E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Dietary Protein and Metabolism"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Margriet Westerterp

Department of Human Biology, Nutrim, and Wageningen Centre of Food Sciences, Maastricht University, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: dietary protein and thermogenic foods; and their metabolic effects in relation to body weight regulation; aetiology of obesity in children; and subject-specific treatment of overweight in adults; including the significance of genetic background; i.e. relevant polymorphisms; food intake regulation and neuroscience; i.e. neuro-endocrinology combined with brain imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Consumption of Milk-Protein Combined with Green Tea Modulates Diet-Induced Thermogenesis
Nutrients 2011, 3(8), 725-733; doi:10.3390/nu3080725
Received: 16 June 2011 / Revised: 11 July 2011 / Accepted: 20 July 2011 / Published: 27 July 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (165 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Green tea and protein separately are able to increase diet-induced thermogenesis. Although their effects on long-term weight-maintenance were present separately, they were not additive. Therefore, the effect of milk-protein (MP) in combination with green tea on diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) was examined in 18 subjects
[...] Read more.
Green tea and protein separately are able to increase diet-induced thermogenesis. Although their effects on long-term weight-maintenance were present separately, they were not additive. Therefore, the effect of milk-protein (MP) in combination with green tea on diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) was examined in 18 subjects (aged 18–60 years; BMI: 23.0 ± 2.1 kg/m2). They participated in an experiment with a randomized, 6 arms, crossover design, where energy expenditure and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured. Green tea (GT) vs. placebo (PL) capsules were either given in combination with water or with breakfasts containing milk protein in two different dosages: 15 g (15 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 15/47/38; 1.7 MJ/500 mL), and 3.5 g (3.5 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 41/59/0; 146.4 kJ/100 mL). After measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) for 30 min, diet-induced energy expenditure was measured for another 3.5 h after the intervention. There was an overall significant difference observed between conditions (p < 0.001). Post-hoc, areas under the curve (AUCs) for diet-induced energy expenditure were significantly different (P ≤ 0.001) for GT + water (41.11 [91.72] kJ·3.5 h) vs. PL + water (10.86 [28.13] kJ·3.5 h), GT + 3.5 MP (10.14 [54.59] kJ·3.5 h) and PL + 3.5 MP (12.03 [34.09] kJ·3.5 h), but not between GT + 3.5 MP, PL + 3.5 MP and PL + water, indicating that MP inhibited DIT following GT. DIT after GT + 15 MP (167.69 [141.56] kJ·3.5 h) and PL + 15 MP (168.99 [186.56] kJ·3.5 h) was significantly increased vs. PL + water (P < 0.001), but these were not different from each other indicating that 15 g MP stimulated DIT, but inhibited the GT effect on DIT. No significant differences in RQ were seen between conditions for baseline and post-treatment. In conclusion, consumption of milk-protein inhibits the effect of green tea on DIT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Protein and Metabolism)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Dietary Proteins as Determinants of Metabolic and Physiologic Functions of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Nutrients 2011, 3(5), 574-603; doi:10.3390/nu3050574
Received: 30 March 2011 / Revised: 29 April 2011 / Accepted: 9 May 2011 / Published: 11 May 2011
Cited by 48 | PDF Full-text (335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune
[...] Read more.
Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Protein and Metabolism)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Nutrients Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
nutrients@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Nutrients
Back to Top