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Special Issue "Innovation and Environmental Sustainability"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bart A.G. Bossink (Website)

VU University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Department of Information, Logistics and Innovation, De Boelelaan 1105, Room 5A-22, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: environmentally sustainable innovation; sustainable construction; environmental design; environmental policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Editorial objectives and coverage of this special issue:

The special issue contributes to theory building, evaluation and testing in the field of environmentally sustainable innovation management in business by means of theory driven and empirically based business research.
The special issue publishes studies that focus on analytical generalization and statistical generalization, on qualitative and quantitative research methods, and on theory building and theory testing.

Who should react:

Scholars conducting business research in environmentally sustainable
innovation management in business.

Key research areas covered in the special issue:

  • Individual leadership/championship for environmentally sustainable innovation in organizations
  • Environmentally sustainable innovation processes in organizations
  • Organization and organizational forms for environmentally sustainable innovation
  • Environmentally sustainable innovation strategies for organizations
  • Inter-organizational cooperation for environmentally sustainable innovation
  • Business networks for environmentally sustainable innovation
  • National systems of environmentally sustainable innovation

Prof. Dr. Bart A.G. Bossink
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • innovation
  • management
  • change
  • sustainability
  • environment
  • green
  • business

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-3
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Research

Open AccessArticle Polymer Recovery from Auto Shredder Residue by Projectile Separation Method
Sustainability 2012, 4(4), 643-655; doi:10.3390/su4040643
Received: 29 February 2012 / Revised: 31 March 2012 / Accepted: 4 April 2012 / Published: 16 April 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (683 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The number of vehicles on the road has been increasing at an enormous rate over the last decade. By 2015, the number of vehicles that reach the end of their life will be close to a million per year in Australia. Most [...] Read more.
The number of vehicles on the road has been increasing at an enormous rate over the last decade. By 2015, the number of vehicles that reach the end of their life will be close to a million per year in Australia. Most metallic parts of the vehicle can be recycled but the plastic components and components of other materials are normally shredded and disposed in landfills. As more vehicles are using composite materials, the percentage of materials sent to landfill is alarming. This paper reviews existing polymer recycling techniques for End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) and proposes a more efficient electrostatic based projectile separation method. The test rig is at the preliminary stage of development and initial outcomes are promising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Environmental Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle An R&D Management Framework for Eco-Technology
Sustainability 2011, 3(8), 1282-1301; doi:10.3390/su3081282
Received: 28 April 2011 / Revised: 14 July 2011 / Accepted: 16 August 2011 / Published: 24 August 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (430 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although research and development (R&D) affects new value-added creation, including that related to environmental aspects, there is little literature dealing with the integration of R&D management and eco-value. Here, eco-value of technology is defined as the advantage of environmental competitiveness in the market. This paper proposes a framework of R&D management of eco-technology (RDMOET), consisting of: (1) future research for sustainability; (2) making an original eco-theme portfolio and roadmap; (3) gap analysis and implementation of new eco-themes; and (4) eco-value evaluation. (1) and (4) are new processes compared with conventional R&D management. Through practice at the Corporate R&D Center of Toshiba Corporation, the usefulness of the proposed framework is verified from the viewpoint of not only technological eco-innovation, but also that of organizational learning for environmental sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Environmental Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle Environmental Innovation and Sustainability in Small Handicraft Businesses in Mexico
Sustainability 2011, 3(7), 984-1002; doi:10.3390/su3070984
Received: 3 May 2011 / Revised: 5 July 2011 / Accepted: 6 July 2011 / Published: 14 July 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (723 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the relationship between environmental innovation and sustainability is analyzed in 168 handicraft businesses in the Mexican states of Oaxaca, Puebla, and Tlaxcala. The results show a direct, positive relationship between environmental innovation and sustainability in three dimensions: economic, social, [...] Read more.
In this study, the relationship between environmental innovation and sustainability is analyzed in 168 handicraft businesses in the Mexican states of Oaxaca, Puebla, and Tlaxcala. The results show a direct, positive relationship between environmental innovation and sustainability in three dimensions: economic, social, and environmental. In terms of determination, the variables that best explain sustainability are: organization type, product innovation, and process innovation. The age of the handicraft businesses was not a significant factor in explaining sustainability. This study concludes that handicraft businesses make sustainable choices more as a result of a desire for profit maximization than as a result of environmental consciousness, as can be explained by neoclassical view of economics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Environmental Sustainability)

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Sustainability Editorial Office
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sustainability@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
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