Special Issue "Biomimetic Materials"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kalpana S. Katti (Website)

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering North Dakota State University CIE Building, Room 201 Fargo, ND 58108-6050 USA
Phone: 7012319504

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomimetic materials have been of interest for many applications, ranging from structural and biomedical ones, to sensor technology and communications. Materials scientists and engineers have been intrigued by the inherent redundancy, self-healing properties, and stimulus-driven responsiveness of biological systems; these properties arise from their nano-composite, hierarchically-organized structures. The hierarchical organization of porosities in bone, response-driven fouling capability of barnacles, interlocked brick and mortar organization of mineral platelets in nacre, and the tiered hierarchy of the collagen molecule in human bone, are all examples of the unique and exceptional properties of biosystems, which researchers strive to both analyze and mimic. Recent advances in advanced characterization tools, as well as efforts in the multi-scale modeling of response of biological materials’, show great promise towards furthering the development of new materials that mimic the forms and/or functions of biological structures and materials.

This special issue seeks contributions regarding new advances in the structural, molecular, and organizational details of the biological world, as well as research mimicking the structures and/or functions of these biomimetic systems. Advances in novel manufacturing techniques and novel biomimetic materials design would be appropriate; studies involving advances in new characterizations and superior models of property prediction are also welcome.

Dr. Kalpana S. Katti
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • biomimetics
  • biological materials
  • nacre, bone, wood, sea urchin spine, antifouling biomimetic coatings
  • multiscale modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Hydrodynamically Lubricated and Grooved Biomimetic Self-Adapting Surfaces
J. Funct. Biomater. 2014, 5(2), 78-98; doi:10.3390/jfb5020078
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 12 May 2014 / Accepted: 26 May 2014 / Published: 4 June 2014
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Abstract
In many machines and mechanical components, there is a need for new bearing technologies to reduce friction and wear, and provide precision control of motion when the load is varied. This can be provided by electronically controlled actuators and sensors on the [...] Read more.
In many machines and mechanical components, there is a need for new bearing technologies to reduce friction and wear, and provide precision control of motion when the load is varied. This can be provided by electronically controlled actuators and sensors on the surfaces, but then the system reliability can be an issue. In contrast, biomimetic surfaces can be created that adapt mechanically to variations in load. This work uses numerical methods to research the use of self-adapting surfaces for bearings that are based on the deformable nature of biological materials such as articular cartilage. These surfaces are designed to change their profiles to achieve a desired behavior, without any external control. The surfaces change their profile to control the film height and tilt of the bearing to a near constant value for different loads. If the surfaces are tilted, the grooved self-adapting surfaces will also react with a larger restoring moment than a conventional grooved surface. These surfaces could be beneficial to applications where electrical systems and controls are not feasible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Materials)
Open AccessArticle Smooth Muscle Cell Functionality on Collagen Immobilized Polycaprolactone Nanowire Surfaces
J. Funct. Biomater. 2014, 5(2), 58-77; doi:10.3390/jfb5020058
Received: 14 March 2014 / Revised: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 8 May 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inhibition of smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and preservation of a differentiated state are important aspects in the management, avoidance and progression of vascular diseases. An understanding of the interaction between SMCs and the biomaterial involved is essential for a successful implant. [...] Read more.
Inhibition of smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and preservation of a differentiated state are important aspects in the management, avoidance and progression of vascular diseases. An understanding of the interaction between SMCs and the biomaterial involved is essential for a successful implant. In this study, we have developed collagen immobilized nanostructured surfaces with controlled arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires for the growth and maintenance of human aortic SMCs. The nanowire surfaces were fabricated from polycaprolactone and were immobilized with collagen. The objective of this study is to reveal how SMCs interact with collagen immobilized nanostructures. The results indicate significantly higher cellular adhesion on nanostructured and collagen immobilized surfaces; however, SMCs on nanostructured surfaces exhibit a more elongated phenotype. The reduction of MTT was significantly lower on nanowire (NW) and collagen immobilized NW (colNW) surfaces, suggesting that SMCs on nanostructured surfaces may be differentiated and slowly dividing. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal that SMCs on nanostructured surfaces are more elongated and that cells are interacting with the nano-features on the surface. After providing differentiation cues, heavy chain myosin and calponin, specific to a contractile SMC phenotype, are upregulated on collagen immobilized surfaces. These results suggest that nanotopography affects cell adhesion, proliferation, as well as cell elongation, while collagen immobilized surfaces greatly affect cell differentiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Materials)

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