Special Issue "War/Wars and Society"

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A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Michael H. Creswell

Department of History, 401 Bellamy Building, 113 Collegiate Loop, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2200, USA
E-Mail
Phone: +1 850 644 9532
Fax: +1 850 644 6402
Interests: Cold War; diplomatic history; military history; strategy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

War has been with humankind even before recorded history. Over the centuries, conflict has touched all corners of the globe, while its scope and regularity have continued even after the advent of civil society. During this time, we have come to understand that the effects of war extend beyond the battlefield. Indeed, we now know that war affects each of us, sometimes in unique personal ways, other times in a shared experience. At a mass level, war shapes our educational systems, our industries, our entertainment, our medical services, our gender structures, and our politics. It is also associated with poverty, colonization, genocide, and systematic exploitation. At the individual level, war has touched millions, including combatants who bear physical, emotional, and psychological wounds, as well as their friends and families who seek to care for them. The cost of war is incalculable, as there is no way to put a price on loss and suffering. One of our collective goals ought to be to try to better understand the nexus of war and society before we embark upon new wars and to better adapt to past and current conflicts. This special issue offers a critical insight into war and society and how each one has affected the other in both the past and the present. Contributors will examine various aspects of war and society, including art, memory, and perceptions of femininity and masculinity, in ways that will enlighten us all.

Professor Michael H. Creswell
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • War and Society
  • Civil-Military Relations
  • War Refugees
  • Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Integration of Armed Forces
  • Wartime Propaganda and Censorship
  • War Memorials and Remembrance
  • The Home front
  • Domestic Mobilization
  • Security and Civil Rights

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Vocalizing the Angels of Mons: Audio Dramas as Propaganda in the Great War of 1914 to 1918
Societies 2014, 4(2), 180-221; doi:10.3390/soc4020180
Received: 3 June 2013 / Revised: 20 April 2014 / Accepted: 28 April 2014 / Published: 8 May 2014
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Abstract
Sound drama production prior to the onset of the “Radio Age” underwent a pioneering development during the Great War. This was achieved by the making, publication and distribution of short audio dramas acted with sound effects and music in front of early microphones
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Sound drama production prior to the onset of the “Radio Age” underwent a pioneering development during the Great War. This was achieved by the making, publication and distribution of short audio dramas acted with sound effects and music in front of early microphones and released in the form of 78 rpm phonograph discs. Entertaining storytelling through dramatic performance was mobilized for the purposes of improving recruitment and disseminating patriotic endorsement recordings. This article focuses on the sound dramatization of the myth of “The Angels of Mons” released by Regal in 1915. The recording is examined as a text for its significance in terms of propaganda, style of audio-drama, and any cultural role it may have played in the media of the First World War. The Regal disc was an example of what was described at the time as “descriptive sketches.” This article explores why a sound phonograph was used to dramatize the myth that angels intervened to assist the British Expeditionary Force to resist the German Army invading France through Belgium in 1914. A number of historians have discussed the First World War as being a theatre for the first modern media war, in which the process of propaganda was modernized. To what extent does “The Angels of Mons” phonograph and the genre of descriptive sketches support this analysis? Does this short sound drama play have any relevance to the cultural phenomena of spiritualism, modernism and patriotic Christianity identified as being important during the Great War period? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue War/Wars and Society)
Open AccessArticle The French Participation in the Korean War and the Establishment of a “Path of Memory” in South Korea
Societies 2013, 3(4), 427-444; doi:10.3390/soc3040427
Received: 14 August 2013 / Revised: 9 October 2013 / Accepted: 9 October 2013 / Published: 5 November 2013
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Abstract
The contribution to the Korean War of medium powers or declining great powers like France has been scarcely investigated in-depth despite France’s marked contribution to the conflict, both diplomatically and militarily. Though its contribution modest by way of the number of troops sent
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The contribution to the Korean War of medium powers or declining great powers like France has been scarcely investigated in-depth despite France’s marked contribution to the conflict, both diplomatically and militarily. Though its contribution modest by way of the number of troops sent to Korea and discreet on the diplomatic field, the French part in the war was significant, because it demonstrated the solidarity of the Allied powers united in the newly-established NATO. Moreover, the French battalions sent to Korea fought with gallantry and gained many medals, including silver stars. From the beginning of the 2000s, this overlooked history began to be noticed with the building of a “Path of the Living Memory of the French Contribution to the Korean War”. It was intended to inform visitors about a part of history, to transmit memory, and to strengthen friendship between France and Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue War/Wars and Society)
Open AccessArticle From Labour to National Ideals: Ending the War in Asia Minor—Controlling Communism in Greece
Societies 2013, 3(4), 348-382; doi:10.3390/soc3040348
Received: 22 July 2013 / Revised: 16 October 2013 / Accepted: 17 October 2013 / Published: 21 October 2013
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Abstract
This paper will try to shed light on a very particular angle of Greek political geography after the end of the Asia Minor War. As a result of this conflict almost 1.3 million refugees fled to Greece and changed dramatically its political space.
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This paper will try to shed light on a very particular angle of Greek political geography after the end of the Asia Minor War. As a result of this conflict almost 1.3 million refugees fled to Greece and changed dramatically its political space. The traditional view among the scholars of the period promotes an “exceptionalism” of the Greek-Orthodox refugees who fled to Greece after 1922. It is argued that the Asia Minor workers did not largely espouse an a priori notion of class, since they had a bourgeoisie economic and social background. However, in the 1930s there was a sharp increase in the support of the Left. Accordingly, the Communist Party pulled 5.76% of the vote, which was the highest in the inter-war period. Although the percentage of the communist vote was not so high all over Greece, Communism had a real electorate appeal for urban refugees. This study will challenge the exceptionalist perspective and will investigate why the same people who voted for Liberals in the 1920s voted for Communists in the 1930s. It will also examine how the Greek political system managed to incorporate the left-wing vote by transforming the division of society from labour and political demands to national ones in the period under examination. The focus will be also on the interplay between Communism and refugees, which is undervalued by most research on the topic, even though the communist threat was used as a reason or pretext for the abolition of parliamentary democracy and the establishment of Ioannis Metaxas’ dictatorship in 1936. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue War/Wars and Society)
Open AccessArticle Improving Early Detection of Refugee-Related Stress Symptoms: Evaluation of an Inter-Professional and Inter-Cultural Skills Training Course in Sweden
Societies 2013, 3(2), 204-216; doi:10.3390/soc3020204
Received: 28 February 2013 / Revised: 7 April 2013 / Accepted: 3 May 2013 / Published: 8 May 2013
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Abstract
Twenty-three of 26 participants, mainly women from six local agencies involved in the reception of refugees, completed a university course titled “Refugee-related stress and mental health—local cooperation”, which was spread over seven days in 2011. The course was based on evidence and clinical
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Twenty-three of 26 participants, mainly women from six local agencies involved in the reception of refugees, completed a university course titled “Refugee-related stress and mental health—local cooperation”, which was spread over seven days in 2011. The course was based on evidence and clinical experience and was commissioned to serve as competency training by Stockholm County Council and Södertälje Municipality. It received funding from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. It was a continuation of an earlier one-week full-time university course from 2010 with the same title. As a result of a new law relating to refugee reception, which led to organizational change, the participants requested a continuation of the original course. The learning objectives were met (5.4 on a 6-point scale; 1 = strongly disagree, 6 = strongly agree). The general assessment of the course as a whole by the participants was 5.7 (on a 6-point scale, 1 = very unsatisfied, 6 = very satisfied). The participants thought that their skills had increased, and their perception was that they had significantly better control of their work situation following completion of the course. The most important findings were that participants from different agencies at the local level: (1) perceived that they had developed the sense that there was a local inter-cultural and inter-professional inter-agency collaboration in the reception of newly arrived refugees and (2) will continue efforts to stabilize and develop this together. This method of teaching, in terms of skills training, is not a “quick fix.” It is a process, and it needs support from those in power in order to continue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue War/Wars and Society)
Open AccessArticle Circuits of Memory: The War Memory Boom in Western Australia
Societies 2012, 2(3), 84-100; doi:10.3390/soc2030084
Received: 30 May 2012 / Revised: 31 July 2012 / Accepted: 2 August 2012 / Published: 7 August 2012
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Abstract
In some Australian academic circles in the 1980s it was believed that, as the numbers of soldiers of the world wars declined over time, so would attendances at war remembrance ceremonies on Anzac Day and interest in war commemoration in general. Contrary to
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In some Australian academic circles in the 1980s it was believed that, as the numbers of soldiers of the world wars declined over time, so would attendances at war remembrance ceremonies on Anzac Day and interest in war commemoration in general. Contrary to expectation, however, there has been a steady rise in eagerness for war memory in Australia over the past three decades manifest in media interest and increasing attendance at Anzac Day services. Rather than dying out, ‘Anzac’ is being reinvented for new generations. Emerging from this phenomenon has been a concomitant rise in war memorial and commemorative landscape building across Australia fuelled by government funding (mostly federal) and our relentless search for a national story. Many more memorial landscapes have been built in Western Australia over the past thirty years than at the end of either of the World Wars, a trend set to peak in 2014 with the Centenary of Anzac. This paper examines the origins and progress of this boom in memorial building in Western Australia and argues that these new memorial settings establish ‘circuits of memory’ which ultimately re-enchant and reinforce the Anzac renaissance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue War/Wars and Society)

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