E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Veterinary Vaccines"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jean-Pierre Scheerlinck (Website)

Center for Animal Biotechnology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Corner Flemington Road and Park Drive, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
Fax: +61-3-8344-7374
Interests: regulation of immune responses and lymphocyte recirculation; development of protein and DNA vaccines; animal models for human diseases; infectious diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few years there has been a renewed interest in the development of veterinary adjuvants and vaccines, taking advantage of novel technologies in genomics, immunology and infectious diseases. As a result important breakthroughs have been achieved that will shape the way infections of production animals and wildlife will be tackled in the future.

This special issue considers these new advances and their implications in the field of veterinary vaccines. The interplay between human and veterinary vaccine development will also be considered. With increasing threads including the emergence of drug resistance and novel infective agents these “Advances in Veterinary Vaccines” will become critical in the future.

Dr. Jean-Pierre Scheerlinck
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • veterinary
  • vaccines
  • adjuvants
  • DNA vaccines
  • immunity
  • immune responses
  • protection
  • mucosal
  • systemic

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods
Animals 2011, 1(4), 414-432; doi:10.3390/ani1040414
Received: 29 October 2011 / Revised: 19 November 2011 / Accepted: 22 November 2011 / Published: 29 November 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (503 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not [...] Read more.
In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Veterinary Vaccines)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Vaccines against a Major Cause of Abortion in Cattle, Neospora caninum Infection
Animals 2011, 1(3), 306-325; doi:10.3390/ani1030306
Received: 28 July 2011 / Revised: 30 August 2011 / Accepted: 6 September 2011 / Published: 8 September 2011
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (215 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Neosporosis, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum, represents one of the economically most important causes of abortion in cattle. During pregnancy, the parasite infects the placental tissue and the fetus, which can lead to stillbirth, abortion, or birth of weak [...] Read more.
Neosporosis, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum, represents one of the economically most important causes of abortion in cattle. During pregnancy, the parasite infects the placental tissue and the fetus, which can lead to stillbirth, abortion, or birth of weak calves. Alternatively, calves are born without clinical symptoms, but they can carry over the parasite to the next generation. In addition, N. caninum causes neuromuscular disease in dogs. The economic importance of neosporosis has prompted researchers to invest in the development of measures to prevent infection of cattle by vaccination. A good vaccine must stimulate protective cellular immune responses as well as antibody responses at mucosal sites and, systemically, must activate T-helper cells to produce relevant cytokines, and must elicit specific antibodies that aid in limiting parasite proliferation, e.g., by interference with host cell invasion, activation of complement, and/or opsonization of parasites to have them killed by macrophages. Different types of vaccines have been investigated, either in bovines or in the mouse model. These include live vaccines such as naturally less virulent isolates of N. caninum, attenuated strains generated by irradiation or chemical means, or genetically modified transgenic strains. Live vaccines were shown to be very effective; however, there are serious disadvantages in terms of safety, costs of production, and stability of the final product. Subunit vaccines have been intensively studied, as they would have clear advantages such as reduced costs in production, processing and storage, increased stability and shelf life. The parasite antigens involved in adhesion and invasion of host cells, such as surface constituents, microneme-, rhoptry- and dense granule-components represent interesting targets. Subunit vaccines have been applied as bacterially expressed recombinant antigens or as DNA vaccines. Besides monovalent vaccines also polyvalent combinations of different antigens have been used, providing increased protection. Vaccines have been combined with immunostimulating carriers and, more recently, chimeric vaccines, incorporating immuno-relevant domains of several antigens into a single protein, have been developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Veterinary Vaccines)
Open AccessReview Plague: Infections of Companion Animals and Opportunities for Intervention
Animals 2011, 1(2), 242-255; doi:10.3390/ani1020242
Received: 19 May 2011 / Revised: 20 June 2011 / Accepted: 20 June 2011 / Published: 21 June 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (115 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plague is a zoonotic disease, normally circulating in rodent populations, transmitted to humans most commonly through the bite of an infected flea vector. Secondary infection of the lungs results in generation of infectious aerosols, which pose a significant hazard to close contacts. [...] Read more.
Plague is a zoonotic disease, normally circulating in rodent populations, transmitted to humans most commonly through the bite of an infected flea vector. Secondary infection of the lungs results in generation of infectious aerosols, which pose a significant hazard to close contacts. In enzootic areas, plague infections have been reported in owners and veterinarians who come into contact with infected pets. Dogs are relatively resistant, but can import infected fleas into the home. Cats are acutely susceptible, and can present a direct hazard to health. Reducing roaming and hunting behaviours, combined with flea control measures go some way to reducing the risk to humans. Various vaccine formulations have been developed which may be suitable to protect companion animals from contracting plague, and thus preventing onward transmission to man. Since transmission has resulted in a number of fatal cases of plague, the vaccination of domestic animals such as cats would seem a low cost strategy for reducing the risk of infection by this serious disease in enzootic regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Veterinary Vaccines)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Animals Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
animals@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Animals
Back to Top