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Special Issue "Polymer Colloids"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Hsing-Lin Wang

Department of Material Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 505 667 0851
Interests: polymer synthesis (conjugated polymers and fullerenes); processing and applications of conjugated polymers; polymer nanofibers and colloids; polymer/metal composites; polymeric sensors and actuators; polyeletrolyte (supramolecular) self-assembly
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ping Xu

Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92 West Dazhi St., Nangang Dist., Harbin 150001, China
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +86 451 8641 3702
Fax: +86 451 8641 8750
Interests: conjugated polymer applications; electrocatalysis; laser chemistry; surface enhanced Raman scattering; directed self-assembly and hierarchical structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional polymers possess combined physical, chemical and mechanical properties and functionalities taking advantage of their conductive, optical, electronic and biomedical features. Some functional polymers also reveal stimuli responsive properties that are subject to change upon exposure to external stimuli such as temperature, pH, and light. Perturbation of local environment can lead to change in polymer conformation, structure, and aggregated states that render them be used as smart materials. Polymer colloids allow further expansion of applications of functional polymers as they can be easily processed and adopted for conjugation with a variety of biomolecules. Hierarchical self-assemblies comprised of polymer colloids show applications as photonic materials with tunability simply by changing the size of the colloids. Recent studies also suggest that nanoscaled polymer colloids have similar application potentials as semiconducting quantum dots. In recent years, polymer colloids have emerged as one of the most promising materials due to their size and morphology -dependent properties, and the feasibility for chemical modification that allows exploration of emergent phenomena and commercial applications.

In view of the recent developments in polymer colloids, this specific issue solicits papers relating to the synthesis, processing, self-assembly and applications of polymer colloids and hybrid composites. The topical subjects to be addressed include: micro- and nanoemulsion, polymer complexes, polymer composites, smart materials, chemical modifications, bioconjugates, and correlation between colloid structure and functionality.

Dr. Hsing-Lin Wang
Prof. Dr. Ping Xu
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • synthesis and characterization
  • polymer colloids and dispersion
  • micro and nanoemulsion
  • responsive polymers
  • polymer-surfactant complexes
  • conjugated polymers
  • hybrid polymer colloids (composites)
  • functionalization of polymer colloids
  • self-assembly of polymer colloids
  • biomedical; electronic and optical application

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle On the Relation between Natural and Enforced Syneresis of Acidic Precipitated Silica
Polymers 2014, 6(12), 2896-2911; doi:10.3390/polym6122896
Received: 11 September 2014 / Revised: 12 November 2014 / Accepted: 19 November 2014 / Published: 26 November 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5888 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Silica in industrial production processes is precipitated by mixing an acid and an inorganic precursor. In this aqueous solution, silica particles form due to a polymerization reaction and agglomeration and, finally, build a gel. Thereafter, the reaction continues, and the gel network shrinks
[...] Read more.
Silica in industrial production processes is precipitated by mixing an acid and an inorganic precursor. In this aqueous solution, silica particles form due to a polymerization reaction and agglomeration and, finally, build a gel. Thereafter, the reaction continues, and the gel network shrinks with the expulsion of the enclosed pore liquid. This slow process is known as “natural syneresis” and strongly affects the product properties, such as the agglomerate size, specific surface or porosity of the silica produced. In order to investigate the influence of process parameters, such as temperature, pH or ionic strength, on the shrinkage in shorter time-scales, we propose an acceleration of this process and define it as “enforced syneresis”. The acceleration is performed by applying a mechanical external force to the gel by means of a plunger and measuring the shrinkage behavior under these conditions. Thereby, the conceptual idea is the prediction of the shrinkage due to natural syneresis based on the results of enforced syneresis. We are now able to predict the natural syneresis behavior from enforced syneresis data by the development of a correlative model. Using this prediction model, we can show the influence of temperature on the maximum shrinkage and on its rate in a significantly shorter time of about 12 h instead of several days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
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Open AccessArticle Thermo-Responsive Injectable MPEG-Polyester Diblock Copolymers for Sustained Drug Release
Polymers 2014, 6(10), 2670-2683; doi:10.3390/polym6102670
Received: 16 September 2014 / Revised: 7 October 2014 / Accepted: 17 October 2014 / Published: 23 October 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1731 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Thermo-responsive diblock copolymers composed of hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) and hydrophobic biodegradable polyesters were prepared for application as injectable drug delivery systems, because they show a thermo-responsive sol-to-gel transition, especially around body temperature, when dispersed in aqueous solutions. The thermogelling hydrogels formed
[...] Read more.
Thermo-responsive diblock copolymers composed of hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) and hydrophobic biodegradable polyesters were prepared for application as injectable drug delivery systems, because they show a thermo-responsive sol-to-gel transition, especially around body temperature, when dispersed in aqueous solutions. The thermogelling hydrogels formed by hydrophobic aggregation could be varied by changing the components of the hydrophobic polyester part. For the polyester block in the present study, 95 mol% of ε-caprolactone (CL) was used for the main polyester chain and 5 mol% of p-dioxanone (DO) was copolymerized randomly by the MPEG initiator in the presence of HCl as the catalyst. By adding a small portion of DO into the poly ε-caprolactone (PCL) chains, the temperature range of gelation, the intensity of viscosity and the drug release behavior were changed. The MPEG-b-poly(ε-caprolactone-ran-p-dioxanone) (MPEG-b-PCDO) hydrogel showed the enhanced drug release in vitro and in vivo compared to MPEG-b-PCL hydrogel. Therefore, MPEG-polyester hydrogels may serve as minimally invasive and therapeutic, injectable hydrogel systems with adjustable temperature-responsive and biodegradable windows, as well as sustained release of drugs over a certain time period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
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Open AccessArticle Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds
Polymers 2014, 6(6), 1827-1845; doi:10.3390/polym6061827
Received: 22 May 2014 / Revised: 6 June 2014 / Accepted: 9 June 2014 / Published: 18 June 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3120 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride), we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide) through a reaction with NaN3 and then
[...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride), we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide) through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine) (PVBT) and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine) (PVBA), respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
Open AccessArticle On the Interaction of Adherent Cells with Thermoresponsive Polymer Coatings
Polymers 2014, 6(4), 1164-1177; doi:10.3390/polym6041164
Received: 2 March 2014 / Revised: 1 April 2014 / Accepted: 4 April 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (3546 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Thermoresponsive polymer coatings allow the control of adhesion of cells on synthetic substrates. In particular, decreasing the temperature below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer triggers the non-invasive detachment of cells from their cultivation substrate. Widening the range of applications
[...] Read more.
Thermoresponsive polymer coatings allow the control of adhesion of cells on synthetic substrates. In particular, decreasing the temperature below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer triggers the non-invasive detachment of cells from their cultivation substrate. Widening the range of applications of these coatings in cellular biotechnology requires a better understanding of their interaction with cells. By monitoring the morphological changes of cells during their detachment at various temperatures, we provide evidence that cell detachment is an active process. Analyses of cell residues that are left behind by the cells on the substrate during their detachment, further support this notion. In the second part of this work, we show that the kinetics of adhesion and the efficiency of detachment of cells can be controlled through the coadsorption of molecules bearing the peptide motif RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) with the polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
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Open AccessArticle Structure and Frictional Properties of Colloid Gel
Polymers 2014, 6(3), 651-666; doi:10.3390/polym6030651
Received: 23 December 2013 / Revised: 17 February 2014 / Accepted: 27 February 2014 / Published: 6 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polymer gels are known to be opaque when the preparation conditions, such as the reaction temperature and the composition, are changed. The increase of the opaqueness of the gel suggests strongly the change of network structure. Here, we are going to review the
[...] Read more.
Polymer gels are known to be opaque when the preparation conditions, such as the reaction temperature and the composition, are changed. The increase of the opaqueness of the gel suggests strongly the change of network structure. Here, we are going to review the recent studies on the structure and the frictional study of the opaque poly(acrylamide) gel. The results indicate that the opaque poly(acrylamide) gel consists of the fractal aggregate of the colloidal particles of sub-micrometer in size. The density of the colloid particle is calculated from the structural parameters and is found to be of the order of about 1 g/cm3. The results indicate that the main chain component and the cross-linker is densely cross-linked into the particle. The frictional property of poly(acrylamide) gel is analyzed in terms of the structural parameters of the gel. It is found that the frictional property of the opaque gel is well explained in terms of the structural parameters of the opaque gel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
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Open AccessArticle Enhancement Corrosion Resistance of (γ-Glycidyloxypropyl)-Silsesquioxane-Titanium Dioxide Films and Its Validation by Gas Molecule Diffusion Coefficients Using Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation
Polymers 2014, 6(2), 300-310; doi:10.3390/polym6020300
Received: 28 November 2013 / Revised: 17 January 2014 / Accepted: 20 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1454 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Based on silsesquioxanes (SSO) derived from the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPMS) and titanium tetrabutoxide (TTB), hybrid films on aluminum alloy (AA), film-GPMS-SSO (f-GS) and f-GS-TTBi% (f-GSTT5%–25%, i = 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%), were prepared
[...] Read more.
Based on silsesquioxanes (SSO) derived from the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPMS) and titanium tetrabutoxide (TTB), hybrid films on aluminum alloy (AA), film-GPMS-SSO (f-GS) and f-GS-TTBi% (f-GSTT5%–25%, i = 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%), were prepared and tested by electrochemical measurements with typical potentiodynamic polarization curves. The Icorr values of the samples were significantly lower, comparing with the Icorr values of the f-GS, AA and f-GS modified tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the previous study, which implies that the TTB5%–25% (TiO2) additions in the coatings indeed enhance the electrochemical corrosion resistance. Correlations between the film structures and anticorrosion properties were discussed. To validate the corresponding anticorrosion experiment results, different 3D-amorphous cubic unit cells were employed as models to investigate the self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) for SO2, NO2 and H2O molecules by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. All of the SDCs calculated for SO2, NO2 and H2O diffusing in f-GSTT5%–25% cells were less than the SDCs in f-GS. These results validated the corresponding anticorrosion experiment results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
Open AccessArticle Modification of a Phenolic Resin with Epoxy- and Methacrylate-Functionalized Silica Sols to Improve the Ablation Resistance of Their Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composites
Polymers 2014, 6(1), 105-113; doi:10.3390/polym6010105
Received: 16 December 2013 / Revised: 26 December 2013 / Accepted: 30 December 2013 / Published: 6 January 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1030 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Functionalized silica sols were obtained by the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-methacryloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPMS), (γ-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Three different sols were obtained: MPS (derived from MPMS and TEOS), GPS-MPS (derived from GPMS, MPMS and TEOS), and GPSD (derived from GPMS, TEOS and diglycidyl
[...] Read more.
Functionalized silica sols were obtained by the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-methacryloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPMS), (γ-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Three different sols were obtained: MPS (derived from MPMS and TEOS), GPS-MPS (derived from GPMS, MPMS and TEOS), and GPSD (derived from GPMS, TEOS and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA). These silica sols were mixed with a phenolic resin (PR). Ethylenediamine was used as a hardener for epoxy-functionalized sols and benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator of the free-radical polymerization of methacrylate-functionalized silica sols. Glass fiber-reinforced composites were obtained from the neat PR and MPS-PR, GPS-MPS-PR and GPSD-PR. The resulting composites were evaluated as ablation resistant materials in an acetylene-oxygen flame. A large increase in the ablation resistance was observed when the PR was modified by the functionalized silica sols. The ablation resistance of the composites decreased as follows: GPSD-PR > MPS-PR > GPS-MPS-PR > PR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Colloids)
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