Special Issue "Rapid Manufacturing Technologies"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Innovations in Materials Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dimitris Karalekas

Director of Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies and Testing, Department of Industrial Management and Technology, University of Piraeus, Karaoli and Dimitriou 80 Str.,GR-18534, Piraeus, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mechanics and materials in design; additive layered manufacturing; 3D printing; composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last three decades have seen the emergence and evolution of new manufacturing technologies that offer the benefits of complexity, speed, cost, and high quality of products. Rapid Manufacturing (RM) Technologies, based on Additive Manufacturing techniques (AM), make possible the fabrication of end-use items directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) data. Rapid Manufacturing is an extension of Rapid Prototyping and Rapid Tooling for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The impact of RM technologies is far-reaching and the opportunities and advantages are enormous. Implications are significant for many sectors, such as aerospace, aeronautics, automotive, civil and medical, which are ready to take advantage of developments in RM. Despite significant research efforts, the evolution of RM technologies is far from complete with many significant challenges that need to be overcome. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect a series of articles (experimental, analytical and computational) related to technologies, methods, materials, systems and applications in the field of Rapid Manufacturing.

Prof. Dr. Dimitris Karalekas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Technologies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Design optimization tools and strategies
  • Simulation models for RM processes
  • Process reliability and product quality
  • Materials considerations and characterization
  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Application of available technologies
  • 3D micro/nanostructures

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Development of a Resilient 3-D Printer for Humanitarian Crisis Response
Technologies 2018, 6(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies6010030
Received: 12 February 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 1 March 2018 / Published: 9 March 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4553 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rapid manufacturing using 3-D printing is a potential solution to some of the most pressing issues for humanitarian logistics. In this paper, findings are reported from a study that involved development of a new type of 3-D printer. In particular, a novel 3-D
[...] Read more.
Rapid manufacturing using 3-D printing is a potential solution to some of the most pressing issues for humanitarian logistics. In this paper, findings are reported from a study that involved development of a new type of 3-D printer. In particular, a novel 3-D printer that is designed specifically for reliable rapid manufacturing at the sites of humanitarian crises. First, required capabilities are developed with design elements of a humanitarian 3-D printer, which include, (1) fused filament fabrication, (2) open source self-replicating rapid prototyper design, (3) modular, (4) separate frame, (5) protected electronics, (6) on-board computing, (7) flexible power supply, and (8) climate control mechanisms. The technology is then disclosed with an open source license for the Kijenzi 3-D Printer. A swarm of five Kijenzi 3-D printers are evaluated for rapid part manufacturing for two months at health facilities and other community locations in both rural and urban areas throughout Kisumu County, Kenya. They were successful for their ability to function independently of infrastructure, transportability, ease of use, ability to withstand harsh environments and costs. The results are presented and conclusions are drawn about future work necessary for the Kijenzi 3-D Printer to meet the needs of rapid manufacturing in a humanitarian context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rapid Manufacturing Technologies)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Additive Manufacturing of a 316L Steel Matrix Composite Reinforced with CeO2 Particles: Process Optimization by Adjusting the Laser Scanning Speed
Technologies 2018, 6(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies6010025
Received: 28 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (18493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The synthesis of novel materials by additive manufacturing requires the optimization of the processing parameters in order to obtain fully-dense defect-free specimens. This step is particularly important for processing of composite materials, where the addition of a second phase may significantly alter the
[...] Read more.
The synthesis of novel materials by additive manufacturing requires the optimization of the processing parameters in order to obtain fully-dense defect-free specimens. This step is particularly important for processing of composite materials, where the addition of a second phase may significantly alter the melting and solidification steps. In this work, a composite consisting of a 316L steel matrix and 5 vol.% CeO2 particles was fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). The SLM parameters leading to a defect-free 316L matrix are not suitable for the production of 316L/CeO2 composite specimens. However, highly-dense composite samples can be synthesized by carefully adjusting the laser scanning speed, while keeping the other parameters constant. The addition of the CeO2 reinforcement does not alter phase formation, but it affects the microstructure of the composite, which is significantly refined compared with the unreinforced 316L material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rapid Manufacturing Technologies)
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