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Special Issue "Magnetic Nanoparticles"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jon Dobson (Website)

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Cell Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (ICERM), Primary Faculty, University of Florida, BMS J389, P.O. Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Fax: +1 352 273 9221

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used in biological and biomedical investigations since the 1920s when Heilbrunn and Seifritz first used the forces on these particles to examine the rheological properties of cells. Since that time, myriad uses for these particles have arisen and much progress has been made in synthesis techniques and bio-functionalization. Superparamagnetic iron oxides are routinely used in the clinic today as MRI contrast agents and are found in many pathology laboratories around the world where they are used to tag cells for cell separation and immunoassay. More recent, novel uses include binding to specific cell receptors to control cell function and stem cell differentiation for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, as well as magnetic targeting for drug and gene delivery and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This issue will cover a variety of topics related to the use of MNPs in biomedicine and examine both novel synthesis and functionalization techniques as well as their current and future uses in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy.

Prof. Dr. Jon Dobson
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • biomedical
  • superparamagnetic
  • tissue engineering
  • regenerative medicine

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Synthesis and Characterization of Multifunctional Chitosan- MnFe2O4 Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Drug Delivery
Materials 2010, 3(7), 4051-4065; doi:10.3390/ma3074051
Received: 20 May 2010 / Accepted: 1 July 2010 / Published: 13 July 2010
Cited by 40 | PDF Full-text (620 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Multifunctional nanoparticles composed of MnFe2O4 were encapsulated in chitosan for investigation of system to combine magnetically-triggered drug delivery and localized hyperthermia for cancer treatment with the previously published capacity of MnFe2O4 to be used as an [...] Read more.
Multifunctional nanoparticles composed of MnFe2O4 were encapsulated in chitosan for investigation of system to combine magnetically-triggered drug delivery and localized hyperthermia for cancer treatment with the previously published capacity of MnFe2O4 to be used as an efficient MRI contrast agent for cancer diagnosis. This paper focuses on the synthesis and characterization of magnetic MnFe2O4 nanoparticles, their dispersion in water and their incorporation in chitosan, which serves as a drug carrier. The surface of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was modified with meso-2,3-di-mercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) to develop stable aqueous dispersions. The nanoparticles were coated with chitosan, and the magnetic properties, heat generation and hydrodynamic size of chitosan-coated MnFe2O4 were evaluated for various linker concentrations and in a range of pH conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles)

Review

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Open AccessReview Magnetic Biotransport: Analysis and Applications
Materials 2010, 3(4), 2412-2446; doi:10.3390/ma3042412
Received: 1 January 2010 / Revised: 22 February 2010 / Accepted: 25 March 2010 / Published: 30 March 2010
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (2854 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Magnetic particles are finding increasing use in bioapplications, especially as carrier particles to transport biomaterials such as proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and whole cells etc. Magnetic particles can be prepared with biofunctional coatings to target and label a specific biomaterial, and [...] Read more.
Magnetic particles are finding increasing use in bioapplications, especially as carrier particles to transport biomaterials such as proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and whole cells etc. Magnetic particles can be prepared with biofunctional coatings to target and label a specific biomaterial, and they enable controlled manipulation of a labeled biomaterial using an external magnetic field. In this review, we discuss the use of magnetic nanoparticles as transport agents in various bioapplications. We provide an overview of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and their functionalization for bioapplications. We discuss the basic physics and equations governing the transport of magnetic particles at the micro- and nanoscale. We present two different transport models: a classical Newtonian model for predicting the motion of individual particles, and a drift-diffusion model for predicting the behavior of a concentration of nanoparticles that takes into account Brownian motion. We review specific magnetic biotransport applications including bioseparation, drug delivery and magnetofection. We demonstrate the transport models via application to these processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles)
Open AccessReview Magnetic and Optical Properties of Submicron-Size Hollow Spheres
Materials 2010, 3(2), 1244-1268; doi:10.3390/ma3021244
Received: 30 December 2009 / Revised: 2 February 2010 / Accepted: 19 February 2010 / Published: 21 February 2010
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (778 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Magnetic hollow spheres with a controlled diameter and shell thickness have emerged as an important class of magnetic nanomaterials. The confined hollow geometry and pronouncedly curved surfaces induce unique physical properties different from those of flat thin films and solid counterparts. In [...] Read more.
Magnetic hollow spheres with a controlled diameter and shell thickness have emerged as an important class of magnetic nanomaterials. The confined hollow geometry and pronouncedly curved surfaces induce unique physical properties different from those of flat thin films and solid counterparts. In this paper, we focus on recent progress on submicron-size spherical hollow magnets (e.g., cobalt- and iron-based materials), and discuss the effects of the hollow shape and the submicron size on magnetic and optical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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