E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Organic Solar Cells"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Robert. P. H. Chang

Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Cook Hall 2036, Office - Cook 2011, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Nanjia Zhou

Northwestern University, 2137 Sheridan Road, Catalysis Center 125, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic solar cells are an important family of third generation photovoltaic technology and have stimulated extensive interest in the solar cell research community. Organic solar cells typically contain a mixture of an electron donor and an electron acceptor; either one or both of them are organic semiconductors (molecular or polymeric materials). These solar cells are light-weight, inexpensive, and compatible with large-scale roll-to-roll fabrication. Fueled by multidisciplinary research efforts, the past five years have seen a rapid advancement in their performance.

This Special Issue on “Organic Solar Cells” will discuss state-of-the-art topics concerning organic solar cells (e.g., the design and synthesis of organic semiconductors, material characterization, device photophysics and characterization, the design and fabrication of novel device architectures, etc.). The Special Issue will be of great interest to the organic solar cell research community. Your contribution to the issue will be greatly appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Robert P. H. Chang
Dr. Nanjia Zhou
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Optical Characterization of the Hole Polaron in a Series of Diketopyrrolopyrrole Polymers Used for Organic Photovoltaics
Polymers 2015, 7(1), 69-90; doi:10.3390/polym7010069
Received: 22 August 2014 / Accepted: 12 December 2014 / Published: 31 December 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4622 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A strategy that is often used for designing low band gap polymers involves the incorporation of electron-rich (donor) and electron-deficient (acceptor) conjugated segments within the polymer backbone. In this paper we investigate such a series of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based co-polymers. The co-polymers consisted of
[...] Read more.
A strategy that is often used for designing low band gap polymers involves the incorporation of electron-rich (donor) and electron-deficient (acceptor) conjugated segments within the polymer backbone. In this paper we investigate such a series of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based co-polymers. The co-polymers consisted of a DPP unit attached to a phenylene, naphthalene, or anthracene unit. Additionally, polymers utilizing either the thiophene-flanked DPP or the furan-flanked DPP units paired with the naphthalene comonomer were compared. As these polymers have been used as donor materials and subsequent hole transporting materials in organic solar cells, we are specifically interested in characterizing the optical absorption of the hole polaron of these DPP based copolymers. We employ chemical doping, electrochemical doping, and photoinduced absorption (PIA) studies to probe the hole polaron absorption spectra. While some donor-acceptor polymers have shown an appreciable capacity to generate free charge carriers upon photoexcitation, no polaron signal was observed in the PIA spectrum of the polymers in this study. The relations between molecular structure and optical properties are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Interfacial Layer Engineering for Performance Enhancement in Polymer Solar Cells
Polymers 2015, 7(2), 333-372; doi:10.3390/polym7020333
Received: 28 November 2014 / Revised: 6 January 2015 / Accepted: 9 February 2015 / Published: 17 February 2015
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (5003 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Improving power conversion efficiency and device performance stability is the most critical challenge in polymer solar cells for fulfilling their applications in industry at large scale. Various methodologies have been developed for realizing this goal, among them interfacial layer engineering has shown great
[...] Read more.
Improving power conversion efficiency and device performance stability is the most critical challenge in polymer solar cells for fulfilling their applications in industry at large scale. Various methodologies have been developed for realizing this goal, among them interfacial layer engineering has shown great success, which can optimize the electrical contacts between active layers and electrodes and lead to enhanced charge transport and collection. Interfacial layers also show profound impacts on light absorption and optical distribution of solar irradiation in the active layer and film morphology of the subsequently deposited active layer due to the accompanied surface energy change. Interfacial layer engineering enables the use of high work function metal electrodes without sacrificing device performance, which in combination with the favored kinetic barriers against water and oxygen penetration leads to polymer solar cells with enhanced performance stability. This review provides an overview of the recent progress of different types of interfacial layer materials, including polymers, small molecules, graphene oxides, fullerene derivatives, and metal oxides. Device performance enhancement of the resulting solar cells will be elucidated and the function and operation mechanism of the interfacial layers will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Open AccessReview Solar Paint: From Synthesis to Printing
Polymers 2014, 6(11), 2832-2844; doi:10.3390/polym6112832
Received: 12 September 2014 / Revised: 22 October 2014 / Accepted: 4 November 2014 / Published: 13 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2465 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water-based polymer nanoparticle dispersions (solar paint) offer the prospect of addressing two of the main challenges associated with printing large area organic photovoltaic devices; namely, how to control the nanoscale architecture of the active layer and eliminate the need for hazardous organic solvents
[...] Read more.
Water-based polymer nanoparticle dispersions (solar paint) offer the prospect of addressing two of the main challenges associated with printing large area organic photovoltaic devices; namely, how to control the nanoscale architecture of the active layer and eliminate the need for hazardous organic solvents during device fabrication. In this paper, we review progress in the field of nanoparticulate organic photovoltaic (NPOPV) devices and future prospects for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells based on this technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Open AccessReview Morphological Control Agent in Ternary Blend Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells
Polymers 2014, 6(11), 2784-2802; doi:10.3390/polym6112784
Received: 15 September 2014 / Revised: 16 October 2014 / Accepted: 23 October 2014 / Published: 3 November 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (8354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) promise low cost solar energy and have caused an explosive increase in investigations during the last decade. Control over the 3D morphology of BHJ blend films in various length scales is one of the pillars accounting for
[...] Read more.
Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) promise low cost solar energy and have caused an explosive increase in investigations during the last decade. Control over the 3D morphology of BHJ blend films in various length scales is one of the pillars accounting for the significant advance of OPV performance recently. In this contribution, we focus on the strategy of incorporating an additive into BHJ blend films as a morphological control agent, i.e., ternary blend system. This strategy has shown to be effective in tailoring the morphology of BHJ through different inter- and intra-molecular interactions. We systematically review the morphological observations and associated mechanisms with respect to various kinds of additives, i.e., polymers, small molecules and inorganic nanoparticles. We organize the effects of morphological control (compatibilization, stabilization, etc.) and provide general guidelines for rational molecular design for additives toward high efficiency and high stability organic solar cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Open AccessReview Fused-Thiophene Based Materials for Organic Photovoltaics and Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells
Polymers 2014, 6(10), 2645-2669; doi:10.3390/polym6102645
Received: 10 September 2014 / Revised: 7 October 2014 / Accepted: 15 October 2014 / Published: 22 October 2014
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1150 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have drawn great interest from both academics and industry, due to the possibility of low-cost conversion of photovoltaic energy at reasonable efficiencies. This review focuses on recent progress in molecular engineering and technological aspects of
[...] Read more.
Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have drawn great interest from both academics and industry, due to the possibility of low-cost conversion of photovoltaic energy at reasonable efficiencies. This review focuses on recent progress in molecular engineering and technological aspects of fused-thiophene-based organic dye molecules for applications in solar cells. Particular attention has been paid to the design principles and stability of these dye molecules, as well as on the effects of various electrolyte systems for DSSCs. Importantly, it has been found that incorporation of a fused-thiophene unit into the sensitizer has several advantages, such as red-shift of the intramolecular charge transfer band, tuning of the frontier molecular energy level, and improvements in both photovoltaic performance and stability. This work also examines the correlation between the physical properties and placement of fused-thiophene in the molecular structure with regard to their performance in OPVs and DSSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Open AccessReview Towards High Performance Organic Photovoltaic Cells: A Review of Recent Development in Organic Photovoltaics
Polymers 2014, 6(9), 2473-2509; doi:10.3390/polym6092473
Received: 28 July 2014 / Revised: 16 September 2014 / Accepted: 19 September 2014 / Published: 25 September 2014
Cited by 34 | PDF Full-text (5624 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) have been a hot topic for research during the last decade due to their promising application in relieving energy pressure and environmental problems caused by the increasing combustion of fossil fuels. Much effort has been made toward understanding the
[...] Read more.
Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) have been a hot topic for research during the last decade due to their promising application in relieving energy pressure and environmental problems caused by the increasing combustion of fossil fuels. Much effort has been made toward understanding the photovoltaic mechanism, including evolving chemical structural motifs and designing device structures, leading to a remarkable enhancement of the power conversion efficiency of OPVs from 3% to over 15%. In this brief review, the advanced progress and the state-of-the-art performance of OPVs in very recent years are summarized. Based on several of the latest developed approaches to accurately detect the separation of electron-hole pairs in the femtosecond regime, the theoretical interpretation to exploit the comprehensive mechanistic picture of energy harvesting and charge carrier generation are discussed, especially for OPVs with bulk and multiple heterojunctions. Subsequently, the novel structural designs of the device architecture of OPVs embracing external geometry modification and intrinsic structure decoration are presented. Additionally, some approaches to further increase the efficiency of OPVs are described, including thermotics and dynamics modification methods. Finally, this review highlights the challenges and prospects with the aim of providing a better understanding towards highly efficient OPVs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Solar Cells)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Polymers Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
polymers@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Polymers
Back to Top