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Special Issue "Bioconversion of Marine Resources"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. San-Lang Wang

Department of Chemistry/Life Science Development Center, Tamkang University, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: marine chitin; applied microbiology; enzyme inhibitors; antidiabetic drugs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine-originated food is a unique source of nutrients. However, many parts of these marine bioresources, such as heads, bones, viscera, and shells, are discarded during processing despite the high levels of nutrients, and particularly micro-nutrients, found in these parts. Thus, the promotion of these unutilized marine bioresources using microbial technology, enzyme technology, or chemical modification to create high-quality food and bioactive materials could help reduce malnutrition. In this Special Issue, we focus on the reclamation of unutilized marine bioresources by biotechnology using microorganisms, enzymes, chemical procedures. With the opening of this Special Issue, “Bioconverion of Marine Bioresources”, we are planning to produce a strong, and very exciting issue that will encompass breakthroughs on highly valuable, scientific, and industrial research in this field.

For this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, we urge you to consider publishing your review paper or original research in the areas listed below:

  • Microbial conversion of marine bioresources for the production of bioactive materials
  • Enzymatic conversion of marine bioresources for the production of bioactive materials
  • Chemical conversion of marine bioresources for the production of bioactive materials

Prof. Dr. San-Lang Wang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbial conversion
  • enzymatic conversion
  • chemical modification
  • marine processing by-products
  • bioactive materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Production of Fish Protein Hydrolysates from Scyliorhinus canicula Discards with Antihypertensive and Antioxidant Activities by Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Mathematical Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(10), 306; doi:10.3390/md15100306
Received: 25 August 2017 / Revised: 19 September 2017 / Accepted: 4 October 2017 / Published: 10 October 2017
PDF Full-text (1634 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Fish discards are of major concern in new EU policies. Alternatives for the management of the new biomass that has to be landed is compulsory. The production of bioactive compounds from fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) has been explored in recent years. However, the
[...] Read more.
Fish discards are of major concern in new EU policies. Alternatives for the management of the new biomass that has to be landed is compulsory. The production of bioactive compounds from fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) has been explored in recent years. However, the viability of Scyliorhinus canicula discards, which might account for up to 90–100% of captures in mixed trawler, gillnet, and longline industrial fisheries, to produce FPH from the muscle with bioactivities has still not been studied in terms of the optimization of the experimental conditions to enhance its production. The effect of pH and temperature on the hydrolysis of the S. canicula muscle was mediated by three commercial proteases using response surface methodology. Temperatures of 64.6 °C and 60.8 °C and pHs of 9.40 and 8.90 were established as the best hydrolysis conditions for Alcalase and Esperase, respectively. Optimization of the best conditions for the maximization of antihypertensive and antioxidant activities was performed. Higher Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was found with Esperase. The pH optimum and temperature optimum for antioxidants were 55 °C/pH8.0 for ABTS/DPPH-Esperase, 63.1 °C/pH9.0 for DPPH-Alcalase, and 55 °C/pH9.0 for ABTS-Alcalase. No hydrolysis was detected when using Protamex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioconversion of Marine Resources)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Utilization of Fishery Processing By-Product Squid Pens for α-Glucosidase Inhibitors Production by Paenibacillus sp.
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(9), 274; doi:10.3390/md15090274
Received: 29 July 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 26 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
PDF Full-text (922 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The supernatants (the solution part received after centrifugation) of squid pens fermented by four species of Paenibacillus showed potent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidases derived from yeast (79–98%) and rats (76–83%). The inhibition of acarbose—a commercial antidiabetic drug, used against yeast and rat α-glucosidases—was
[...] Read more.
The supernatants (the solution part received after centrifugation) of squid pens fermented by four species of Paenibacillus showed potent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidases derived from yeast (79–98%) and rats (76–83%). The inhibition of acarbose—a commercial antidiabetic drug, used against yeast and rat α-glucosidases—was tested for comparison; it showed inhibitory activity of 64% and 88%, respectively. Other chitinolytic or proteolytic enzyme-producing bacterial strains were also used to ferment squid pens, but no inhibition activity was detected from the supernatants. Paenibacillus sp. TKU042, the most active α-glucosidase inhibitor (aGI)-producing strain, was selected to determine the optimal cultivation parameters. This bacterium achieved the highest aGI productivity (527 µg/mL) when 1% squid pens were used as the sole carbon/nitrogen source with a medium volume of 130 mL (initial pH 6.85) in a 250 mL flask (48% of air head space), at 30 °C for 3–4 d. The aGI productivity increased 3.1-fold after optimization of the culture conditions. Some valuable characteristics of Paenibacillus aGIs were also studied, including pH and thermal stability and specific inhibitory activity. These microbial aGIs showed efficient inhibition against α-glucosidases from rat, yeast, and bacteria, but weak inhibition against rice α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 362, 252, 189, and 773 µg/mL, respectively. In particular, these aGIs showed highly stable activity over a large pH (2–13) and temperature range (40–100 °C). Various techniques, including: Diaoin, Octadecylsilane opened columns, and preparative HPLC coupled with testing bioactivity resulted in isolating a main active compound; this major inhibitor was identified as homogentisic acid (HGA). Notably, HGA was confirmed as a new inhibitor, a non-sugar-based aGI, and as possessing stronger activity than acarbose with IC50, and maximum inhibition values of 220 μg/mL, 95%, and 1510 μg/mL, 65%, respectively. These results suggest that squid pens, an abundant and low-cost fishery processing by-product, constitute a viable source for the production of antidiabetic materials via fermentation by strains of Paenibacillus. This fermented product shows promising applications in diabetes or diabetes related to obesity treatment due to their stability, potent bioactivity, and efficient inhibition against mammalian enzymes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioconversion of Marine Resources)
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