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ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf., Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2012), Pages 1-107

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Understanding and Managing Our Earth through Integrated Use and Analysis of Geo-Information
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010001
Received: 2 September 2011 / Accepted: 2 September 2011 / Published: 8 September 2011
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Abstract
All things in our world are related to some location in space and time, and according to Tobler’s first law of geography “everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things” [1]. Since humans exist they have
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All things in our world are related to some location in space and time, and according to Tobler’s first law of geography “everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things” [1]. Since humans exist they have been contemplating about space and time and have tried to depict and manage the geographic space they live in. We know graphic representations of the land from various regions of the world dating back several thousands of years. The processing and analysis of spatial data has a long history in the disciplines that deal with spatial data such as geography, surveying engineering, cartography, photogrammetry, and remote sensing. Until recently, all these activities have been analog in nature; only since the invention of the computer in the second half of the 20th century and the use of computers for the acquisition, storage, analysis, and display of spatial data starting in the 1960s we speak of geo-information and geo-information systems. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Modeling Urban Land Cover Growth Dynamics Using Multi‑Temporal Satellite Images: A Case Study of Dhaka, Bangladesh
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 3-31; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010003
Received: 29 January 2012 / Revised: 7 February 2012 / Accepted: 8 February 2012 / Published: 23 February 2012
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (4494 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The primary objective of this research is to predict and analyze the future urban growth of Dhaka City using the Landsat satellite images of 1989, 1999 and 2009. Dhaka City Corporation (DCC) and its surrounding impact areas have been selected as the study
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The primary objective of this research is to predict and analyze the future urban growth of Dhaka City using the Landsat satellite images of 1989, 1999 and 2009. Dhaka City Corporation (DCC) and its surrounding impact areas have been selected as the study area. At the beginning, a fisher supervised classification method has been applied to prepare the base maps with five land cover classes. In the next stage, three different models have been implemented to simulate the land cover map of Dhaka city of 2009. These have been named as “Stochastic Markov (St_Markov)” Model, “Cellular Automata Markov (CA_Markov)” Model and “Multi Layer Perceptron Markov (MLP_Markov)” Model. Then the best-fitted model has been selected by implementing a method to compare land cover categories in three maps: a reference map of time 1, a reference map of time 2 and a simulation map of time 2. This is how the “Multi Layer Perceptron Markov (MLP_Markov)” Model has been qualified as the most appropriate model for this research. Later, using the MLP_Markov model, the land cover map of 2019 has been predicted. The MLP_Markov model extrapolates that built-up area increases from 46% to 58% of the total study area during 2009–2019. Full article
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Open AccessArticle EASE-Grid 2.0: Incremental but Significant Improvements for Earth-Gridded Data Sets
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 32-45; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010032
Received: 30 January 2012 / Revised: 28 February 2012 / Accepted: 1 March 2012 / Published: 13 March 2012
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (2194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
Defined in the early 1990s for use with gridded satellite passive microwave data, the Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) was quickly adopted and used for distribution of a variety of satellite and in situ data sets. Conceptually easy to understand, EASE-Grid
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Defined in the early 1990s for use with gridded satellite passive microwave data, the Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) was quickly adopted and used for distribution of a variety of satellite and in situ data sets. Conceptually easy to understand, EASE-Grid suffers from limitations that make it impossible to format in the widely popular GeoTIFF convention without reprojection. Importing EASE-Grid data into standard mapping software packages is nontrivial and error-prone. This article defines a standard for an improved EASE-Grid 2.0 definition, addressing how the changes rectify issues with the original grid definition. Data distributed using the EASE-Grid 2.0 standard will be easier for users to import into standard software packages and will minimize common reprojection errors that users had encountered with the original EASE-Grid definition. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Prioritizing Areas for Rehabilitation by Monitoring Change in Barangay-Based Vegetation Cover
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 46-68; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010046
Received: 29 December 2011 / Revised: 1 March 2012 / Accepted: 5 March 2012 / Published: 13 March 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1111 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Analysis of spatial and temporal changes of vegetation cover using remote sensing (RS) technology, in conjunction with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), is becoming increasingly important in environmental conservation. The objective of this study was to use RS data and GIS techniques to assess
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Analysis of spatial and temporal changes of vegetation cover using remote sensing (RS) technology, in conjunction with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), is becoming increasingly important in environmental conservation. The objective of this study was to use RS data and GIS techniques to assess the vegetation cover in 1989 and 2009, in the barangays (smallest administrative units) of the city of San Fernando, La Union, the Philippines, for planning vegetation rehabilitation. Landsat images were used to prepare both the 1989 and 2009 land cover maps, which were then used to detect changes in the vegetation cover for the barangays. In addition to conventional accuracy assessment parameters such as; proportion correct, and standard Kappa index of agreement, two other parameters; quantity, and allocation disagreements were used to assess the accuracy of the land cover classification. Results revealed that there were gains and losses of vegetation cover in most of the barangays, but overall vegetation cover increased by 11% (around 625 ha) based on the original extent of 1989. Those barangays that showed substantial net losses in vegetation cover need to be prioritised for rehabilitation planning. As exemplified in this study, the collection, processing and analysis of relevant RS and GIS information, can facilitate priority-setting in the planning of environmental rehabilitation and conservation by the local government at both city and barangay levels. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Exposure Estimation from Multi-Resolution Optical Satellite Imagery for Seismic Risk Assessment
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 69-88; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010069
Received: 10 April 2012 / Revised: 11 May 2012 / Accepted: 17 May 2012 / Published: 29 May 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Given high urbanization rates and increasing spatio-temporal variability in many present-day cities, exposure information is often out-of-date, highly aggregated or spatially fragmented, increasing the uncertainties associated with seismic risk assessments. This work therefore aims at using space-based technologies to estimate, complement and extend exposure
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Given high urbanization rates and increasing spatio-temporal variability in many present-day cities, exposure information is often out-of-date, highly aggregated or spatially fragmented, increasing the uncertainties associated with seismic risk assessments. This work therefore aims at using space-based technologies to estimate, complement and extend exposure data at multiple scales, over large areas and at a comparatively low cost for the case of the city of Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. At a neighborhood scale, an analysis of urban structures using medium-resolution optical satellite images is performed. Applying image classification and change-detection analysis to a time-series of Landsat images, the urban environment can be delineated into areas of relatively homogeneous urban structure types, which can provide a first estimate of an exposed building stock (e.g., approximate age of structures, composition and distribution of predominant building types). At a building-by-building scale, a more detailed analysis of the exposed building stock is carried out using a high-resolution Quickbird image. Furthermore, the multi-resolution datasets are combined with census data to disaggregate population statistics. The tools used within this study are being developed on a free- and open-source basis and aim at being transparent, usable and transferable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space-Based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management)
Open AccessArticle Exploring Human Activity Patterns Using Taxicab Static Points
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 89-107; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010089
Received: 23 April 2012 / Revised: 10 June 2012 / Accepted: 11 June 2012 / Published: 15 June 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1629 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores the patterns of human activities within a geographical space by adopting the taxicab static points which refer to the locations with zero speed along the tracking trajectory. We report the findings from both aggregated and individual aspects. Results from the
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This paper explores the patterns of human activities within a geographical space by adopting the taxicab static points which refer to the locations with zero speed along the tracking trajectory. We report the findings from both aggregated and individual aspects. Results from the aggregated level indicate the following: (1) Human activities exhibit an obvious regularity in time, for example, there is a burst of activity during weekend nights and a lull during the week. (2) They show a remarkable spatial drifting pattern, which strengthens our understanding of the activities in any given place. (3) Activities are heterogeneous in space irrespective of their drifting with time. These aggregated results not only help in city planning, but also facilitate traffic control and management. On the other hand, investigations on an individual level suggest that (4) activities witnessed by one taxicab will have different temporal regularity to another, and (5) each regularity implies a high level of prediction with low entropy by applying the Lempel-Ziv algorithm. Full article
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