Special Issue "Perovskite Photovoltaic and Optoelectronics"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lioz Etgar

Institute of Chemistry , the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Casali center for applied Chemistry,The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Edmond J Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, 9190401, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: photovoltaic solar cells; physics of semiconductor materials; synthesis of nanomaterials; optical properties of nanomaterials; organic-inorganic perovskite; quantum dots; perovskite based solar cells; quantum solar cells; dye sensitized solar cells; photoactive materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent discoveries have revealed a breakthrough in the photovoltaic field using organometal perovskites as light harvesters in the solar cell. The power conversion efficiencies of perovskite based solar cells has increased dramatically in the last three years; the functionality of these cells has also increased in other optoelectronic applications. It can be argued that this material can replace current solar cell technologies.

This Special Issue is expected to cover topics related to perovskite based solar cells and the function of perovskite in optoelectronic applications, with an emphasis on fundamental understandings of the mechanisms and methods of perovskite deposition, and of optical and physical characterizations.

The papers in this Special Issue will provide knowledge on this novel material and its properties, which will contribute to the understanding of this exciting topic.

Dr. Lioz Etgar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organo – metal perovskite
  • perovskite based solar cells
  • photodetectors based perovskite
  • optoelectronic devices based perovskite
  • impedance of perovskite based solar cells
  • optical characterization of organo – metal perovskite
  • novel deposition techniques for organo – metal perovskite
  • flat and mesoporous perovskite solar cells

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Transient Response of Organo-Metal-Halide Solar Cells Analyzed by Time-Resolved Current-Voltage Measurements
Photonics 2015, 2(4), 1101-1115; doi:10.3390/photonics2041101
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 18 November 2015 / Accepted: 19 November 2015 / Published: 24 November 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (924 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The determination of the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on organo-metal-halides is subject to an ongoing debate. As solar cell devices may exhibit very slow transient response, current-voltage scans in different directions may not be congruent, which is an effect often
[...] Read more.
The determination of the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on organo-metal-halides is subject to an ongoing debate. As solar cell devices may exhibit very slow transient response, current-voltage scans in different directions may not be congruent, which is an effect often referred to as hysteresis. We here discuss time-resolved current-voltage measurements as a means to evaluate appropriate delay times (voltage settling times) to be used in current-voltage measurements of solar cells. Furthermore, this method allows the analysis of transient current response to extract time constants that can be used to compare characteristic differences between devices of varying architecture types, selective contacts and changes in devices due to storage or degradation conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Photovoltaic and Optoelectronics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Material Exchange Property of Organo Lead Halide Perovskite with Hole-Transporting Materials
Photonics 2015, 2(4), 1043-1053; doi:10.3390/photonics2041043
Received: 4 September 2015 / Revised: 24 September 2015 / Accepted: 28 September 2015 / Published: 2 October 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (783 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Using X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was confirmed that the deposition of hole-transporting materials (HTM) on a CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layer changed the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystal, which was due to the material exchanging phenomena between
[...] Read more.
Using X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was confirmed that the deposition of hole-transporting materials (HTM) on a CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layer changed the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystal, which was due to the material exchanging phenomena between the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite and HTM layers. The solvent for HTM also changed the perovskite crystal. In order to suppress the crystal change, doping by chloride ion, bromide ion and 5-aminovaleric acid was attempted. However, the doping was unable to stabilize the perovskite crystal against HTM deposition. It can be concluded that the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystal is too soft and flexible to stabilize against HTM deposition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Photovoltaic and Optoelectronics)

Review

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Open AccessReview Stability Issues on Perovskite Solar Cells
Photonics 2015, 2(4), 1139-1151; doi:10.3390/photonics2041139
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 24 November 2015 / Accepted: 25 November 2015 / Published: 27 November 2015
Cited by 42 | PDF Full-text (612 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organo lead halide perovskite materials like methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) and formamidinium lead iodide (HC(NH2)2PbI3) show superb opto-electronic properties. Based on these perovskite light absorbers, power conversion efficiencies of the perovskite
[...] Read more.
Organo lead halide perovskite materials like methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) and formamidinium lead iodide (HC(NH2)2PbI3) show superb opto-electronic properties. Based on these perovskite light absorbers, power conversion efficiencies of the perovskite solar cells employing hole transporting layers have increased from 9.7% to 20.1% within just three years. Thus, it is apparent that perovskite solar cell is a promising next generation photovoltaic technology. However, the unstable nature of perovskite was observed when exposing it to continuous illumination, moisture and high temperature, impeding the commercial development in the long run and thus becoming the main issue that needs to be solved urgently. Here, we discuss the factors affecting instability of perovskite and give some perspectives about further enhancement of stability of perovskite solar cell. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Photovoltaic and Optoelectronics)
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