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Special Issue "ICKEM2018 - Hierarchically Structured Materials (HSM)"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Alexander M. Korsunsky

Department of Engineering Science University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: prosthodontics; dental implants; dental tissues; micromechanics; caries; microscopy; radiology; X-rays

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 8th International Conference on Key Engineering Materials (ICKEM 2018) (http://www.ickem.org/) will be held, 16–18 March, 2018, at the Osaka International Convention Center, Osaka, Japan. This meeting will be organized by the International Association of Computer Science & Information Technology (IACSIT), and co-organized by the University [DM1] of the Ryukyus, Kyushu, and the Branch of the Society of Materials Science, Japan.

Previous ICKEM meetings were held in Sanya (China), Singapore, Kota Kinabalu (Malaysia), Bali (Indonesia), Singapore[DM2] , Hong Kong, and Penang (Malaysia), from 2011 to 2017. With the experience of running successful events in the ICKEM series over the past seven years, we are confident that 2018 will be an even greater success.

The purpose of the 8th International Conference on Key Engineering Materials is to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested in the whole range of fields related to the materials that underpin modern technologies. Papers presenting original works are invited on the topics listed below.

  1. Biomaterials in Different Applications
  2. Novel Composite Materials in Vivid Applications
  3. Application of Novel Materials in Civil Engineering
  4. Advances in Materials and Manufacturing Technology
  5. Materials and Technologies in Environmental Engineering
  6. Studies on Corrosion, Coating, and Aspects of Chemical Engineering
  7. Electrical, Electronic, and Optoelectronic Materials: Synthesis and Applications
  8. Trends in the Development of Nanomaterials, Nanocomposites and Nanotechnology

For this edition of the ICKEM meeting, the conference chair, Professor Alexander M. Korsunsky from the University of Oxford, UK, proposed the topic of Hierarchically-Structured Materials (HSM) as the focal theme.

Natural and engineered materials that enjoy widespread successful use in highly-demanding applications are distinguished by multi-level hierarchical structuring across scales. Beginning with the chemical elements and molecular building blocks that form a material, inherent properties are determined using the intricate composite architectures found at the nano- and micro-scales, which govern macroscopic properties and performance.

A number of simulation frameworks have been put forward in order to model the material structure and behavior at each length scale under consideration. Similarly, a variety of techniques have been elaborated for experimental characterization and testing, with sensitivity and resolution appropriate for each length scale involved. While this view of multi-scale materials modelling and characterization is widely accepted and used, there are a number of conceptual, theoretical, and applied challenges that remain unresolved, e.g., rigorous definition of distinct structural scale, robust approach to the validation of multi-scale modelling frameworks, etc. In an attempt to advance our understanding in these areas, the conference chair has organized a workshop devoted to Hierarchically-Structured Materials (HSM), in which specific research results by conference participants will be presented and examined in the light of the framework outlined above. This volume will include contributions to this overarching theme from the conference chair, Professor Alexander M. Korsunsky, and his collaborators.

Prof. Alexander Korsunsky
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials in Different Applications
  • Novel Composite Materials in Vivid Applications
  • Application of Novel Materials in Civil Engineering
  • Advances in Materials and Manufacturing Technology
  • Materials and Technologies in Environmental Engineering
  • Studies on Corrosion, Coating, and Aspects of Chemical Engineering
  • Electrical, Electronic, and Optoelectronic Materials: Synthesis and Applications
  • Trends in the Development of Nanomaterials, Nanocomposites and Nanotechnology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Preparation and Experimental Evaluation of Phase-Change Characteristics in Carbon-Based Suspensions
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1315; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081315
Received: 7 July 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 30 July 2018
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Abstract
In this study, micro/nanocarbon-based materials (MNCBMs) were prepared using the high-pressure combustion method (HPCM) with an isoperibol oxygen bomb calorimeter at different oxygen pressures (0.5–3.0 MPa). The prepared MNCBMs were added to water to form carbon-based suspensions (CBSs); sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS)
[...] Read more.
In this study, micro/nanocarbon-based materials (MNCBMs) were prepared using the high-pressure combustion method (HPCM) with an isoperibol oxygen bomb calorimeter at different oxygen pressures (0.5–3.0 MPa). The prepared MNCBMs were added to water to form carbon-based suspensions (CBSs); sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and defoamer were added to the CBSs to enhance their stability. The thermal conductivity, viscosity, density, and contact angle of the CBSs were measured using appropriate instruments to determine their fundamental characteristics. The phase-change characteristics of the CBSs were measured and analyzed using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) to evaluate the feasibility of employing them as phase-change materials in ice-storage air-conditioning systems. The results revealed that the maximal change ratios of thermal conductivity, viscosity, density, and contact angle of the samples were −3.15%, 6.25%, 0.23%, and −57.03%, respectively, as compared with the water. The CBS of S5 (oxygen pressure of 2.0 MPa) had the lowest melting temperature and subcooling degree (SD) and the highest freezing temperature in the experiments conducted using the DSC; thus, S5 was determined to be the most suitable CBS for use as a phase-change material of cold energy storage in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ICKEM2018 - Hierarchically Structured Materials (HSM))
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Open AccessArticle Nanoscale Origins of the Size Effect in the Compression Response of Single Crystal Ni-Base Superalloy Micro-Pillars
Materials 2018, 11(4), 561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040561
Received: 25 March 2018 / Revised: 3 April 2018 / Accepted: 4 April 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
PDF Full-text (50443 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nickel superalloys play a pivotal role in enabling power-generation devices on land, sea, and in the air. They derive their strength from coherent cuboidal precipitates of the ordered γ’ phase that is different from the γ matrix in composition, structure and properties. In
[...] Read more.
Nickel superalloys play a pivotal role in enabling power-generation devices on land, sea, and in the air. They derive their strength from coherent cuboidal precipitates of the ordered γ’ phase that is different from the γ matrix in composition, structure and properties. In order to reveal the correlation between elemental distribution, dislocation glide and the plastic deformation of micro- and nano-sized volumes of a nickel superalloy, a combined in situ nanoindentation compression study was carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on micro- and nano-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of Ni-base superalloy CMSX4. The observed mechanical response (hardening followed by softening) was correlated with the progression of crystal slip that was revealed using FIB nano-tomography and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping. A hypothesis was put forward that the dependence of material strength on the size of the sample (micropillar diameter) is correlated with the characteristic dimension of the structural units (γ’ precipitates). By proposing two new dislocation-based models, the results were found to be described well by a new parameter-free Hall–Petch equation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ICKEM2018 - Hierarchically Structured Materials (HSM))
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Digital Image Correlation of 2D X-ray Powder Diffraction Data for Lattice Strain Evaluation
Materials 2018, 11(3), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030427
Received: 19 February 2018 / Revised: 11 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
PDF Full-text (2094 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
High energy 2D X-ray powder diffraction experiments are widely used for lattice strain measurement. The 2D to 1D conversion of diffraction patterns is a necessary step used to prepare the data for full pattern refinement, but is inefficient when only peak centre position
[...] Read more.
High energy 2D X-ray powder diffraction experiments are widely used for lattice strain measurement. The 2D to 1D conversion of diffraction patterns is a necessary step used to prepare the data for full pattern refinement, but is inefficient when only peak centre position information is required for lattice strain evaluation. The multi-step conversion process is likely to lead to increased errors associated with the ‘caking’ (radial binning) or fitting procedures. A new method is proposed here that relies on direct Digital Image Correlation analysis of 2D X-ray powder diffraction patterns (XRD-DIC, for short). As an example of using XRD-DIC, residual strain values along the central line in a Mg AZ31B alloy bar after 3-point bending are calculated by using both XRD-DIC and the conventional ‘caking’ with fitting procedures. Comparison of the results for strain values in different azimuthal angles demonstrates excellent agreement between the two methods. The principal strains and directions are calculated using multiple direction strain data, leading to full in-plane strain evaluation. It is therefore concluded that XRD-DIC provides a reliable and robust method for strain evaluation from 2D powder diffraction data. The XRD-DIC approach simplifies the analysis process by skipping 2D to 1D conversion, and opens new possibilities for robust 2D powder diffraction data analysis for full in-plane strain evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ICKEM2018 - Hierarchically Structured Materials (HSM))
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