Special Issue "Advances in Biomimetic Robotics"

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A special issue of Robotics (ISSN 2218-6581).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ikuo Yamamoto

Department of Mechanical Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyomachi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
Interests: robotics (marine, aviation, space, medicine, welfare, etc.); system engineering (dynamics and control)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Living organisms’ mechanisms have evolved in order to adapt to their natural environment. The evolved mechanisms have excellent maneuvering capacities, and new robotics and machinery have often been created by implementation of biomimetic approaches. This special issue, therefore, focuses on technologies of modern biomimetic robotics, such as robotic fish, insects, birds, mammalians, reptiles, etc., to provide fruitful ideas for the creation of the next generation of machinery in society.

Prof. Dr. Ikuo Yamamoto
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been extended substantially and completely re-written). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Robotics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • biomimetic robots (fish, insect, bird, mammalian, reptile)

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Robust Nonlinear Regulation of Limit Cycle Oscillations in UAVs Using Synthetic Jet Actuators
Robotics 2014, 3(4), 330-348; doi:10.3390/robotics3040330
Received: 31 May 2014 / Revised: 22 July 2014 / Accepted: 15 August 2014 / Published: 26 September 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (483 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, a synthetic jet actuators (SJA)-based nonlinear robust controller is developed, which is capable of completely suppressing limit cycle oscillations (LCO) in UAV systems with parametric uncertainty in the SJA dynamics and unmodeled external disturbances. Specifically, the control law compensates [...] Read more.
In this paper, a synthetic jet actuators (SJA)-based nonlinear robust controller is developed, which is capable of completely suppressing limit cycle oscillations (LCO) in UAV systems with parametric uncertainty in the SJA dynamics and unmodeled external disturbances. Specifically, the control law compensates for uncertainty in an input gain matrix, which results from the unknown airflow dynamics generated by the SJA. Challenges in the control design include compensation for input-multiplicative parametric uncertainty in the actuator dynamic model. The result was achieved via innovative algebraic manipulation in the error system development, along with a Lyapunov-based robust control law. A rigorous Lyapunov-based stability analysis is utilized to prove asymptotic LCO suppression, considering a detailed dynamic model of the pitching and plunging dynamics. Numerical simulation results are provided to demonstrate the robustness and practical performance of the proposed control law. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biomimetic Robotics)
Open AccessArticle Neural Networks Integrated Circuit for Biomimetics MEMS Microrobot
Robotics 2014, 3(3), 235-246; doi:10.3390/robotics3030235
Received: 31 March 2014 / Revised: 23 May 2014 / Accepted: 18 June 2014 / Published: 25 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC) which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated [...] Read more.
In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC) which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated by micro fabrication technology. The mechanical system of the robot was equipped with small size rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and six legs to realize the ant-like switching behavior. The NNIC generates the driving waveform using synchronization phenomena such as biological neural networks. The driving waveform can operate the actuators of the MEMS microrobot directly. Therefore, the NNIC bare chip realizes the robot control without using any software programs or A/D converters. The microrobot performed forward and backward locomotion, and also changes direction by inputting an external single trigger pulse. The locomotion speed of the microrobot was 26.4 mm/min when the step width was 0.88 mm. The power consumption of the system was 250 mWh when the room temperature was 298 K. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biomimetic Robotics)
Open AccessArticle Design Issues for Hexapod Walking Robots
Robotics 2014, 3(2), 181-206; doi:10.3390/robotics3020181
Received: 31 March 2014 / Revised: 7 May 2014 / Accepted: 15 May 2014 / Published: 10 June 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1548 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hexapod walking robots have attracted considerable attention for several decades. Many studies have been carried out in research centers, universities and industries. However, only in the recent past have efficient walking machines been conceived, designed and built with performances that can be [...] Read more.
Hexapod walking robots have attracted considerable attention for several decades. Many studies have been carried out in research centers, universities and industries. However, only in the recent past have efficient walking machines been conceived, designed and built with performances that can be suitable for practical applications. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art on hexapod walking robots by referring both to the early design solutions and the most recent achievements. Careful attention is given to the main design issues and constraints that influence the technical feasibility and operation performance. A design procedure is outlined in order to systematically design a hexapod walking robot. In particular, the proposed design procedure takes into account the main features, such as mechanical structure and leg configuration, actuating and driving systems, payload, motion conditions, and walking gait. A case study is described in order to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed design procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biomimetic Robotics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Aerodynamic Bio-Mimetics of Gliding Dragonflies for Ultra-Light Flying Robot
Robotics 2014, 3(2), 163-180; doi:10.3390/robotics3020163
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 24 April 2014 / Accepted: 16 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2842 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A detailed investigation including a low-speed flow study is presented on the development of ultra-light dragonfly mimetic flying robots with a focus on the dragonfly’s remarkable gliding capability. It is revealed that the dragonfly’s corrugated wing structure and cruciform configuration provide superior [...] Read more.
A detailed investigation including a low-speed flow study is presented on the development of ultra-light dragonfly mimetic flying robots with a focus on the dragonfly’s remarkable gliding capability. It is revealed that the dragonfly’s corrugated wing structure and cruciform configuration provide superior flying characteristics for fixed wing robots in low Reynolds number flight. It was also found that the dragonfly configuration has additional merit in its compatibility with propellers or high lift devices. This combination with such classic aero-engineering makes possible robots with broader flight envelope than conventional fixed-wing flying robots. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biomimetic Robotics)
Open AccessArticle Position Estimation of Small Robotic Fish Based on Camera Information and Gyro Sensors
Robotics 2014, 3(2), 149-162; doi:10.3390/robotics3020149
Received: 25 February 2014 / Revised: 27 March 2014 / Accepted: 3 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3870 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Robotic fish are ideal for surveying fish resources and performing underwater structural inspections. If a robot is sufficiently fishlike in appearance and does not use a screw propeller, real fish will not be easily surprised by it. However, it is comparatively difficult [...] Read more.
Robotic fish are ideal for surveying fish resources and performing underwater structural inspections. If a robot is sufficiently fishlike in appearance and does not use a screw propeller, real fish will not be easily surprised by it. However, it is comparatively difficult for such a robot to determine its own position in water. Radio signals, such as those used by GPS, cannot be easily received. Moreover, sound ranging is impractical because of the presence of rocks and waterweed in places where fish spend a lot of time. For practical applications such as photographing fish, a robotic fish needs to follow the target fish without losing awareness of its own position, in order to be able to swim autonomously. We have developed a robotic fish named FOCUS (FPGA Offline Control Underwater Searcher) which is equipped with two CMOS cameras and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) circuit board for data processing. The forward-facing camera is used to track red objects, since this is the color of the fish of interest. In addition, using visual information obtained with the bottom-facing camera, the robot can estimate its present position. This is achieved by performing real-time digital image correlation using the FPGA. However, until now, the position estimation accuracy has been poor due to the influence of yaw and roll. In the present study, the position estimation method has been greatly improved by taking into account the yaw and roll values measured using gyro sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biomimetic Robotics)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


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