Special Issue "Ionic Liquid for Separations"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jonathan Albo

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electro-and-photocatalytic reduction of CO2; membrane separation processes; ionic liquids; environmental sustainability assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of ionic liquids (ILs) has blossomed in the last few decades due to their unique properties, including immeasurably low vapor pressure, high thermal stability and excellent solvation ability for a wide range of compounds. Consequently, ILs are considered attractive replacements for volatile organic solvents in multiple applications, including separation and purification, catalysis or extraction processes, among others. In addition, their physical and chemical properties can be fine-tuned by an adequate selection of the cation and anion constituents, for that reason ILs has been described as design solvents (i.e., “task-specific” ILs).

In line with the increasing attention that this family of compounds has attracted recently, the present Special Issue reports on the most important and latest fundamental and technological advances in separation processes using ILs. 

Dr. Jonathan  Albo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ionic liquids
  • gas separations
  • supported membranes
  • extractions
  • supercritical fluids
  • electrochemical devices
  • chromatographic techniques
  • molecular simulations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Electrochemical Characterization of a Polymer Inclusion Membrane Made of Cellulose Triacetate and Aliquat 336 and Its Application to Sulfonamides Separation
Received: 23 November 2017 / Revised: 19 December 2017 / Accepted: 20 December 2017 / Published: 15 January 2018
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Abstract
An electrochemical characterization of a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) fabricated with the ionic liquid (IL) Aliquat 336 (26%) and the polymer cellulose triacetate (CTA) (76%) is presented. Considering the use of PIMs in separation systems to remove pollutants from water, the characterization was
[...] Read more.
An electrochemical characterization of a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) fabricated with the ionic liquid (IL) Aliquat 336 (26%) and the polymer cellulose triacetate (CTA) (76%) is presented. Considering the use of PIMs in separation systems to remove pollutants from water, the characterization was performed with NaCl solutions by measuring membrane potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and salt diffusion and results were compared with those obtained from dry membranes. Results showed a significant reduction in the membrane diffusive permeability and electrical conductivity as well as the transport number of cation Na+ across the PIM when compared with solution values, which could be mainly related to the dense character of the membrane. Membrane application in the separation of different sulfonamides (sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole) from water, with 1 M NaCl solution as striping phase, was also considered. These results indicated that the different chemical characteristics of the compounds, as well as the compact structure of the PIM, limited the transport of the organic molecules though it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ionic Liquid for Separations)
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Open AccessArticle Capillary Electrophoresis as Analysis Technique for Battery Electrolytes: (i) Monitoring Stability of Anions in Ionic Liquids and (ii) Determination of Organophosphate-Based Decomposition Products in LiPF6-Based Lithium Ion Battery Electrolytes
Separations 2017, 4(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations4030026
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 17 August 2017 / Accepted: 24 August 2017 / Published: 5 September 2017
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Abstract
In this work, a method for capillary electrophoresis (CE) hyphenated to a high-resolution mass spectrometer was presented for monitoring the stability of anions in ionic liquids (ILs) and in commonly used lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolytes. The investigated ILs were 1-methyl-1-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR13TFSI)
[...] Read more.
In this work, a method for capillary electrophoresis (CE) hyphenated to a high-resolution mass spectrometer was presented for monitoring the stability of anions in ionic liquids (ILs) and in commonly used lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolytes. The investigated ILs were 1-methyl-1-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR13TFSI) and 1-methyl-1-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (PYR13FSI). The method development was conducted by adjusting the following parameters: buffer compositions, buffer concentrations, and the pH value. Also the temperature and the voltage applied on the capillary were optimized. The ILs were aged at room temperature and at 60 °C for 16 months each. At both temperatures, no anionic decomposition products of the FSI− and TFSI− anions were detected. Accordingly, the FSI− and TFSI− anions were thermally stable at these conditions. This method was also applied for the investigation of LIB electrolyte samples, which were aged at 60 °C for one month. The LP30 (50/50 wt. % dimethyl carbonate/ethylene carbonate and 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate) electrolyte was mixed with the additive 1,3-propane sultone (PS) and with one of the following organophosphates (OP): dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), and triethyl phosphate (TEP), to investigate the influence of these compounds on the formation of OPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ionic Liquid for Separations)
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