that compact, pinhole-free and uniform films can be obtained. This is attributable to the crystallization improvement caused by the CH3NH3Cl additives. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the F-doped SnO2 (FTO)/compact-TiO2/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Ag device increases from 15.3% to 16.8% with the help of CH3NH3Cl additive. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Interfacial Kinetics of Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells
Crystals 2017, 7(8), 252; doi:10.3390/cryst7080252
Received: 9 June 2017 / Revised: 30 July 2017 / Accepted: 3 August 2017 / Published: 13 August 2017
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Abstract
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have immense potential for high power conversion efficiency with an ease of fabrication procedure. The fundamental understanding of interfacial kinetics in PSCs is crucial for further improving of their photovoltaic performance. Herein we use the current-voltage (J-V)
[...] Read more.
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have immense potential for high power conversion efficiency with an ease of fabrication procedure. The fundamental understanding of interfacial kinetics in PSCs is crucial for further improving of their photovoltaic performance. Herein we use the current-voltage (J-V) characteristics and impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements to probe the interfacial kinetics on efficient MAPbI3 solar cells. We show that series resistance (RS) of PSCs exhibits an ohmic and non-ohmic behavior that causes a significant voltage drop across it. The Nyquist spectra as a function of applied bias reveal the characteristic features of ion motion and accumulation that is mainly associated with the MA cations in MAPbI3. With these findings, we provide an efficient way to understand the working mechanism of perovskite solar cells. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Anti-Solvent Crystallization Strategies for Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells
Crystals 2017, 7(10), 291; doi:10.3390/cryst7100291
Received: 3 September 2017 / Revised: 25 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
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Abstract
Solution-processed organic-inorganic halide perovskites are currently established as the hottest area of interest in the world of photovoltaics, ensuring low manufacturing cost and high conversion efficiencies. Even though various fabrication/deposition approaches and device architectures have been tested, researchers quickly realized that the key
[...] Read more.
Solution-processed organic-inorganic halide perovskites are currently established as the hottest area of interest in the world of photovoltaics, ensuring low manufacturing cost and high conversion efficiencies. Even though various fabrication/deposition approaches and device architectures have been tested, researchers quickly realized that the key for the excellent solar cell operation was the quality of the crystallization of the perovskite film, employed to assure efficient photogeneration of carriers, charge separation and transport of the separated carriers at the contacts. One of the most typical methods in chemistry to crystallize a material is anti-solvent precipitation. Indeed, this classical precipitation method worked really well for the growth of single crystals of perovskite. Fortunately, the method was also effective for the preparation of perovskite films by adopting an anti-solvent dripping technique during spin-coating the perovskite precursor solution on the substrate. With this, polycrystalline perovskite films with pure and stable crystal phases accompanied with excellent surface coverage were prepared, leading to highly reproducible efficiencies close to 22%. In this review, we discuss recent results on highly efficient solar cells, obtained by the anti-solvent dripping method, always in the presence of Lewis base adducts of lead(II) iodide. We present all the anti-solvents that can be used and what is the impact of them on device efficiencies. Finally, we analyze the critical challenges that currently limit the efficacy/reproducibility of this crystallization method and propose prospects for future directions. Full article
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