Special Issue "Medicines across the Interface"

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A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. David Terry

Pharmacy Academic Practice Unit, Pharmacy Department, Birmingham Children's Hospital, Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham, B4 6NH, UK
E-Mail
Phone: +44 121 333 9793

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As you know, there is now considerable emphasis on healthcare professionals working together to ensure that medicines are optimized for the benefit of our patients. This is particularly important as the patient moves from one healthcare setting to another. Of course pharmacists in all healthcare sectors need to be central to this process. A number of service developments involving pharmacists are designed to support the goal of seamless care. A good example is medication reconciliation, which not only ensures accurate transfer of patient specific medicines information, but also facilitates genuine transfer of care. Erasing the dividing line that exists between hospital pharmacists and community pharmacists is an essential step in improving seamless care and promoting medicine’s optimization. Are you involved in cross-sector innovations? We would love to hear from you if you are developing pharmacy or related services across the interfaces of care for this special edition with the title “Medicines across the Interface.”

Dr. David Terry
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • medication optimization
  • pharmacy
  • pharmacy service hospital
  • community pharmacy services
  • care interface
  • healthcare systems
  • pharmacist
  • patient admission
  • patient discharge

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Impact of Pharmacist Facilitated Discharge Medication Reconciliation
Pharmacy 2014, 2(3), 222-230; doi:10.3390/pharmacy2030222
Received: 19 March 2014 / Revised: 15 July 2014 / Accepted: 18 July 2014 / Published: 25 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Preventable adverse drug events occur frequently at transitions in care and are a problem for many patients following hospital discharge. Many of these problems can be attributed to poor medication reconciliation. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact that direct
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Preventable adverse drug events occur frequently at transitions in care and are a problem for many patients following hospital discharge. Many of these problems can be attributed to poor medication reconciliation. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact that direct pharmacist involvement in the discharge medication reconciliation process had on medication discrepancies, patient outcomes, and satisfaction. A cohort study of 70 patients was designed to assess the impact of pharmacist facilitated discharge medication reconciliation at a 204-bed community hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan, USA. Discharge summaries were analyzed to compare patients who received standard discharge without pharmacist involvement to those having pharmacist involvement. The total number of discrepancies in the group without pharmacist involvement was significantly higher than that of the pharmacist facilitated group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicines across the Interface)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Medication Reconciliation at Discharge from Hospital: A Systematic Review of the Quantitative Literature
Pharmacy 2015, 3(2), 53-71; doi:10.3390/pharmacy3020053
Received: 6 May 2015 / Revised: 14 May 2015 / Accepted: 9 June 2015 / Published: 23 June 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (750 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Medicines reconciliation is a way to identify and act on discrepancies in patients’ medical histories and it is found to play a key role in patient safety. This review focuses on discrepancies and medical errors that occurred at point of discharge from hospital.
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Medicines reconciliation is a way to identify and act on discrepancies in patients’ medical histories and it is found to play a key role in patient safety. This review focuses on discrepancies and medical errors that occurred at point of discharge from hospital. Studies were identified through the following electronic databases: PubMed, Sciences Direct, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Reviews and CINAHL. Each of the six databases was screened from inception to end of January 2014. To determine eligibility of the studies; the title, abstract and full manuscript were screened to find 15 articles that meet the inclusion criteria. The median number of discrepancies across the articles was found to be 60%. In average patient had between 1.2–5.3 discrepancies when leaving the hospital. More studies also found a relation between the numbers of drugs a patient was on and the number of discrepancies. The variation in the number of discrepancies found in the 15 studies could be due to the fact that some studies excluded patient taking more than 5 drugs at admission. Medication reconciliation would be a way to avoid the high number of discrepancies that was found in this literature review and thereby increase patient safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicines across the Interface)

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