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Special Issue "Metal-Containing Polymers"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Charles E. Carraher, Jr. (Website)

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA
Fax: +1 561 297-2759

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a great need for materials that behave in new and specific ways.  These materials will be the materials for the 21st century that allow us to answer critical needs present in the environment, communication, biomedicine, transportation, etc.  Of the about 120 elements, less than 25 are non-metals.  These elements are generally cited as being metals or metal-like.  These metals exhibit a number of oxidative states, geometries, and bonding allowing a tailoring in properties that are not present in most traditional polymeric materials. While the advent of metal-containing polymeric materials  is relatively new, they have already found use in communications, lithography, catalysis, biomedicine, smart materials, conductors, piezoelectronics, electrodes, solar energy conversion, pyroelectronics, lasers, nonlinear optics, semiconductors, radiology agents, contrast agents,  etc.

This journal edition features a variety of metal-containing materials where the presence of the metal is important to the overall or specific properties and where the material, if soluble, would be polymeric.  This includes dendrimers and hyper-branched materials.

Prof. Dr. Charles E. Carraher, Jr.
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • metal-containing polymers/materials
  • organometallic polymers/materials
  • metallocene polymers/materials
  • iron/ferrocene-containing materials
  • transition metals
  • main group metals
  • polymers
  • materials
  • hyperbranched materials
  • dendrimers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Structural Consideration in Designing Organotin Polyethers to Arrest the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro
Materials 2011, 4(4), 801-815; doi:10.3390/ma4040801
Received: 11 February 2011 / Revised: 4 April 2011 / Accepted: 8 April 2011 / Published: 15 April 2011
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (232 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ability to inhibit cancer is inherent in organotin materials yet the structural relationships that regulate/direct this activity remains unknown. We measured antitumor activity using a matched pair of cell lines MDA-MB-231 cells that are estrogen-independent, estrogen receptor negative and MCF-7 cells, [...] Read more.
The ability to inhibit cancer is inherent in organotin materials yet the structural relationships that regulate/direct this activity remains unknown. We measured antitumor activity using a matched pair of cell lines MDA-MB-231 cells that are estrogen-independent, estrogen receptor negative and MCF-7 cells, a cell line that is estrogen receptor (ER) positive. Those polyethers that contained a O-phenyl unit were able to significantly inhibit the non-estrogen sensitive cell line but were much less effective against the estrogen sensitive cell line; that is, the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 showed better test results for polymers derived from diols containing the O-phenyl moiety than the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, a well-characterized estrogen receptor positive control cell line. Those polyethers that did not contain the O-phenyl unit inhibited both cell lines approximately the same. The differential activity of the O-phenyl-containing polyethers is likely due to the estrogen-sensitive cells combining with some of the organotin polyethers minimizing their ability to inhibit cell growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal-Containing Polymers)

Review

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Open AccessReview Antiviral Activity of Metal-Containing Polymers—Organotin and Cisplatin-Like Polymers
Materials 2011, 4(6), 991-1012; doi:10.3390/ma4060991
Received: 26 April 2011 / Revised: 19 May 2011 / Accepted: 26 May 2011 / Published: 27 May 2011
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (252 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polymers containing platinum and to a lesser extent tin, have repeatedly demonstrated antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo against a variety of cell and tumor types. The mechanisms responsible for the antitumor activity include inducing a delay in cell proliferation and [...] Read more.
Polymers containing platinum and to a lesser extent tin, have repeatedly demonstrated antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo against a variety of cell and tumor types. The mechanisms responsible for the antitumor activity include inducing a delay in cell proliferation and sister chromatid exchanges blocking tumor growth. As most DNA and some RNA viruses require, and even induce, infected cells to initiate DNA replication and subsequent cell division, compounds with antitumor activity will very likely also possess antiviral activity. This article examines the use of metal-containing polymers as a novel class of antivirals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal-Containing Polymers)

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