Special Issue "Sustainable Vertical Urbanism"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kheir Al-Kodmany

Department of Urban Planning and Policy, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 312-413-3884
Fax: +1 312 413 2314
Interests: tall buildings; ecological design; biomimicry; intelligent systems; smart skins; renewable energy; wood skyscraper; retrofitting skyscrapers; vertical farms; green roofs; security systems; ultra-high speed and regenerative energy elevators; social life; life cycle assessment; recycling; bio-degradable materials; sustainable high-rise development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As cities cope with rapid population growth—adding 2.5 billion dwellers by 2050—and grapple with destructive sprawl, politicians, planners, and architects have become increasingly interested in the vertical city paradigm. Unfortunately, cities all over the world are grossly unprepared for integrating tall buildings, as these buildings may aggravate multidimensional sustainability challenges, including social and racial segregation, traffic congestion, overcrowding, and overtaxing the urban infrastructure. The chaotic proliferation of this building typology will guarantee another type of sprawl, a “vertical sprawl”, which could have worse consequences than “horizontal sprawl”.

The theme of this Special Issue builds on the work of prominent scholars and institutions, in particular, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). This Special Issue intends to capture state-of-the-art developments in high-rises. It aims to collate scattered information on the sustainable and unsustainable features of a vertical city. To meet this goal, multi-disciplinary efforts are required to inform on this topic. Scholars from multitude fields—including architecture, planning, urban design, landscape architecture, environmental sciences, energy, social and political sciences, and economic development—are highly encouraged to participate in this Special Issue.

On behalf of Buildings, thank you for your consideration.

Prof. Dr. Kheir Al-Kodmany
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sprawl versus vertical urbanism
  • Environmental costs
  • Socio-economic dimensions
  • Mass transit and transport network
  • Social life: plazas and open spaces
  • New structural systems for tall buildings
  • Green elevators
  • Vertical farms
  • Greenwashing
  • Unsustainable features

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Comparative Evaluation of Structural Systems for Tapered Tall Buildings
Buildings 2018, 8(8), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080108
Received: 15 July 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
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Abstract
Structural efficiency of tapered tall buildings has been well recognized, and many tall buildings of tapered forms have been built throughout the world. Tall buildings are built with an enormous amount of building materials. As one of the most efficient structural forms for
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Structural efficiency of tapered tall buildings has been well recognized, and many tall buildings of tapered forms have been built throughout the world. Tall buildings are built with an enormous amount of building materials. As one of the most efficient structural forms for tall buildings, the contribution of tapered forms to saving structural materials coming from our limited natural resources could be significant. Structural design of tall buildings is generally governed by lateral stiffness rather than strength. This paper systematically studies the structural efficiency of tapered tall buildings in terms of lateral stiffness. Tall buildings of various heights and angles of taper are designed with different structural systems prevalently used for today’s tall buildings, such as diagrids, braced tubes, and core-outrigger systems. The heights of the studied buildings range from 60 to 100 stories, and the corresponding height-to-width aspect ratios in their non-tapered prismatic forms range from 6.5 to 10.8. The angles of taper studied are 1, 2, and 3 degrees. Gross floor area of each building of the same story height is maintained to be the same regardless of the different angles of taper. Based on design studies, comparative evaluation of the various structural systems for tapered tall buildings is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Vertical Urbanism)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Advances in Structural Systems for Tall Buildings: Emerging Developments for Contemporary Urban Giants
Buildings 2018, 8(8), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080104
Received: 2 July 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 30 July 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
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Abstract
New developments of tall buildings of ever-growing heights have been continuously taking place worldwide. Consequently, many innovations in structural systems have emerged. This paper presents a retrospective survey of the main structural systems for tall buildings with emphasis on the advancements of recent,
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New developments of tall buildings of ever-growing heights have been continuously taking place worldwide. Consequently, many innovations in structural systems have emerged. This paper presents a retrospective survey of the main structural systems for tall buildings with emphasis on the advancements of recent, emerging, and potentially emerging systems. A structural systems chart that was previously developed by the authors has been updated in this paper to recognize, categorize and add the more recent structural systems. Recent trends of tubular structural systems in modified forms including the braced megatubes and diagrids are presented. Core-outrigger structural systems are discussed with emphasis on their adaptability. The potential of employing superframes for stand-alone and conjoined megatall buildings is predicted. As a means to solve today’s various project-specific complex design requirements, different mixed structural systems for supertall and megatall buildings are presented. This paper also discusses the widespread application of composite structural systems and recent trends of concrete cores for contemporary tall buildings. Finally, the future of tall buildings is predicted as the race for height continues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Vertical Urbanism)
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Open AccessReview Sustainability and the 21st Century Vertical City: A Review of Design Approaches of Tall Buildings
Buildings 2018, 8(8), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080102
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 26 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2176 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
As cities cope with rapid population growth—adding 2.5 billion dwellers by 2050—and grapple with destructive sprawl, politicians, planners, and architects have become increasingly interested in the vertical city paradigm. Given the large-scale problems of skyscrapers, any improvements in their planning, design, and construction
[...] Read more.
As cities cope with rapid population growth—adding 2.5 billion dwellers by 2050—and grapple with destructive sprawl, politicians, planners, and architects have become increasingly interested in the vertical city paradigm. Given the large-scale problems of skyscrapers, any improvements in their planning, design, and construction would be significant. This paper examines a new crop of skyscrapers that employs green design elements, including aerodynamic forms, greeneries, energy-saving systems, innovative renewable energy techniques, water-saving technologies, rainwater catchment systems, and the like. The examined projects illustrate foremost sustainable design features, strategies, and techniques that help to meet the functional requirements while resulting in attractive forms. They include towers that are completed, under-construction, on-hold, proposed and on the drawing boards. In an attempt to capture a wide-range of innovative ideas and concepts, this paper examines 30 major projects representing major world’s regions that have been active in constructing tall buildings including Southeast Asia and the Far East, the Middle East, Europe, and North America. The discussion section also engages the reader with additional buildings that have employed similar sustainable design. The paper concludes by identifying design approaches that could twin sustainability with iconicity, and highlights some of the shortfalls of intended sustainable design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Vertical Urbanism)
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Open AccessReview The Vertical Farm: A Review of Developments and Implications for the Vertical City
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 5 February 2018
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Abstract
This paper discusses the emerging need for vertical farms by examining issues related to food security, urban population growth, farmland shortages, “food miles”, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Urban planners and agricultural leaders have argued that cities will need to produce food
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This paper discusses the emerging need for vertical farms by examining issues related to food security, urban population growth, farmland shortages, “food miles”, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Urban planners and agricultural leaders have argued that cities will need to produce food internally to respond to demand by increasing population and to avoid paralyzing congestion, harmful pollution, and unaffordable food prices. The paper examines urban agriculture as a solution to these problems by merging food production and consumption in one place, with the vertical farm being suitable for urban areas where available land is limited and expensive. Luckily, recent advances in greenhouse technologies such as hydroponics, aeroponics, and aquaponics have provided a promising future to the vertical farm concept. These high-tech systems represent a paradigm shift in farming and food production and offer suitable and efficient methods for city farming by minimizing maintenance and maximizing yield. Upon reviewing these technologies and examining project prototypes, we find that these efforts may plant the seeds for the realization of the vertical farm. The paper, however, closes by speculating about the consequences, advantages, and disadvantages of the vertical farm’s implementation. Economic feasibility, codes, regulations, and a lack of expertise remain major obstacles in the path to implementing the vertical farm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Vertical Urbanism)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview The Sustainability of Tall Building Developments: A Conceptual Framework
Received: 26 November 2017 / Revised: 24 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 5 January 2018
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Abstract
As cities cope with rapid population growth—adding 2.5 billion dwellers by 2050—and grapple with expansive sprawl, politicians, planners, and architects have become increasingly interested in the vertical city paradigm. This paper reviews and examines shortfalls of tall buildings found in the literature to
[...] Read more.
As cities cope with rapid population growth—adding 2.5 billion dwellers by 2050—and grapple with expansive sprawl, politicians, planners, and architects have become increasingly interested in the vertical city paradigm. This paper reviews and examines shortfalls of tall buildings found in the literature to inform future developments. The paper gathers a vast amount of fragmented criticism and concerns, and organizes them around the three pillars of sustainability: social, economic, and environmental. Mapping out the “unsustainable” aspects forms the foundation for addressing them in future research and tall building developments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Vertical Urbanism)
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