Special Issue "Development of Photocatalytic Processes for Air Pollution Remediation and Fuels Production"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michela Signoretto

Department of Molecular Sciences and Nano Systems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, and INSTM Consortium, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy
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Interests: photocatalysts design for fuel production; development of catalysts and processes for the production of fine chemicals and fuels from biomass; design of dermo-cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulates; formulation of multifunctional materials for bio-building applications; catalytic production of hydrogen from biomass; development of heterogeneous catalysts and their use in industrial chemistry
Guest Editor
Dr. Alberto Olivo

Department of Molecular Sciences and Nano Systems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, and INSTM Consortium, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: photocatalysis; nanomaterials formulation; sustainable processes; air quality remediation; solar fuels production

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In addressing the most pressing issues of the 21st century, namely environmental pollution remediation and alternative fuel production, photocatalysis represents a powerful technology to exploit light radiation to obtain strategic products for the economies of today and tomorrow. There is a wide range of possible approaches that can be pursued, either organic or inorganic pollutant oxidation for air quality remediation or solar fuel production from waste biomass or CO2-rich flue gases. Within heterogeneous photocatalysis, the most promising, yet challenging, strategy is to design materials for specific processes, the possible great potential has not yet been achieved yet.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide insight on cutting edge photocatalytic technologies, focusing on the most important on innovative solutions for efficient photocatalytic pollutant abatement and fuel production. Photocatalysts, the key component of this technology, and process design need to be designed according to each reaction’s specific needs, finding the best way to solve them.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Michela Signoretto
Dr. Alberto Olivo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Photocatalysis
  • Environmental remediation
  • Gas phase reactions
  • Solar fuels
  • Catalyst formulation
  • Photocatalytic process design
  • Liquid phase reactions
  • NOx removal
  • VOCs abatement

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Enhancing Light-Driven Production of Hydrogen Peroxide by Anchoring Au onto C3N4 Catalysts
Catalysts 2018, 8(4), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8040147
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 31 March 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
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Abstract
Light-driven production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a green and sustainable way to achieve solar-to-chemical energy conversion. During such a conversion, both the high activity and the stability of catalysts were critical. We prepared an Au-supported C3N
[...] Read more.
Light-driven production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a green and sustainable way to achieve solar-to-chemical energy conversion. During such a conversion, both the high activity and the stability of catalysts were critical. We prepared an Au-supported C3N4 catalyst—i.e., Au/C3N4-500(N2)—by strongly anchoring Au nanoparticles (~5 nm) onto a C3N4 matrix—which simultaneously enhanced the activity towards the photosynthesis of H2O2 and the stability when it was reused. The yield of H2O2 reached 1320 μmol L−1 on Au/C3N4-500(N2) after 4 h of light irradiation in an acidic solution (pH 3), which was higher than that (1067 μmol L−1) of the control sample Au/C3N4-500(Air) and 2.3 times higher than that of the pristine C3N4. Particularly, the catalyst Au/C3N4-500(N2) retained a much higher stability. The yield of H2O2 had a marginal decrease on the spent catalyst—i.e., 98% yield was kept. In comparison, only 70% yield was obtained from the spent control catalyst. The robust anchoring of Au onto C3N4 improved their interaction, which remarkably decreased the Au leaching when it was used and avoided the aggregation and aging of Au particles. Minimal Au leaching was detected on the spent catalyst. The kinetic analyses indicated that the highest formation rate of H2O2 was achieved on the Au/C3N4-500(N2) catalyst. The decomposition tests and kinetic behaviors of H2O2 were also carried out. These findings suggested that the formation rate of H2O2 could be a determining factor for efficient production of H2O2. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Sustainable Carbon Dioxide Photoreduction by a Cooperative Effect of Reactor Design and Titania Metal Promotion
Catalysts 2018, 8(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8010041
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 9 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 22 January 2018
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Abstract
An effective process based on the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to face on the one hand, the crucial problem of environmental pollution, and, on the other hand, to propose an efficient way to product clean and sustainable energy sources has been developed
[...] Read more.
An effective process based on the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to face on the one hand, the crucial problem of environmental pollution, and, on the other hand, to propose an efficient way to product clean and sustainable energy sources has been developed in this work. Particular attention has been paid to the sustainability of the process by using a green reductant (water) and TiO2 as a photocatalyst under very mild operative conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure). It was shown that the efficiency in carbon dioxide photoreduction is strictly related to the process parameters and to the catalyst features. In order to formulate a versatile and high performing catalyst, TiO2 was modified by oxide or metal species. Copper (in the oxide CuO form) or gold (as nanoparticles) were employed as promoting metal. Both photocatalytic activity and selectivity displayed by CuO-TiO2 and Au-TiO2 were compared, and it was found that the nature of the promoter (either Au or CuO) shifts the selectivity of the process towards two strategic products: CH4 or H2. The catalytic results were discussed in depth and correlated with the physicochemical features of the photocatalysts. Full article
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Graphical abstract

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