Special Issue "Smart Health 2016"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 June 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Falcone Lanas

Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Universidad Publica de Navarra, UPNA, Spain
Website1 | Website2 | E-Mail
Interests: wireless networks; performance evaluation; distributed systems; context aware environments; IoT; next generation wireless systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the main challenges in the provision of Health Care services is to achieve sustainability in a scenario in which the population is ageing. Traditional health systems are strongly based on physical presence of a medical specialist with patients, which increases overall costs, as well as a reduction in the quality of life of patients, especially in the case of an elderly population, the disabled, or chronic diseases. In this context, the inclusion of Information and Communication Technologies can provide a means to reduce overall health service provision costs, as well as increasing quality of living levels, by enabling users to be remotely monitored in the comfort of their homes. This has given rise to multiple solutions based on e-Health and m-Health solutions, which can also be coupled to different types of wearable technologies in order to provide context-aware scenarios, also known as Ambient Assisted Living. These multiple systems can interact with higher-level management systems within a city or region, which can be in the framework of a Smart City context, leading to the paradigm of Smart Health.

This Special Issue is focused on solutions, case studies and test beds in order to enable Smart Health environments, from the point of view of Health specialists, IT professionals, Social Services, and End Users.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Falcone
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Smart Health
  • Ambient Assisted Living
  • Building Automation Systems
  • e-Health/m-Health
  • Wearable Devices
  • Wireless Sensor Networks
  • HetNet
  • User Centric Communications/Human Computer Interfaces

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Motivation and User Engagement in Fitness Tracking: Heuristics for Mobile Healthcare Wearables
Informatics 2017, 4(1), 5; doi:10.3390/informatics4010005
Received: 11 October 2016 / Revised: 11 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 22 January 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wearable fitness trackers have gained a new level of popularity due to their ambient data gathering and analysis. This has signalled a trend toward self-efficacy and increased motivation among users of these devices. For consumers looking to improve their health, fitness trackers offer
[...] Read more.
Wearable fitness trackers have gained a new level of popularity due to their ambient data gathering and analysis. This has signalled a trend toward self-efficacy and increased motivation among users of these devices. For consumers looking to improve their health, fitness trackers offer a way to more readily gain motivation via the personal data-based insights the devices offer. However, the user experience (UX) that accompanies wearables is critical to helping users interpret, understand, gain motivation and act on their data. Despite this, there is little evidence as to specific aspects of fitness tracker user engagement and long-term motivation. We report on a 4-week situated diary study and Healthcare Technology Self-efficacy (HTSE) questionnaire assessment of 34 users of two popular American fitness trackers: JawBone and FitBit. The study results illustrate design implications and requirements for fitness trackers and other self-efficacy mobile healthcare applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Health 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Preferences of Informal Carers on Technology Packages to Support Meal Production by People Living with Dementia, Elicited from Personalised AT and ICT Product Brochures
Informatics 2017, 4(1), 1; doi:10.3390/informatics4010001
Received: 15 July 2016 / Revised: 20 December 2016 / Accepted: 22 December 2016 / Published: 5 January 2017
PDF Full-text (365 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Assistive technology (AT) can help support the continued independence of people living with dementia, supported by informal carers. Opinions and preferences of informal carers towards a range of assistive and digital information and communication technologies (ICT) to support food purchase and menu selection,
[...] Read more.
Assistive technology (AT) can help support the continued independence of people living with dementia, supported by informal carers. Opinions and preferences of informal carers towards a range of assistive and digital information and communication technologies (ICT) to support food purchase and menu selection, including navigation and online shopping, and safe meal-making by individuals living with dementia were investigated. General attitudes and experiences with assistive technologies were first probed by means of a focus group with carers (n = 6), organised through the Alzheimer’s Society in Nottingham, England. A series of AT/ICT product brochures were then produced, describing packages of technologies to enable meal production. Task-specific questions were asked of carers (n = 10) at local Memory Cafés as to the perceived capabilities of each individual for shopping and meal-making. Carers were asked to make pair-wise choices in order to select a personalised brochure and to complete a questionnaire to elicit the practicality, desirability and affordability of specific products and to probe for preferences amongst key features. Opinions on ease-of-use, aesthetics, expected safety-in-use, independence of use and stigma related to the technology packages were also collected. Results showed that carers are able to make detailed choices and express preferences about assistive and digital technologies for the individuals in their care, and customise their enabler package. Most believed that having an enabler package would improve safety. Greater exposure of carers to newer digital products would be beneficial. The brochure method could be employed on consumer websites and by AT assessors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Health 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Older People Using e-Health Services—Exploring Frequency of Use and Associations with Perceived Benefits for Spouse Caregivers
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 15; doi:10.3390/informatics3030015
Received: 26 June 2016 / Revised: 24 August 2016 / Accepted: 25 August 2016 / Published: 1 September 2016
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Abstract
ICT, information- and communication technologies, and e-health services are essential for meeting future care demands. Greater knowledge regarding the implementation of e-health services in long-term care for older people is needed. The purpose of the study was to explore older people’s use of
[...] Read more.
ICT, information- and communication technologies, and e-health services are essential for meeting future care demands. Greater knowledge regarding the implementation of e-health services in long-term care for older people is needed. The purpose of the study was to explore older people’s use of e-health services and associations between frequency of use and perceived benefits. In the longitudinal comparative intervention study (n = 65), intervention group participants (n = 42) used an e-health service for 1.5 years. A control group (n = 23) used similar services provided in a traditional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires and analyzed using linear and logistic regressions. Although general use of the Internet was similar in both groups, the e-health group perceived significantly higher benefits. The component information- and education programs, developed specifically for the e-health service, had the highest association with benefits. Conclusion: e-health services targeted at supporting older people who care for a spouse at home can provide benefits which most likely will not be obtained without participation in an organized e-service. Care professionals play an essential role in encouraging spouse caregivers to become e-service users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Health 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Advancing the Direction of Health Information Management in Greek Public Hospitals: Theoretical Directions and Methodological Implications for Sharing Information in order to Obtain Decision-Making
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 14; doi:10.3390/informatics3030014
Received: 16 June 2016 / Revised: 29 July 2016 / Accepted: 9 August 2016 / Published: 15 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (185 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although consultants have long placed the use of research information at the centre of their activity, the extent that physicians use this information tends to vary widely. Despite this study and its recommendations, there is still a gap between the functions of a
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Although consultants have long placed the use of research information at the centre of their activity, the extent that physicians use this information tends to vary widely. Despite this study and its recommendations, there is still a gap between the functions of a manager and the use of the associated information, while the decision-making procedures vary according to the organization in which they work. The cost of IT remains the largest barrier, while some current IT solutions are not user friendly and out-of-date, particularly for public hospitals in Greece. The knowledge management is concerned not only with the facts and figures of production, but also with the know-how of staff. The information needs protocol should not be referred only to those who comply with formal computer-based information systems, but also to those who take into account other informal information and its flow within the organization. In a field such as medicine, where out-of-date information may be positively dangerous, doctors make heavy use of journals and several texts from the web. The decision-making process is a complex approach, particularly in human diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Therefore, it is very important to set priorities in the sector of health information management and promote education and training on information and communication technology (ICT). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Health 2016)
Open AccessArticle Choosing a Model for eConsult Specialist Remuneration: Factors to Consider
Informatics 2016, 3(2), 8; doi:10.3390/informatics3020008
Received: 8 April 2016 / Revised: 10 June 2016 / Accepted: 13 June 2016 / Published: 18 June 2016
PDF Full-text (462 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electronic consultation (eConsult) is an innovative solution that allows specialists and primary care providers to communicate electronically, improving access to specialist care. Understanding the cost implications of different remuneration models available to pay specialists is of critical importance as adoption of these services
[...] Read more.
Electronic consultation (eConsult) is an innovative solution that allows specialists and primary care providers to communicate electronically, improving access to specialist care. Understanding the cost implications of different remuneration models available to pay specialists is of critical importance as adoption of these services continues to increase. We used data collected through the Champlain BASE (Building Access to Specialists through eConsultation) eConsult service to simulate the cost implications of different remuneration models in Canada. The prorated hourly rate model averaged $45.72 CAD (Canadian Dollar) per eConsult while the prorated hourly rate with incentive averaged $51.90 CAD per eConsult, and the fee for service cost $60.50 CAD per eConsult. Paying all specialty groups to block three hours per week for eConsults averaged $337.44 CAD per eConsult and paying for 1-h blocks averaged $133.41 CAD per eConsult. As the remuneration of specialists is the largest cost driver of an established eConsult service, our findings can inform policymakers considering the implementation of eConsult or wishing to further develop an existing service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Health 2016)
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