Special Issue "Carbon Catalysts"

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A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Seong-Ho Yoon

Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Elena Pastor

Dpto. Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Laguna, C/Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez s/n. E-38071. La Laguna. Tenerife, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrocatalysis and carbon supported catalysts for applications in electrochemical devices
Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Jesús Lázaro

Institute of Carbochemistry, CSIC-Spanish National Research Council, C/. Miguel Luesma Castán, 4, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
E-Mail
Phone: 34976733977
Interests: carbon materials; catalyts; fuel cell; hydrogen; carbon catalysts; NO Reduction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon catalysts have been used over the last decades for the utilization in several processes. Carbon catalysts consists of metals or metallic compounds supported on carbon materials which role is not only to maintain the catalytic phase in a well dispersed state but also affect the catalytic activity, by means of direct participation in nay of the steps of the reaction mechanism, or by favouring the interaction between active phase and support.

Carbon materials fulfil the properties desirable in a catalyst support such as inertness, towards unwanted reaction, stability, mechanical properties, surface area and porosity, the possibility of being manufacture in different physical form.

This special issue invites significant contributions of different applications of carbon catalyst such as in electrochemical devices, reduction of emissions, in the production of valuable products and in other applications.

Prof. Dr. Seong-Ho Yoon
Prof. Dr. Elena Pastor
Dr. Maria Jesús Lázaro
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Formic Acid Oxidation over Hierarchical Porous Carbon Containing PtPd Catalysts
Catalysts 2013, 3(4), 902-913; doi:10.3390/catal3040902
Received: 24 August 2013 / Revised: 15 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of high surface monolithic carbon as support for catalysts offers important advantage, such as elimination of the ohmic drop originated in the interparticle contact and improved mass transport by ad-hoc pore design. Moreover, the approach discussed here has the advantage that
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The use of high surface monolithic carbon as support for catalysts offers important advantage, such as elimination of the ohmic drop originated in the interparticle contact and improved mass transport by ad-hoc pore design. Moreover, the approach discussed here has the advantage that it allows the synthesis of materials having a multimodal porous size distribution, with each pore size contributing to the desired properties. On the other hand, the monolithic nature of the porous support also imposes new challenges for metal loading. In this work, the use of Hierarchical Porous Carbon (HPC) as support for PtPd nanoparticles was explored. Three hierarchical porous carbon samples (denoted as HPC-300, HPC-400 and HPC-500) with main pore size around 300, 400 and 500 nm respectively, are used as porous support. PtPd nanoparticles were loaded by impregnation and subsequent chemical reduction with NaBH4. The resulting material was characterized by EDX, XRD and conventional electrochemical techniques. The catalytic activity toward formic acid and methanol electrooxidation was evaluated by electrochemical methods, and the results compared with commercial carbon supported PtPd. The Hierarchical Porous Carbon support discussed here seems to be promising for use in DFAFC anodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Catalysts)
Open AccessArticle PtRu Nanoparticles Deposited by the Sulfite Complex Method on Highly Porous Carbon Xerogels: Effect of the Thermal Treatment
Catalysts 2013, 3(3), 744-756; doi:10.3390/catal3030744
Received: 16 July 2013 / Revised: 6 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 23 September 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1972 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Highly porous carbon xerogels (CXGs) were synthesized to be used as support for PtRu nanoparticles. Metal particles were deposited on CXGs by means of the sulfite complex method for the first time. Catalysts so-obtained were submitted to thermal treatment in H2,
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Highly porous carbon xerogels (CXGs) were synthesized to be used as support for PtRu nanoparticles. Metal particles were deposited on CXGs by means of the sulfite complex method for the first time. Catalysts so-obtained were submitted to thermal treatment in H2, at different temperatures, in order to increase the particle size and thus the intrinsic activity. Physico-chemical characterizations included N2 physisorption, X-Ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Highly dispersed alloyed PtRu particles were obtained, with crystal sizes ranging from 1.6 to 2.0 nm. PtRu-catalysts were tested in half-cell for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The resulting thermal treatment was effective in increasing both particle size and catalytic activity toward MOR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Catalysts)
Open AccessArticle Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts
Catalysts 2013, 3(3), 671-682; doi:10.3390/catal3030671
Received: 19 July 2013 / Revised: 7 August 2013 / Accepted: 12 August 2013 / Published: 21 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1045 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for
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Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK). Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Catalysts)

Review

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Open AccessReview Catalysts Supported on Carbon Materials for the Selective Hydrogenation of Citral
Catalysts 2013, 3(4), 853-877; doi:10.3390/catal3040853
Received: 14 August 2013 / Revised: 22 September 2013 / Accepted: 11 October 2013 / Published: 22 October 2013
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (695 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The heterogeneously catalyzed selective-hydrogenation of citral is one of the more feasible ways for obtaining its appreciated unsaturated-alcohols, nerol and geraniol, which are present in over 250 essential oils. Thus, citral has very recently come to be produced petro-chemically in very large quantities,
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The heterogeneously catalyzed selective-hydrogenation of citral is one of the more feasible ways for obtaining its appreciated unsaturated-alcohols, nerol and geraniol, which are present in over 250 essential oils. Thus, citral has very recently come to be produced petro-chemically in very large quantities, and so partial hydrogenation of citral has become a very economical route for the production of these compounds. However, the selective hydrogenation of citral is not easy, because citral is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde which possesses three double bonds that can be hydrogenated: an isolated C=C bond and the conjugated C=O and C=C bonds. For this reason, in catalyst selection there are several important issues which affect the product selectivity, for example, the active metal and metal particle size which are factors related to the catalyst preparation method, catalyst precursor, or support surface area, as well as other factors such as porosity, the addition of a second catalytic metal, and, of course, the type of catalyst support. About this last one, carbon materials are very interesting supports for this type of hydrogenation reaction due to their unique chemical and textural properties. This review collects and analyzes the results obtained in the selective hydrogenation of citral catalyzed by carbon material supported metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Catalysts)
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Open AccessReview Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells
Catalysts 2013, 3(4), 811-838; doi:10.3390/catal3040811
Received: 10 August 2013 / Revised: 16 September 2013 / Accepted: 18 September 2013 / Published: 21 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1868 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and
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The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF), thermogravimetry (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Catalysts)
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