Special Issue "Advanced Corrosion Resistant Alloys for Energy Production, Storage, and Transportation Systems"

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A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ronald G. Ballinger (Website)

Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Interests: environmental effects on materials behavior; electrochemistry; corrosion; advanced materials for fusion systems advanced statistical and experimental techniques for experimental analysis; nuclear fuel performance analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced energy production or storage systems increasingly require that metals perform in increasingly aggressive environments. Higher temperatures, intense radiation, extreme chemistries, high stresses, aggressive duty cycles and longer life characterize advanced nuclear and fossil power, battery and other energy storage, fuel cell and propulsion systems. Conventional ferritic and austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys have given way to higher alloyed systems involving precipitation hardening to increase strength and creep resistance. A transition is also taking place in the automotive, truck and heavy equipment industry where increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions standards are requiring a shift from the traditional steels and aluminum alloys to more exotic corrosion resistant stainless steels, nickel-base and titanium alloys.

The goal of the special issue “Advanced Corrosion Resistant Alloys for Energy Production, Storage, and Transportation Systems” is to present several state of the technology papers that discuss the advances in metals development as well as the challenges associated with the use of metals in the extreme environments in the nuclear, fossil, battery, fuel cell, energy storage aircraft propulsion and ground transportation systems.

Prof. Dr. Ronald G. Ballinger
Guest Editor

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces
Metals 2012, 2(4), 450-477; doi:10.3390/met2040450
Received: 19 June 2012 / Revised: 10 September 2012 / Accepted: 1 November 2012 / Published: 15 November 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1917 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to [...] Read more.
The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is a relative movement between electrical contacts with surfaces of ignoble metal. Avoiding fretting corrosion is therefore extremely challenging in electronic devices with pluggable electrical connections. Gold is one of the most commonly used noble plating materials for high performance electrical contacts because of its high corrosion resistance and its good and stable electrical behavior. The authors have investigated different ways to minimize the consumption of gold for electrical contacts and to improve the performance of gold plating. Other plating materials often used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces are tin, nickel, silver and palladium. This paper will deal with properties and new research results of different plating materials in addition to other means used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces and the testing of corrosion resistance of electrically conductive surfaces. Full article
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