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Special Issue "Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Do-Hoon Hwang

Department of Chemistry, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea
E-Mail
Fax: +82-51-516-7421
Interests: polymer synthesis; organic electronic materials; polymer light-emitting diodes; organic thin film transistors; organic photovoltaic devices; dye-sensitized solar cells, organic memory devices; photo-curable polymers; organic insulators; photo-resists

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Semiconducting polymers have attracted much scientific and technological research interest during the past few decades because of their potential use as electro-active materials in diverse organic electronic devices. Conjugated polymers have semiconducting properties and can replace silicon in currently using electronic devices such as transistors, photo-detectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, sensors and so on. Organic semiconductor has many potential advantages over silicon-based inorganic semiconductors including their lightweight, flexible nature, and cost-effective manufacturing process that can include various printing techniques such as roll-to-roll processing. This special issue will focus on the current state-of-the-art in the applications of semiconducting polymers in organic electronic devices. Papers are sought on research results in design, synthesis, and characterization of new semiconducting polymers especially for polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs), organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), electronic sensors, and so on.

Prof. Dr. Do-Hoon Hwang
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • semiconducting polymers
  • conjugated polymers
  • polymer light-emitting diodes
  • organic thin film transistors
  • organic photovoltaic cells
  • sensors

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Transparent Conductive Films Fabricated from Polythiophene Nanofibers Composited with Conventional Polymers
Polymers 2013, 5(4), 1325-1338; doi:10.3390/polym5041325
Received: 19 September 2013 / Revised: 31 October 2013 / Accepted: 31 October 2013 / Published: 19 November 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2095 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Transparent, conductive films were prepared by compositing poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The transparency, conductivity, atmospheric stability, and mechanical strength of the resulting nanofiber composite films when doped with AuCl3 were evaluated and compared with those of P3HT nanofiber mats.
[...] Read more.
Transparent, conductive films were prepared by compositing poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The transparency, conductivity, atmospheric stability, and mechanical strength of the resulting nanofiber composite films when doped with AuCl3 were evaluated and compared with those of P3HT nanofiber mats. The conductivity of the nanofiber composite films was 4.1 S∙cm−1, which is about seven times less than that which was previously reported for a nanofiber mat with the same optical transmittance (~80%) reported by Aronggaowa et al. The time dependence of the transmittance, however, showed that the doping state of the nanofiber composite films in air was more stable than that of the nanofiber mats. The fracture stress of the nanofiber composite film was determined to be 12.3 MPa at 3.8% strain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)
Open AccessArticle Electrochemical and Spectroelectrochemical Properties of a New Donor–Acceptor Polymer Containing 3,4-Dialkoxythiophene and 2,1,3-Benzothiadiazole Units
Polymers 2013, 5(3), 1068-1080; doi:10.3390/polym5031068
Received: 30 May 2013 / Revised: 23 July 2013 / Accepted: 5 August 2013 / Published: 12 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (801 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new heteroarylene-vinylene donor-acceptor low bandgap polymer, the poly(DEHT-V-BTD), containing vinylene-spaced efficient donor (dialkoxythiophene) and acceptor (benzothiadiazole) moieties, is presented. Electropolymerization has been carried out by several electrochemical techniques and the results are compared. In particular, the pulsed potentiostatic method was able to
[...] Read more.
A new heteroarylene-vinylene donor-acceptor low bandgap polymer, the poly(DEHT-V-BTD), containing vinylene-spaced efficient donor (dialkoxythiophene) and acceptor (benzothiadiazole) moieties, is presented. Electropolymerization has been carried out by several electrochemical techniques and the results are compared. In particular, the pulsed potentiostatic method was able to provide layers with sufficient amounts of material. Cyclic voltammetries showed reversible behavior towards both p- and n-doping. The HOMO, LUMO, and bandgap energies were estimated to be −5.3, −3.6 and 1.8 eV, respectively. In situ UV-Vis measurements have established that the presence of the vinylene group stabilizes the formation of polaronic charge carriers even at high doping levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)

Review

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Open AccessReview Organic Semiconductor/Insulator Polymer Blends for High-Performance Organic Transistors
Polymers 2014, 6(4), 1057-1073; doi:10.3390/polym6041057
Received: 11 February 2014 / Revised: 24 March 2014 / Accepted: 31 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (1664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We reviewed recent advances in high-performance organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on organic semiconductor/insulator polymer blends. Fundamental aspects of phase separation in binary blends are discussed with special attention to phase-separated microstructures. Strategies for constructing semiconductor, semiconductor/dielectric, or semiconductor/passivation layers in OFETs by
[...] Read more.
We reviewed recent advances in high-performance organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on organic semiconductor/insulator polymer blends. Fundamental aspects of phase separation in binary blends are discussed with special attention to phase-separated microstructures. Strategies for constructing semiconductor, semiconductor/dielectric, or semiconductor/passivation layers in OFETs by blending organic semiconductors with an insulating polymer are discussed. Representative studies that utilized such blended films in the following categories are covered: vertical phase-separation, processing additives, embedded semiconductor nanowires. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)
Open AccessReview Development of Polymer Acceptors for Organic Photovoltaic Cells
Polymers 2014, 6(2), 382-407; doi:10.3390/polym6020382
Received: 15 January 2014 / Revised: 6 February 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 10 February 2014
Cited by 27 | PDF Full-text (375 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review provides a current status report of the various n-type polymer acceptors for use as active materials in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). The polymer acceptors are divided into four categories. The first section of this review focuses on rylene diimide-based polymers,
[...] Read more.
This review provides a current status report of the various n-type polymer acceptors for use as active materials in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). The polymer acceptors are divided into four categories. The first section of this review focuses on rylene diimide-based polymers, including perylene diimide, naphthalene diimide, and dithienocoronene diimide-based polymers. The high electron mobility and good stability of rylene diimides make them suitable for use as polymer acceptors in OPVs. The second section deals with fluorene and benzothiadiazole-based polymers such as poly(9,9’-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole), and the ensuing section focuses on the cyano-substituted polymer acceptors. Cyano-poly(phenylenevinylene) and poly(3-cyano-4-hexylthiophene) have been used as acceptors in OPVs and exhibit high electron affinity arising from the electron-withdrawing cyano groups in the vinylene group of poly(phenylenevinylene) or the thiophene ring of polythiophene. Lastly, a number of other electron-deficient groups such as thiazole, diketopyrrolopyrrole, and oxadiazole have also been introduced onto polymer backbones to induce n-type characteristics in the polymer. Since the first report on all-polymer solar cells in 1995, the best power conversion efficiency obtained with these devices to date has been 3.45%. The overall trend in the development of n-type polymer acceptors is presented in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)
Open AccessReview Structure and Morphology Control in Thin Films of Conjugated Polymers for an Improved Charge Transport
Polymers 2013, 5(4), 1272-1324; doi:10.3390/polym5041272
Received: 26 September 2013 / Revised: 24 October 2013 / Accepted: 31 October 2013 / Published: 18 November 2013
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (19078 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The morphological and structural features of the conjugated polymer films play an important role in the charge transport and the final performance of organic optoelectronics devices [such as organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) and organic photovoltaic cell (OPV), etc.] in terms of crystallinity,
[...] Read more.
The morphological and structural features of the conjugated polymer films play an important role in the charge transport and the final performance of organic optoelectronics devices [such as organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) and organic photovoltaic cell (OPV), etc.] in terms of crystallinity, packing of polymer chains and connection between crystal domains. This review will discuss how the conjugated polymer solidify into, for instance, thin-film structures, and how to control the molecular arrangement of such functional polymer architectures by controlling the polymer chain rigidity, polymer solution aggregation, suitable processing procedures, etc. These basic elements in intrinsic properties and processing strategy described here would be helpful to understand the correlation between morphology and charge transport properties and guide the preparation of efficient functional conjugated polymer films correspondingly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)
Open AccessReview Nanomembranes and Nanofibers from Biodegradable Conducting Polymers
Polymers 2013, 5(3), 1115-1157; doi:10.3390/polym5031115
Received: 24 June 2013 / Revised: 26 August 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 17 September 2013
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (4177 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e.g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone) and conducting polymers (e.g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes). These materials have potential biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering
[...] Read more.
This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e.g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone) and conducting polymers (e.g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes). These materials have potential biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering or drug delivery systems) and can be combined to get free-standing nanomembranes and nanofibers that retain the better properties of their corresponding individual components. Systems based on biodegradable and conducting polymers constitute nowadays one of the most promising solutions to develop advanced materials enable to cover aspects like local stimulation of desired tissue, time controlled drug release and stimulation of either the proliferation or differentiation of various cell types. The first sections of the review are focused on a general overview of conducting and biodegradable polymers most usually employed and the explanation of the most suitable techniques for preparing nanofibers and nanomembranes (i.e., electrospinning and spin coating). Following sections are organized according to the base conducting polymer (e.g., Sections 4–6 describe hybrid systems having aniline, pyrrole and thiophene units, respectively). Each one of these sections includes specific subsections dealing with applications in a nanofiber or nanomembrane form. Finally, miscellaneous systems and concluding remarks are given in the two last sections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Electronic Devices)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Hybrid Solar Cells from Aqueous Colloidal Nanocrystals and Polymer Precursors
Author: Bai Yang
Affliation: State Key Lab of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Institute of Polymer Science, College of Chemsitry, Jilin University, 2699# Qianjin Ave, Changchun 130012, China; Email: byangchem@jlu.edu.cn
Abstract: Recently, photovoltaic devices based on aqueous materials are drawing more and more attention in the field of green chemistry. This review aims to present a general overview of polymer-nanocrystal hybrid photovoltaic devices based on aqueous materials. At first, all-organic polymer solar cells based on water-soluble organic polymers as the active layer are briefly introduced. After that, we focus on the recent development of hybrid solar cells from aqueous colloidal nanocrystals and polymer precursors. Finally, the vast majority of this review is devided between challenges and proposed solutions associated with the aqueou-solution-processed hybrid solar cells.

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