Special Issue "Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Novel Microstructures and Components Shapes"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Innovations in Materials Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anders E. W. Jarfors

Department of Materials and Manufacturing, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11, Jönköping, Sweden
Website | E-Mail
Interests: solidification processing; semisolid processing; light weight materials (aluminum and magnesium); metals mechanical behaviour; thermo-physical properties of metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The manufacturing process, and the material used, creates the capability to produce a functional shape. The interplay between the processing conditions and the materials chemistry will, together, give the material its properties. This will, in some cases, result in homogeneous properties and, sometimes, in textures or directional properties, in addition to local variations of the properties, as the actual processing conditions may vary with the part geometry. New processes, such as Rheocasting, offer cost-effective routes for mass production of complex shapes, representing one end of the manufacturing field. On the other end, we have Hot Isostatic Pressing and Additive manufacturing, capable of short series production and offering a great design freedom. Accordingly, this Special Issue aims to publish papers in the area of manufacturing processes capable of offering design freedom in terms of shape, such as, metals casting, semisolid forming, powder metallurgy, single point incremental sheet metal forming and additive manufacturing. This Special Issue is limited to metallic material, but metal-based composites and nanocomposites are welcome. Particular attention should be given to the interplay between the processing conditions and the actual material properties of the component manufactured, including local variations. The properties include both mechanical properties and thermos-physical properties to encompass all functional properties contribution to the manufactured component performance.

Prof. Dr. Anders E. W. Jarfors
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Technologies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • casting
  • semisolid processing
  • sintering
  • additive manufacturing
  • material properties
  • metals
  • alloys
  • composites
  • powder metallurgy
  • laser cladding
  • thermal conductivity
  • thermal diffusivity
  • stiffness
  • strength
  • ductility
  • toughness
  • fatigue
  • surface finish

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Tensile Properties of Al-12Si Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM) at Different Temperatures
Technologies 2016, 4(4), 38; doi:10.3390/technologies4040038
Received: 13 October 2016 / Revised: 28 November 2016 / Accepted: 30 November 2016 / Published: 2 December 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting (SLM) are attracting increasing attention and are regarded as the manufacturing technology of the future, because of their ability to produce near net shaped components of theoretically any shape with added functionality. Various properties, including
[...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting (SLM) are attracting increasing attention and are regarded as the manufacturing technology of the future, because of their ability to produce near net shaped components of theoretically any shape with added functionality. Various properties, including mechanical, tribological, welding, and corrosion properties, of Al-12Si alloys fabricated via SLM have been extensively studied. However, all of these studies were carried out at ambient conditions. Nevertheless, under working conditions, these alloys experience service temperatures ranging between 373 and 473 K. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the mechanical properties of SLM-fabricated Al-12Si alloys in this temperature range. For this, Al-12Si alloy specimens were annealed at 573 K, a temperature well beyond the test temperature in order to provide a stable microstructure during tensile testing. The plasticity of these materials increases along with the size of the dimples on the fracture surface with increasing tensile test temperature. Moreover, the annealed Al-12Si alloy exhibits appreciable tensile properties when tested between 373 K and 473 K. The results suggest that Al-12Si samples fabricated via SLM may be ideal candidates for automotive applications such as pistons and cylinder heads. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Particle Size on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Based Composite Reinforced with 10 Vol.% Mechanically Alloyed Mg-7.4%Al Particles
Technologies 2016, 4(4), 37; doi:10.3390/technologies4040037
Received: 20 August 2016 / Revised: 15 November 2016 / Accepted: 16 November 2016 / Published: 19 November 2016
PDF Full-text (3807 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of Mg-7.4%Al reinforcement particle size on the microstructure and mechanical properties in pure Al matrix composites was investigated. The samples were prepared by hot consolidation using 10 vol.% reinforcement in different size ranges, D, 0 < D < 20 µm (0–20
[...] Read more.
The effect of Mg-7.4%Al reinforcement particle size on the microstructure and mechanical properties in pure Al matrix composites was investigated. The samples were prepared by hot consolidation using 10 vol.% reinforcement in different size ranges, D, 0 < D < 20 µm (0–20 µm), 20 ≤ D < 40 µm (20–40 µm), 40 ≤ D < 80 µm (40–80 µm) and 80 ≤ D < 100 µm (80–100 µm). The result reveals that particle size has a strong influence on the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and percentage elongation. As the particle size decreases from 80 ≤ D < 100 µm to 0 < D < 20 µm, both tensile strength and ductility increases from 195 MPa to 295 MPa and 3% to 4% respectively, due to the reduced ligament size and particle fracturing. Wear test results also corroborate the size effect, where accelerated wear is observed in the composite samples reinforced with coarse particles. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of 316L Steel Cellular Dodecahedron Structures Produced by Selective Laser Melting
Technologies 2016, 4(4), 34; doi:10.3390/technologies4040034
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 22 September 2016 / Accepted: 28 September 2016 / Published: 8 October 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (8395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The compression behavior of different 316L steel cellular dodecahedron structures with different density values were studied. The 316L steel structures produced using the selective laser melting process has four different geometries: single unit cells with and without the addition of base plates beneath
[...] Read more.
The compression behavior of different 316L steel cellular dodecahedron structures with different density values were studied. The 316L steel structures produced using the selective laser melting process has four different geometries: single unit cells with and without the addition of base plates beneath and on top, and sandwich structures with multiple unit cells with different unit cell sizes. The relation between the relative compressive strength and the relative density was compared using different Gibson-Ashby models and with other published reports. The different aspects of the deformation and the mechanical properties were evaluated and the deformation at distinct loading levels was recorded. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were carried out with the defined structures and the mechanical testing results were compared. The calculated theory, simulation estimation, and the observed experimental results are in good agreement. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of New Generation Ti-45Nb Porous Alloys Implant Devices
Technologies 2016, 4(4), 33; doi:10.3390/technologies4040033
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 23 September 2016 / Accepted: 26 September 2016 / Published: 30 September 2016
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Abstract
Strategies to improve the mechanical compatibility of Ti-based materials for hard tissue implant applications are directed towards significant stiffness reduction by means of the adjustment of suitable β-phases and porous device architectures. In the present study, the effect of different compaction routes of
[...] Read more.
Strategies to improve the mechanical compatibility of Ti-based materials for hard tissue implant applications are directed towards significant stiffness reduction by means of the adjustment of suitable β-phases and porous device architectures. In the present study, the effect of different compaction routes of the gas-atomized β-Ti-45Nb powder on the sample architecture, porosity, and on resulting mechanical properties in compression was investigated. Green powder compacted and sintered at 1000 °C had a porosity varying between 8% and 12%, strength between 260 and 310 MPa, and Young’s modulus ranging between 18 and 21 GPa. Hot pressing of the powder without or with subsequent sintering resulted in microporosity varying between 1% and 3%, ultimate strength varying between 635 and 735 MPa, and Young’s modulus between 55 and 69 GPa. Samples produced with NaCl space-holder by hot-pressing resulted in a macroporosity of 45% and a high strength of ˃200 MPa, which is higher than the strength of a human cortical bone. Finally, the corrosion tests were carried out to prove that the presence of residual NaCl traces will not influence the performance of the porous implant in the human body. Full article
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Tool Wear and Life Span Variations in Cold Forming Operations and Their Implications in Microforming
Technologies 2017, 5(1), 3; doi:10.3390/technologies5010003
Received: 4 November 2016 / Revised: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 21 December 2016 / Published: 27 December 2016
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Abstract
The current paper aims to review tooling life span, failure modes and models in cold microforming processes. As there is nearly no information available on tool-life for microforming the starting point was conventional cold forming. In cold forming common failures are (1) over
[...] Read more.
The current paper aims to review tooling life span, failure modes and models in cold microforming processes. As there is nearly no information available on tool-life for microforming the starting point was conventional cold forming. In cold forming common failures are (1) over stressing of the tool; (2) abrasive wear; (3) galling or adhesive wear, and (4) fatigue failure. The large variation in tool life observed in production and how to predict this was reviewed as this is important to the viability of microforming based on that the tooling cost takes a higher portion of the part cost. Anisotropic properties of the tool materials affect tool life span and depend on both the as-received and in-service conditions. It was concluded that preconditioning of the tool surface, and coating are important to control wear and fatigue. Properly managed, the detrimental effects from surface particles can be reduced. Under high stress low-cycle fatigue conditions, fatigue failure form internal microstructures and inclusions are common. To improve abrasive wear resistance larger carbides are commonly the solution which will have a negative impact on tooling life as these tend to be the root cause of fatigue failures. This has significant impact on cold microforming. Full article
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