Special Issue "Physiological Monitoring Technologies"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Assistive Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hung Cao

Division of Engineering, School of Science, Technology and Mathematics, University of Washington, Bothell campus, 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011-8246, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: MEMS; BioMEMS; Medical Devices; Neural Engineering; Cardiovascular Engineering
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Tung Thanh Bui

Faculty of Electronics and Telecommunications (FET), University of Engineering and Technology (UET), Vietnam National University, Hanoi (VNU) 144 Xuan Thuy Street, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Vietnam
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; cancer cell detection; corona ion wind; CNT-based sensors and applications; 3D packaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Newly-emerging technologies have been enhancing our life quality in many aspects, from automobile industry to pharmacology, home appliances to heavy-duty crafts, consumer tools to medical equipment, and etc. Among those technologies utilized for healthcare and biological investigations, while micro- and nano-fabrication provided miniaturized sensors and systems with better sensitivity and selectivity; telecommunications and innovations in electronics helped in reducing the cost, bringing convenience and establishing distanced care which was recently defined as personalized- and tele-medicine or mobile-health (m-Health). With novel biomaterials, all of these enabled efficient biomedical systems that could be wearable or deployed in vivo, targeting diagnosis, prognosis and investigations of chronic diseases as well as continuous health monitoring. In addition, the recent rising of internet of things (IoTs) and big data has paved the avenue for those biomedical devices to become popular and widely accepted by our society.

In this context, we invite submissions to this Special Issue “Physiological Monitoring Technologies” as review articles, original research papers, and short communications covering a broad field of technologies supporting physiological monitoring for both human and animal models, targeting health monitoring and biological studies.

Contributions may include, but are not limited to:

  • Design and development of sensors, electronics and systems for physiological monitoring

  • Smart computational schemes and/or algorithms to enhance the efficiency and efficacy of physiological monitoring systems

  • Smart materials and/or design to enhance the efficiency and efficacy of physiological monitoring systems

  • Novel concepts, technologies and implementation for acquiring, processing and monitoring physiological signals

Dr. Hung Cao
Dr. Tung Thanh Bui
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Technologies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physiological monitoring
  • biosensors
  • bioelectronics
  • biomedical devices
  • novel technologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Development of 1Balance: A Connected Medical Device for Measuring Human Balance
Technologies 2018, 6(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies6020053
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 20 May 2018 / Accepted: 24 May 2018 / Published: 26 May 2018
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Abstract
Prototyping (iterative loops of design–build–test) is a proven method of efficiently developing new products. Developing products not only quickly, but that are also fit for purpose, implies engaging the end users and iterating the technology at hand. However, there is currently little research
[...] Read more.
Prototyping (iterative loops of design–build–test) is a proven method of efficiently developing new products. Developing products not only quickly, but that are also fit for purpose, implies engaging the end users and iterating the technology at hand. However, there is currently little research on how engineering design can approach developing connected devices. The purpose of this paper is to distinguish and discuss design approaches that are suitable for connected devices. Internet of Things devices consist of both the physical products themselves and the data that is coming out of the products, which we define as the external and internal data, respectively. They both can be prototyped separately, but since the data acquired can influence the design of the device and vice versa, we propose to link these two together in the product development process. This issue becomes more apparent when designing networks of sensors, e.g., for complex artificial intelligence (AI) databases. We explain the principle by describing the development of 1Balance through six different prototypes for human balance measurement. Technologically quantifying balance is an underused approach for objectively evaluating the state of a human’s performance. The authors have developed a mobile application for monitoring balance as a physiological signal (amount of sway) via a compact wireless inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor strapped to the body of the subject for the duration of the measurement. We describe the design process for developing this connected medical device, as well as how the acquired data was used to improve the design of the product. In conclusion, we propose conceptually connecting the external and internal data prototyping loops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological Monitoring Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle A Low-Complexity Model-Free Approach for Real-Time Cardiac Anomaly Detection Based on Singular Spectrum Analysis and Nonparametric Control Charts
Technologies 2018, 6(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies6010026
Received: 11 December 2017 / Revised: 8 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4660 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While the importance of continuous monitoring of electrocardiographic (ECG) or photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals to detect cardiac anomalies is generally accepted in preventative medicine, there remain numerous challenges to its widespread adoption. Most notably, difficulties arise regarding crucial characteristics such as real-time capability, computational
[...] Read more.
While the importance of continuous monitoring of electrocardiographic (ECG) or photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals to detect cardiac anomalies is generally accepted in preventative medicine, there remain numerous challenges to its widespread adoption. Most notably, difficulties arise regarding crucial characteristics such as real-time capability, computational complexity, the amount of required training data, and the avoidance of too-restrictive modeling assumptions. We propose a lightweight and model-free approach for the online detection of cardiac anomalies such as ectopic beats in ECG or PPG signals on the basis of the change detection capabilities of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and nonparametric rank-based cumulative sum (CUSUM) control charts. The procedure is able to quickly detect anomalies without requiring the identification of fiducial points such as R-peaks, and it is computationally significantly less demanding than previously proposed SSA-based approaches. Therefore, the proposed procedure is equally well suited for standalone use and as an add-on to complement existing (e.g., heart rate (HR) estimation) procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological Monitoring Technologies)
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