Special Issue "Aviation Alternative Fuels and Energies"

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A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yang Zhang (Website)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK
Phone: 00441142227880
Interests: combustion and flow diagnostics; high altitude reignition; gas turbine combustion and high temperature wall heat transfer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The investigation of aviation alternative fuels and energies has increased significantly in recent years in an effort to reduce the environment and climate impact by aviation industry. Special requirements have to be met for qualifying as a suitable aviation fuel or an alternative aviation power source. The fuel has to be high in energy content per unit of mass and volume, thermally stable and avoiding freezing at low temperatures. There are also many other special requirements on viscosity, ignition properties and compatibility with the typical aviation materials. There are quite a few contending alternative fuels which can be derived from coal, natural gas and biomass. As a result, much research efforts are required to realize the aircraft alternative fuel and energy potentials. This Special Issue is dedicated to the various aspects of aviation alternative fuels and energies.

Prof. Dr. Yang Zhang
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • aviation alternative fuels
  • aviation alternative energy
  • sustainable energy
  • hydroelectricity
  • solar energy
  • wind energy
  • bioenergy
  • biofuels
  • fuel variability
  • thermal stability
  • ignition properties
  • fuel compatibility
  • Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels from fossil feedstocks and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) biomass-to-liquid (BTL) fuels

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial Special Issue: Aviation Alternative Fuels
Aerospace 2014, 1(3), 100; doi:10.3390/aerospace1030100
Received: 12 December 2014 / Accepted: 15 December 2014 / Published: 16 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (581 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The investigation of aviation alternative fuels has increased significantly in recent years in an effort to reduce the environment and climate impact by aviation industry. Special requirements have to be met for qualifying as a suitable aviation fuel. The fuel has to [...] Read more.
The investigation of aviation alternative fuels has increased significantly in recent years in an effort to reduce the environment and climate impact by aviation industry. Special requirements have to be met for qualifying as a suitable aviation fuel. The fuel has to be high in energy content per unit of mass and volume, thermally stable and avoiding freezing at low temperatures. There are also many other special requirements on viscosity, ignition properties and compatibility with the typical aviation materials. There are quite a few contending alternative fuels which can be derived from coal, natural gas and biomass.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Alternative Fuels and Energies)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Interaction between Crosswind and Aviation-Fuel Fire Engulfing a Full-Scale Composite-Type Aircraft: A Numerical Study
Aerospace 2015, 2(2), 279-311; doi:10.3390/aerospace2020279
Received: 3 April 2015 / Revised: 20 May 2015 / Accepted: 21 May 2015 / Published: 28 May 2015
PDF Full-text (3077 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This numerical study focuses on the fire phenomenology associated with the presence of a composite-type aircraft immersed, at one particular location and orientation, within a large aviation-fuel fire in a moving fluid medium. An extension of the eddy dissipation concept is incorporated, [...] Read more.
This numerical study focuses on the fire phenomenology associated with the presence of a composite-type aircraft immersed, at one particular location and orientation, within a large aviation-fuel fire in a moving fluid medium. An extension of the eddy dissipation concept is incorporated, allowing one to investigate the roles of the wind speed and its direction on the fire growth, heat flux distribution and smoke products, such as carbon monoxide and soot. The predicted flame shape compares well with the measurements for an intermediate-scale fire. The outcome of the study is interesting, and the interaction model between turbulence and combustion is indeed adequate. The prediction indicates that interaction between the large object and fire environment combined with the influence of wind conditions dramatically affects the continuous flame shape. The increase of the wind speed results in an alteration of the distribution of the incident heat fluxes to the engulfed fuselage skin for a case where the fire and fuselage are of comparable size. The highest heat flux occurs on the windward side of the fuselage for the low and medium winds, but on the leeward side of the fuselage for the high wind. The peak in heat flux to the medium or high wind is almost equal in magnitude, but about a factor four increase of that to the low wind. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Alternative Fuels and Energies)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Comparison of Vibrations and Emissions of Conventional Jet Fuel with Stressed 100% SPK and Fully Formulated Synthetic Jet Fuel
Aerospace 2014, 1(2), 52-66; doi:10.3390/aerospace1020052
Received: 30 January 2014 / Revised: 4 July 2014 / Accepted: 25 July 2014 / Published: 27 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1333 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The rapid growth of the aviation sector around the globe has witnessed an overwhelming impact on fossil fuel resources. With the implementation of stricter environmental laws over emissions by conventional jet fuels, growing demand for research on alternative fuels has become imperative. [...] Read more.
The rapid growth of the aviation sector around the globe has witnessed an overwhelming impact on fossil fuel resources. With the implementation of stricter environmental laws over emissions by conventional jet fuels, growing demand for research on alternative fuels has become imperative. One-hundred percent Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) and Fully Formulated Synthetic Jet Fuel have surfaced as viable alternatives for gas turbine engines due to their similar properties as that of Jet Fuel. This paper presents results from an experimental study performed on a small gas turbine engine, comparing emissions performance and vibrations for conventional Jet A-1 Fuel, thermally stressed 100% SPK and Fully Formulated Synthetic Jet Fuel. Different vibration frequencies, power spectra were observed for different fuels. Gaseous emissions observed were nearly the same, whereas, significant changes in particulates emissions were observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Alternative Fuels and Energies)

Review

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Open AccessReview Reforming Technologies to Improve the Performance of Combustion Systems
Aerospace 2014, 1(2), 67-96; doi:10.3390/aerospace1020067
Received: 7 February 2014 / Revised: 30 June 2014 / Accepted: 7 July 2014 / Published: 4 September 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3805 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A large number of theoretical and experimental studies have shown that the performance of kerosene combustion increases significantly if combustion is being assisted by the addition of hydrogen to the fuel/air mixture during the combustion process. It reduces the amount of CO, [...] Read more.
A large number of theoretical and experimental studies have shown that the performance of kerosene combustion increases significantly if combustion is being assisted by the addition of hydrogen to the fuel/air mixture during the combustion process. It reduces the amount of CO, CO2 and NOx emissions, while increasing the flame stability limits. It also helps in bruning fuel/air mixtures at much leaner equivalence ratios. The same principle could be applied to gain benefits in gas turbine combustors. Hydrogen for this purpose could be produced by the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels using a reformer module. This paper presents key hydrogen reforming technologies which, by implementation in gas turbine combustors, hold potential for improving both their performance and service life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Alternative Fuels and Energies)

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