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Special Issue "Evolutionary Aspects of Taxonomic Diversity Patterns"

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A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bradford A. Hawkins (Website)

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 321 Steinhaus Hall, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
Interests: biogeography; macroecology; diversity gradients
Guest Editor
Dr. Xiao-Lei Huang (Website)

Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: biodiversity pattern; biogeography; entomology; evolutionary biology; fauna evolution; genomics; molecular phylogenetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the time of Linnaeus and earlier, we have been collecting specimens, giving them names, and describing biodiversity patterns in nature. Although we now have knowledge of biodiversity, albeit incomplete, we still have a lot of work to do to understand patterns and mechanisms in more regions and taxa. Importantly, we need to improve our understanding of historical processes that shape biodiversity patterns. To answer this question, research needs to focus on the full range of hierarchical levels (from ecological to molecular). We hope this special issue provide an unique forum on this topic.

We invite authors to contribute your latest research focusing on evolutionary aspects of diversity gradients and historical processes of faunal evolution. Review articles of theoretical issues or geographical regions are particularly welcome. Case studies of specific taxa or areas as well as short communications are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Bradford A. Hawkins
Dr. Xiao-Lei Huang
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • biodiversity
  • biogeography
  • climate change
  • conservation
  • diversity patterns
  • evolutionary process
  • fauna evolution
  • genetic diversity
  • phylogeography
  • species richness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness
Animals 2011, 1(2), 205-241; doi:10.3390/ani1020205
Received: 22 February 2011 / Revised: 21 April 2011 / Accepted: 22 April 2011 / Published: 29 April 2011
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Abstract
The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world’s land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world’s total [...] Read more.
The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world’s land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world’s total liquid water supply. How have so many species come to co-exist in such a small amount of total habitat space? Here we report results of an aquatic faunal survey of the Fitzcarrald region in southeastern Peru, an area of low-elevation upland (200–500 m above sea level) rainforest in the Western Amazon, that straddles the headwaters of four large Amazonian tributaries; the Juruá (Yurúa), Ucayali, Purús, and Madre de Dios rivers. All measures of fish species diversity in this region are high; there is high alpha diversity with many species coexisting in the same locality, high beta diversity with high turnover between habitats, and high gamma diversity with high turnover between adjacent tributary basins. Current data show little species endemism, and no known examples of sympatric sister species, within the Fitzcarrald region, suggesting a lack of localized or recent adaptive divergences. These results support the hypothesis that the fish species of the Fitzcarrald region are relatively ancient, predating the Late Miocene-Pliocene (c. 4 Ma) uplift that isolated its several headwater basins. The results also suggest that habitat specialization (phylogenetic niche conservatism) and geographic isolation (dispersal limitation) have contributed to the maintenance of high species richness in this region of the Amazon Basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evolutionary Aspects of Taxonomic Diversity Patterns)

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