Special Issue "Photocatalysts for Organics Degradation"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Barbara Bonelli

Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Turin, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanoporous catalysts; physical-chemistry; heterogeneous catalysis; dyes degradation; Advanced Oxidation Processes
Guest Editor
Dr. Maela Manzoli

Department of Drug Science and Technology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 9, 10125 Torino, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Morphological and spectroscopic characterization of heterogeneous catalysts
Guest Editor
Dr. Francesca S. Freyria

Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and characterization of heterostructured nanocrystals
Guest Editor
Dr. Serena Esposito

Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino andSouthern Lazio, Via G. Di Biasio 43, Cassino, FR, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Sol-gel synthesis of porous inorganic system; thin film by dip-coating, metal-ceramic composite from zeolite precursors, heterogeneous catalysis, pesticides adsorption for water remediation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Issue is devoted to papers concerning the synthesis, the physico-chemical properties and the performance of photo-catalysts for the degradation of organic pollutants. Research papers, reviews and perspectives dealing with the photo-catalytic degradation of most common organic pollutants (dyes, pesticides, herbicides, etc.) are welcome, as well as papers dealing with the removal of emerging ones, like drugs and their metabolites. Authors are encouraged to enlighten several aspects, including the synthesis of novel photocatalysts (hybrid materials, quantum dots, colloidal nanoparticles, doped mesostructured materials, etc..), the optimization of processes utilizing state-of-art photocatalysts and the influence of the physico-chemical properties of the photocatalyst on its final performance. Since one of the main issues related to the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants is their actual mineralization as well as the formation of by-products that can be per se harmful, a number of papers dealing with the correct determination of mineralization as with the detection of such by-products is expected.

Prof. Dr. Barbara Bonelli
Dr. Maela Manzoli
Dr. Francesca S. Freyria
Dr. Serena Esposito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel synthesis of photocatalysts
  • Water remediation
  • Organic pollutants degradation
  • Harmful by-products
  • Advanced Oxidation processes
  • Physico-chemical properties of photocatalysts
  • Fenton, Fenton-like and photo-Fenton processes
  • Scale-up of photocatalytic processes
  • Detection of degradation products
  • Mineralization/Decoloration

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Low-Temperature Sol-Gel Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Anatase/Brookite Biphasic Nanoparticles with High Surface Area and Visible-Light Performance
Catalysts 2017, 7(12), 376; doi:10.3390/catal7120376
Received: 21 October 2017 / Revised: 26 November 2017 / Accepted: 30 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
PDF Full-text (2832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nitrogen doping in combination with the brookite phase or a mixture of TiO2 polymorphs nanomaterials can enhance photocatalytic activity under visible light. Generally, nitrogen-dopedanatase/brookite mixed phases TiO2 nanoparticles obtained by hydrothermal or solvothermal method need to be at high temperature and
[...] Read more.
Nitrogen doping in combination with the brookite phase or a mixture of TiO2 polymorphs nanomaterials can enhance photocatalytic activity under visible light. Generally, nitrogen-dopedanatase/brookite mixed phases TiO2 nanoparticles obtained by hydrothermal or solvothermal method need to be at high temperature and with long time heating treatment. Furthermore, the surface areas of them are low (<125 m2/g). There is hardly a report on the simple and direct preparation of N-doped anatase/brookite mixed phase TiO2 nanostructures using sol-gel method at low heating temperature. In this paper, the nitrogen-doped anatase/brookite biphasic nanoparticles with large surface area (240 m2/g) were successfully prepared using sol-gel method at low temperature (165 °C), and with short heating time (4 h) under autogenous pressure. The obtained sample without subsequent annealing at elevated temperatures showed enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) with 4.2-, 9.6-, and 7.5-fold visible light activities compared to P25 and the amorphous samples heated in muffle furnace with air or in tube furnace with a flow of nitrogen at 165 °C, respectively. This result was attributed to the synergistic effects of nitrogen doping, mixed crystalline phases, and high surface area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photocatalysts for Organics Degradation)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma
Catalysts 2017, 7(12), 362; doi:10.3390/catal7120362
Received: 26 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 27 November 2017
PDF Full-text (7763 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to
[...] Read more.
Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, and the intermediate products between gas and liquid phase before and after treatment were investigated. The results showed that DBD plasma could maintain the efficient adsorption performance of resins while degrading the indigo carmine adsorbed by resins. The degradation rate of indigo carmine reached 88% and the regeneration efficiency (RE) can be maintained above 85% after multi-successive regeneration cycles. The indigo carmine contaminants were decomposed by a variety of reactive radicals leading to fracture of exocyclic C=C bond, which could cause decoloration of dye solution. Based on above results, a possible degradation pathway for the indigo carmine by resin adsorption/DBD plasma treatment was proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photocatalysts for Organics Degradation)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top