Special Issue "Building Automation Systems"

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A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gyu Myoung Lee (Website)

School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, James Parsons Building Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK
Phone: +44 151 231 2052
Interests: smart home/building automation; internet of things; web of things

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

So-called “smart buildings” represent a suite of technologies used to make the design, construction and operation of buildings more efficient. Building automation systems including building management systems (BMS) are important components to run heating and cooling systems. Data from these systems can be used to identify additional opportunities for efficiency improvements. As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) applications become more sophisticated, the range of building automation system functions will expand. Building automation system engineering supported by intelligent and networked room and building controllers (lighting, sun protection, heating, ventilation and air conditioning as well as the other building engineering systems) contribute significantly to conservative and requirement-based energy use. Various concepts and approaches are possible in the optimization of energy efficiency in buildings. In this context, the use of intelligent building control provides a proven and interesting alternative or addition that is clearly set apart by its convincing cost-benefit ratio. In addition, there are lots of emerging applications and services in support of building automation systems in the building domain.

This call-for-papers solicits recent, relevant works related to building automation, especially for smart buildings, covering building networks and their applications/services. The main goal is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of building automation system, and to identify the new challenges from emerging building infrastructures.

Articles describing original research and development as well as survey articles related to building automation system are solicited. The topics to be covered by this feature topic include, but are not limited to:

- Framework architecture of building automation infrastructure

- Building networks design and protocols development for smart buildings

- Building automation system development

- Application and services of building automation system (Energy efficiency, emergency communications, etc.)

- Prototyping and experimentation

- Standards and interoperability issues

Papers will be published after acceptance following a full peer-review process.

Prof. Dr. Gyu Myoung Lee
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • smart building
  • building automation system
  • building management system  (BMS)
  • home energy system
  • in-building Energy Storage
  • home area network
  • energy service interface
  • building energy management
  • HVAC(heating,ventilating, and air conditioning)

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Semantics-Rich Information Technology Architecture for Smart Buildings
Buildings 2014, 4(4), 880-910; doi:10.3390/buildings4040880
Received: 25 July 2014 / Revised: 21 October 2014 / Accepted: 21 October 2014 / Published: 4 November 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3939 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The design of smart homes, buildings and environments currently suffers from a low maturity of available methodologies and tools. Technologies, devices and protocols strongly bias the design process towards vertical integration, and more flexible solutions based on separation of design concerns are [...] Read more.
The design of smart homes, buildings and environments currently suffers from a low maturity of available methodologies and tools. Technologies, devices and protocols strongly bias the design process towards vertical integration, and more flexible solutions based on separation of design concerns are seldom applied. As a result, the current landscape of smart environments is mostly populated by defectively designed solutions where application requirements (e.g., end-user functionality) are too often mixed and intertwined with technical requirements (e.g., managing the network of devices). A mature and effective design process must, instead, rely on a clear separation between the application layer and the underlying enabling technologies, to enable effective design reuse. The role of smart gateways is to enable this separation of concerns and to provide an abstracted view of available automation technology to higher software layers. This paper presents a blueprint for the information technology (IT) architecture of smart buildings that builds on top of established software engineering practices, such as model-driven development and semantic representation, and that avoids many pitfalls inherent in legacy approaches. The paper will also present a representative use case where the approach has been applied and the corresponding modeling and software tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Automation Systems)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Software Architecture for Simulation Support in Building Automation
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 320-335; doi:10.3390/buildings4030320
Received: 19 May 2014 / Revised: 20 June 2014 / Accepted: 26 June 2014 / Published: 4 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (480 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Building automation integrates the active components in a building and, thus, has to connect components of different industries. The goal is to provide reliable and efficient operation. This paper describes how simulation can support building automation and how the deployment process of [...] Read more.
Building automation integrates the active components in a building and, thus, has to connect components of different industries. The goal is to provide reliable and efficient operation. This paper describes how simulation can support building automation and how the deployment process of simulation assisted building control systems can be structured. We look at the process as a whole and map it to a set of formally described workflows that can partly be automated. A workbench environment supports the process execution by means of improved planning, collaboration and deployment. This framework allows integration of existing tools, as well as manual tasks, and is, therefore, many more intricate than regular software deployment tools. The complex environment of building commissioning requires expertise in different domains, especially lighting, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, measurement and control technology, as well as energy efficiency; therefore, we present a framework for building commissioning and describe a deployment process that is capable of supporting the various phases of this approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Automation Systems)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Challenges in Getting Building Performance Monitoring Tools for Everyday Use: User Experiences with A New Tool
Buildings 2014, 4(2), 222-243; doi:10.3390/buildings4020222
Received: 27 February 2014 / Revised: 1 April 2014 / Accepted: 21 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
PDF Full-text (124 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a need for building performance monitoring because it is common that buildings do not perform as intended. A number of advanced tools for the purpose have been developed within the last tens of years. However, these tools have not been [...] Read more.
There is a need for building performance monitoring because it is common that buildings do not perform as intended. A number of advanced tools for the purpose have been developed within the last tens of years. However, these tools have not been widely adopted in real use. A new tool presented here utilizes building automation data and transforms the data into a set of performance metrics, and is capable of visualizing building performance from energy, indoor conditions, and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) system perspectives. The purpose of this paper is to study the users’ perceptions of the use of tool. The research method was semi-structured interviews. Although the users were satisfied with the solution in general, it was not taken into operative use. The main challenges with the use of the solution were related to accessibility, trust, and management practices. The interviewees were struggling to manage with numerous information systems and therefore had problems in finding the solution and authenticating to it. All the interviewees did not fully trust the solution, since they did not entirely understand what the performance metrics meant or because the solution had limitations in assessing building performance. Management practices are needed to support the performance measurement philosophy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Automation Systems)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Journal Contact

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buildings@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
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