E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Animal Rehabilitation"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anne E. Russon

Psychology Department, Glendon Campus, York University, 2275 Bayview Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M6, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: great ape rehabilitation; great ape conservation; great ape cognition; great ape learning; great ape development; primate tourism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue focuses on animal rehabilitation, the process of assisting disabled and/or displaced animals gain, or regain, the capabilities needed to live free in suitable natural habitats. Over the last 30 years, as the number of individuals and species in need of rehabilitation has increased, animal rehabilitation has grown from independent small projects run by dedicated individuals to networks of large professionally staffed operations. The accumulated experience has increased awareness of the many complexities involved. Prominent among them are its multiple, sometimes incompatible values and aims (conservation, welfare, legal, ethical), the multi-dimensional nature of the process itself (e.g., medical, nutritional, genetic, ontogenetic, fostering feral competencies, undoing or compensating for damage), addressing both taxon-specific and generalized needs, monitoring and improving effectiveness, and managing rehabilitants’ impacts on the habitats and communities into which they are placed. Equally clear is the need for more systematic, well-informed standards and guidelines for animal rehabilitation, on issues ranging from balancing the multiple values involved to developing programs that are effective in preparing rehabilitants for feral life, establishing criteria for assessing individual rehabilitants’ preparedness, and responsible monitoring and post-rehabilitation practices. This special issue aims to further the development of such standards and guidelines for animal rehabilitation. Manuscripts of original research using methods appropriate to the topic will be considered. Topics could include, but are not limited to, the issues and concerns sketched above.

Prof. Dr. Anne E. Russon
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • animal rehabilitation
  • wildlife rehabilitation
  • animal welfare
  • animal conservation
  • animal learning
  • animal reintroduction
  • rehabilitation medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Changes in Habitat Structure May Explain Decrease in Reintroduced Mohor Gazelle Population in the Guembeul Fauna Reserve, Senegal
Animals 2012, 2(3), 347-360; doi:10.3390/ani2030347
Received: 31 May 2012 / Revised: 23 July 2012 / Accepted: 3 August 2012 / Published: 8 August 2012
PDF Full-text (331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reintroduction is a widespread method for saving populations of endangered species from extinction. In spite of recent reviews, it is difficult to reach general conclusions about its value as a conservation tool, as authors are reluctant to publish unsuccessful results. The Mohor gazelle
[...] Read more.
Reintroduction is a widespread method for saving populations of endangered species from extinction. In spite of recent reviews, it is difficult to reach general conclusions about its value as a conservation tool, as authors are reluctant to publish unsuccessful results. The Mohor gazelle is a North African gazelle, extinct in the wild. Eight individuals were reintroduced in Senegal in 1984. The population grew progressively, albeit slowly, during the first 20 years after release, but then declined dramatically, until the population in 2009 was estimated at no more than 13–15 individuals. This study attempts to determine the likelihood of gazelle-habitat relationships to explain why the size of the gazelle population has diminished. Our results show that the Mohor gazelle in Guembeul is found in open habitats with less developed canopy where the grass is shorter, suggesting the possibility that changes in habitat structure have taken place during the time the gazelles have been in the Reserve, reducing the amount of suitable habitat. Reintroduction design usually concentrates on short-term factors that may affect survival of the released animals and their descendants (short-term achievement), while the key factors for assessing its success may be those that affect the long-term evolution of the population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Rehabilitation)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Animals Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
animals@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Animals
Back to Top