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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fan Ren

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116005 Gainesville, FL 32611-6005, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ZnO nanowires for sensing and device applications; AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based sensors; oxide based optical and electronic devices; InGaAs based MSM detector; AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors(HEMTs) passivation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue provides a forum for the latest research in semiconductor based sensors for gas, chemical, and bio detection, and various medical applications. It features a balance between theoretical and experimental research in basic device physics, novel materials and device structures, sensor fabrication and the transformation of research into products. The chemical sensor market represents the largest segment of the global sensor market, and semiconductor based sensors fabricated using mature micro-fabrication techniques and novel nanotechnologies are the major contestants within this sector. Silicon based sensors remain dominant due to their low cost, reproducibility, controllable electronic behaviors, and abundant data of chemical treatments on silicon oxide or glass. Wide band-gap based compound semiconductor sensors are suitable to be operated in harsh environments, for instance, high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive ambient. Nanomaterial devices so far have provided the best alternatives for fast, label-free, sensitive, selective and multiple detections for both preclinical and clinical applications. Results from Si, wide energy bandgap semiconductor devices, metal oxide and nanomaterial based sensors are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Fan Ren
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • sensor simulation and modeling
  • sensor packaging
  • electrochemical sensors
  • wireless sensors
  • micro-electro-mechanical (MSM) detectors
  • toxin detection
  • sensor surface functionalization
  • gas sensors
  • biological and biomedical sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle SnO2/Pt Thin Film Laser Ablated Gas Sensor Array
Sensors 2011, 11(8), 7724-7735; doi:10.3390/s110807724
Received: 5 June 2011 / Revised: 5 July 2011 / Accepted: 21 July 2011 / Published: 5 August 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1777 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A gas sensor array was developed in a 10 × 10 mm2 space using Screen Printing and Pulse Laser Ablation Deposition (PLAD) techniques. Heater, electrode, and an insulator interlayer were printed using the screen printing method on an alumina substrate, while tin
[...] Read more.
A gas sensor array was developed in a 10 × 10 mm2 space using Screen Printing and Pulse Laser Ablation Deposition (PLAD) techniques. Heater, electrode, and an insulator interlayer were printed using the screen printing method on an alumina substrate, while tin oxide and platinum films, as sensing and catalyst layers, were deposited on the electrode at room temperature using the PLAD method, respectively. To ablate SnO2 and Pt targets, depositions were achieved by using a 1,064 nm Nd-YAG laser, with a power of 0.7 J/s, at different deposition times of 2, 5 and 10 min, in an atmosphere containing 0.04 mbar (4 kPa) of O2. A range of spectroscopic diffraction and real space imaging techniques, SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM were used in order to characterize the surface morphology, structure, and composition of the films. Measurement on the array shows sensitivity to some solvent and wood smoke can be achieved with short response and recovery times. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle Investigation of a Photoelectrochemical Passivated ZnO-Based Glucose Biosensor
Sensors 2011, 11(5), 4648-4655; doi:10.3390/s110504648
Received: 22 February 2011 / Revised: 27 March 2011 / Accepted: 22 April 2011 / Published: 28 April 2011
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (496 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A vapor cooling condensation system was used to deposit high quality intrinsic ZnO thin films and intrinsic ZnO nanorods as the sensing membrane of extended-gate field-effect-transistor (EGFET) glucose biosensors. The sensing sensitivity of the resulting glucose biosensors operated in the linear range was
[...] Read more.
A vapor cooling condensation system was used to deposit high quality intrinsic ZnO thin films and intrinsic ZnO nanorods as the sensing membrane of extended-gate field-effect-transistor (EGFET) glucose biosensors. The sensing sensitivity of the resulting glucose biosensors operated in the linear range was 13.4 μA mM−1 cm−2. To improve the sensing sensitivity of the ZnO-based glucose biosensors, the photoelectrochemical method was utilized to passivate the sidewall surfaces of the ZnO nanorods. The sensing sensitivity of the ZnO-based glucose biosensors with passivated ZnO nanorods was significantly improved to 20.33 μA mM−1 cm−2 under the same measurement conditions. The experimental results verified that the sensing sensitivity improvement was the result of the mitigation of the Fermi level pinning effect caused by the dangling bonds and the surface states induced on the sidewall surface of the ZnO nanorods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Optimization of Urea-EnFET Based on Ta2O5 Layer with Post Annealing
Sensors 2011, 11(5), 4562-4571; doi:10.3390/s110504562
Received: 4 March 2011 / Revised: 30 March 2011 / Accepted: 11 April 2011 / Published: 27 April 2011
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (614 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the urea-enzymatic field effect transistors (EnFETs) were investigated based on pH-ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) sensing membranes. In addition, a post N2 annealing was used to improve the sensing properties.
[...] Read more.
In this study, the urea-enzymatic field effect transistors (EnFETs) were investigated based on pH-ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) sensing membranes. In addition, a post N2 annealing was used to improve the sensing properties. At first, the pH sensitivity, hysteresis, drift, and light induced drift of the ISFETs were evaluated. After the covalent bonding process and urease immobilization, the urea sensitivity of the EnFETs were also investigated and compared with the conventional Si3N4 sensing layer. The ISFETs and EnFETs with annealed Ta2O5 sensing membranes showed the best responses, including the highest pH sensitivity (56.9 mV/pH, from pH 2 to pH 12) and also corresponded to the highest urea sensitivity (61 mV/pCurea, from 1 mM to 7.5 mM). Besides, the non-ideal factors of pH hysteresis, time drift, and light induced drift of the annealed samples were also lower than the controlled Ta2O5 and Si3N4 sensing membranes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Sensors)

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