Special Issue "Crystallisation Control"

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A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Sharon Jane Cooper

Department of Chemistry, University Science Laboratories, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crystal growth; nucleation; crystallization in confined volumes; polymorphic control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crystallisation is a vital process during the production of solid materials in many industrial and biological applications. Controlling the size, shape and polymorph of the crystals can be crucial in determining the properties of the materials that result. Crystallisation used to be considered rather a black art – scratch the glass sides of your reaction vessel and your organic crystals might ‘magically’ appear. Nowadays, however, scientists are often able to manipulate crystallisation processes with increasing reliability and sophistication to achieve their desired outcome. The advances in controlling crystallisation reflect our increasing understanding of the fundamental nucleation and crystal growth processes involved, though there are still gaps in our understanding that limit a full predictive capability. This special issue focuses on advances in any aspect of controlling crystallisation on any class of material, with the aim of highlighting the diversity of methods that can be used.

Dr. Sharon Jane Cooper
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • nucleation
  • crystal growth
  • polymorphism
  • cocrystals
  • crystallisation in confined volumes
  • crystallisation using ultrasound
  • laser-induced crystallisation
  • continuous crystallisation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle From Evaporative to Cooling Crystallisation: An Initial Co-Crystallisation Study of Cytosine and Its Fluorinated Derivative with 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic Acid
Crystals 2014, 4(2), 123-140; doi:10.3390/cryst4020123
Received: 20 December 2013 / Revised: 21 May 2014 / Accepted: 29 May 2014 / Published: 11 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1043 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two new multi-component molecular complexes of cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine with 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid are presented. Materials synthesis was achieved initially by evaporative crystallisation and the crystal structures determined. The process was then successfully transferred into a controlled small scale cooling crystallisation environment, with bulk
[...] Read more.
Two new multi-component molecular complexes of cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine with 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid are presented. Materials synthesis was achieved initially by evaporative crystallisation and the crystal structures determined. The process was then successfully transferred into a controlled small scale cooling crystallisation environment, with bulk samples shown to be representative of the multi-component product phase, by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Turbidity measurements are shown to be a valuable process analytical technology probe for characterising the initial stages of molecular complex formation in solution. The significance of these findings for scale-up of crystallisation of multi-component molecular materials and for future transfer into continuous cooling crystallisation is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystallisation Control)
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