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Special Issue "Supply Chain Sustainability"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Benita M. Beamon (Website)

Industrial and Systems Engineering, Box 352650, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2650, USA
Fax: +1 206 685 3072
Interests: analysis, design and performance of supply chain systems with special emphasis in sustainability, humanitarian relief and food supply networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Classical supply chain management focuses on profit-driven design and operation of a one-way flow of materials. However, regulatory pressure, public pressure, and increasingly scarce inputs have led to increased focus on ecological supply chain considerations. Such considerations must work in concert with profit-making, and range from directly reducing toxic inputs and waste streams to designing products, processes, and supply networks for efficient and effective remanufacturing, recycling, and reuse.

In the face of an increasing global population, the rise of new economies, and looming energy uncertainties, the supply chain is facing some of its most serious challenges. However, the modern supply chain also has unprecedented access to methodological and technological resources, which may help to mitigate risk. The challenge to supply chain management is to supply the ever-increasing and ever-demanding global population, while protecting the very environment that sustains us, today and for generations to come. This special issue of Sustainability focuses on supply chain sustainability, with particular interest in some of our most critical supply chain products: food, water, and energy. With this special issue, we seek to address some of the most pressing questions surrounding sustainable supply, including but not limited to: (1) the potential for the coexistence of environmental sensitivity, adequate supply, and profit-making, (2) strategies and tactics for achieving sustainability, and (3) sustainable supply chain design. Multi-disciplinary submissions addressing policy and technological/methodological aspects of supply chain sustainability are particularly encouraged.

Dr. Benita M. Beamon
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • supply chain
  • sustainability
  • environment
  • energy
  • food
  • water

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Comprehensive Approach in Assessing the Performance of an Automobile Closed-Loop Supply Chain
Sustainability 2010, 2(4), 871-889; doi:10.3390/su2040871
Received: 26 January 2010 / Revised: 20 February 2010 / Accepted: 11 March 2010 / Published: 30 March 2010
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (426 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ecological issues arising from manufacturing operations have led to the focus on environmental sustainability in manufacturing. This can be addressed adequately using a closed-loop supply chain (CLSC). To attain an effective and efficient CLSC, it is necessary to imbibe a holistic [...] Read more.
The ecological issues arising from manufacturing operations have led to the focus on environmental sustainability in manufacturing. This can be addressed adequately using a closed-loop supply chain (CLSC). To attain an effective and efficient CLSC, it is necessary to imbibe a holistic performance measurement approach. In order to achieve this, there is a need to adopt a specific approach for a particular product rather than being generic. Since sustainability has direct environmental footprints that involve organizational stakeholders, suppliers, customers and the society at large, complexities surrounding supply chain performance measurement have multiplied. In this study, a suitable approach has been proposed for CLSC performance measurement in the automotive industry, based on reviewed literature. It is believed that this approach will result in increased effectiveness and efficiency in CLSC performance measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle Supply Chain Management and Sustainability: Procrastinating Integration in Mainstream Research
Sustainability 2010, 2(4), 859-870; doi:10.3390/su2040859
Received: 10 January 2010 / Revised: 2 February 2010 / Accepted: 25 February 2010 / Published: 25 March 2010
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (224 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research has pointed out opportunities and research agendas to integrate sustainability issues with supply chain and operations management. However, we find that it is still not mainstream practice to systematically take a sustainability approach in tackling supply chain and operations management issues. [...] Read more.
Research has pointed out opportunities and research agendas to integrate sustainability issues with supply chain and operations management. However, we find that it is still not mainstream practice to systematically take a sustainability approach in tackling supply chain and operations management issues. In this paper, we make use of behavioral theory to explain the current lack of integration. We conclude through abductive reasoning that the reasons for procrastinating integration of sustainability in supply chain and operations management research are the conflicting nature of the task and the inherent context, which is the focus on operations rather than environmental or social issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Sustainability)

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