E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Compounds from Cyanobacteria II"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Michele R. Prinsep

Department of Chemistry, The University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products chemistry; application of spectral methods to structural determination; biologically active compounds and structure-activity relationships; chemical ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are an ancient and successful group of organisms that are found in a wide range of marine and freshwater habitats and in conditions as extreme as the heat of volcanic regions to the colds of Antarctica. They have proven to be an excellent source of secondary metabolites, many of which possess biological activity. The most common class of compounds found in cyanobacteria are oligopeptides (predominantly cyclic peptides). These are synthesised by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and many contain unique or unusual amino acids. Some of the other compound classes that have been isolated from cyanobacteria include terpenes and alkaloids.

Many of the natural products produced by cyanobacteria may be ecologically significant and some of the toxic metabolites are a human health concern, especially when present in recreational water bodies or fisheries. Cyanobacteria often have the means to produce many more metabolites than are actually expressed, so an understanding of biosynthesis and genetics in these organisms is vitally important.

There is considerable overlap between metabolites produced by terrestrial and marine cyanobacteria, hence the scope of this Special Issue has been widened to include compounds from freshwater cyanobacteria, in addition to studies of marine species. However, manuscripts describing studies of freshwater cyanobacteria with no obvious relevance to marine species will not be considered.

Assoc. Prof. Michele R. Prinsep
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanobacteria
  • blue-green algae
  • algal bloom
  • oligopeptides
  • amino acids
  • non-ribosomal peptide synthesis
  • biological activity
  • biosynthesis
  • secondary metabolites
  • toxins

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Cyanobacteria as Nanogold Factories: Chemical and Anti-Myocardial Infarction Properties of Gold Nanoparticles Synthesized by Lyngbya majuscula
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(6), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16060217
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 20 June 2018
PDF Full-text (3859 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To the best of our knowledge, cyanobacterial strains from the Arabian Gulf have never been investigated with respect to their potential for nanoparticle production. Lyngbya majuscula was isolated from the AlOqair area, Al-Ahsa Government, Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The cyanobacterium was
[...] Read more.
To the best of our knowledge, cyanobacterial strains from the Arabian Gulf have never been investigated with respect to their potential for nanoparticle production. Lyngbya majuscula was isolated from the AlOqair area, Al-Ahsa Government, Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The cyanobacterium was initially incubated with 1500 mg/mL of HAuCl4 for two days. The blue-green strain turned purple, which indicated the intracellular formation of gold nanoparticles. Prolonged incubation for over two months triggered the extracellular production of nanogold particles. UV-visible spectroscopy measurements indicated the presence of a resonance plasmon band at ~535 nm, whereas electron microscopy scanning indicated the presence of gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 41.7 ± 0.2 nm. The antioxidant and anti-myocardial infarction activities of the cyanobacterial extract, the gold nanoparticle solution, and a combination of both were investigated in animal models. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg, SC (sub cutaneous)) was injected into experimental rats for three days to induce a state of myocardial infarction; then the animals were given cyanobacterial extract (200 mg/kg/day, IP (intra peritoneal)), gold nanoparticles (200 mg/kg/day, IP), ora mixture of both for 14 days. Cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, and antioxidant enzymes were determined as indicators of myocardial infarction. The results showed that isoproterenol elevates ST and QT segments and increases heart rate and serum activities of creatine phosphokinase (CPK), creatine kinase-myocardial bound (CP-MB), and cardiac troponin T (cTnT). It also reduces heart tissue content of glutathione peroxidase (GRx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the arterial pressure indices of systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Gold nanoparticles alone or in combination with cyanobacterial extract produced an inhibitory effect on isoproterenol-induced changes in serum cardiac injury markers, ECG, arterial pressure indices, and antioxidant capabilities of the heart. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compounds from Cyanobacteria II)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Inhibitors of Serine Proteases from a Microcystis sp. Bloom Material Collected from Timurim Reservoir, Israel
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(12), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15120371
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 19 November 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Two new natural products, micropeptin TR1058 (1) and aeruginosin TR642 (2), were isolated from the hydrophilic extract of bloom material of Microcystis sp. collected from the Timurim water reservoir in Israel. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were
[...] Read more.
Two new natural products, micropeptin TR1058 (1) and aeruginosin TR642 (2), were isolated from the hydrophilic extract of bloom material of Microcystis sp. collected from the Timurim water reservoir in Israel. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HR ESI MS and MS/MS techniques. Micropeptin TR1058 (1) was extremely unstable under the isolation conditions, and several degradation products were identified. NMR analysis of aeruginosin TR642 (2) revealed a mixture of eight isomers, and elucidation of its structure was challenging. Aeruginosin TR642 contains a 4,5-didehydroaraginal subunit that has not been described before. Micropeptin TR1058 (1) inhibited chymotrypsin with an IC50 of 6.78 µM, and aeruginosin TR642 (2) inhibited trypsin and thrombin with inhibition concentration (IC50) values of 3.80 and 0.85 µM, respectively. The structures and biological activities of the new compounds are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compounds from Cyanobacteria II)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Tricholides A and B and Unnarmicin D: New Hybrid PKS-NRPS Macrocycles Isolated from an Environmental Collection of Trichodesmium thiebautii
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(7), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15070206
Received: 10 May 2017 / Revised: 10 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (828 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Bioassay-guided isolation of the lipophilic extract of Trichodesmium thiebautii bloom material led to the purification and structure characterization of two new hybrid polyketide-non-ribosomal peptide (PKS-NRPS) macrocyclic compounds, tricholides A and B (1 and 2). A third macrocyclic compound, unnarmicin D (
[...] Read more.
Bioassay-guided isolation of the lipophilic extract of Trichodesmium thiebautii bloom material led to the purification and structure characterization of two new hybrid polyketide-non-ribosomal peptide (PKS-NRPS) macrocyclic compounds, tricholides A and B (1 and 2). A third macrocyclic compound, unnarmicin D (3), was identified as a new depsipeptide in the unnarmicin family, given its structural similarity to the existing compounds in this group. The planar structures of 13 were determined using 1D and 2D NMR spectra and complementary spectroscopic and spectrometric procedures. The absolute configurations of the amino acid components of 13 were determined via acid hydrolysis, derivitization with Marfey’s reagent and HPLC-UV comparison to authentic amino acid standards. The absolute configuration of the 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid moiety in 3 was determined using a modified Mosher’s esterification procedure on a linear derivative of tricharmicin (4) and additionally by a comparison of 13C NMR shifts of 3 to known depsipeptides with β-hydroxy acid subunits. Tricholide B (2) showed moderate cytotoxicity to Neuro-2A murine neuroblastoma cells (EC50: 14.5 ± 6.2 μM). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compounds from Cyanobacteria II)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top