Special Issue "Human–Information Interaction"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Paul Parsons

Department of Computer Graphics Technology, Purdue University, 401 N Grant St, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human-computer interaction; human-centered design; information visualization; visual interface design; interaction design; educational and learning technologies; applied cognition and perception
Guest Editor
Dr. Kamran Sedig

Department of Computer Science and The Faculty of Information & Media Studies, Western University, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7, Canada
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of the Informatics journal welcomes submissions on the topic of human-information interaction (HII). HII is concerned with how and why humans use, find, consume, work with, and interact with information to solve problems, make decisions, learn, plan, make sense, discover, and carry out numerous other tasks and activities. Although tools and technologies mediate interaction with information, the focus of HII research is not on technological issues per se. HII focuses on the interaction between humans and information that is mediated and supported by interactive technologies in the areas of decision support, health and medicine, education, libraries, personal-information management, natural and social science, and others. HII is inherently interdisciplinary, and draws from research in human-computer interaction, information science, cognitive and perceptual sciences, health and medical informatics, information visualization, educational technologies, library science, and information systems. We encourage authors to submit their original research articles, work in progress, surveys, reviews, and viewpoint articles in this field. This special issue welcomes applications, theories, models, and frameworks—whether conceptual, analytical, prescriptive, predictive, design-related, or otherwise—that are concerned with (but not limited to) the following topics as they relate to HII:

  • Interaction Design
  • Distributed Cognition
  • Thinking and Reasoning
  • Visual Reasoning
  • Interactive Cognition
  • Interaction Patterns
  • Sensemaking
  • Complex Cognition
  • Cognitive Activities
  • Information Behavior
  • Knowledge Work
  • Learning
  • Problem Solving
  • Decision Making
  • Planning
  • Mental Models and Representations
  • Embodied Cognition
  • Information Foraging
  • Information Triage
  • Interface Design
  • Information Design
  • Information Spaces
  • Visual Representations
  • Information-Intensive Tasks
  • Perception
  • Design Thinking
  • Document Collections
  • Data and Information Visualization

Dr. Kamran Sedig
Dr. Paul Parsons
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Human–Information Interaction—A Special Issue of the Journal of Informatics
Informatics 2015, 2(1), 1-3; doi:10.3390/informatics2010001
Received: 24 March 2015 / Revised: 24 March 2015 / Accepted: 24 March 2015 / Published: 24 March 2015
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Abstract
Every day, people from different professions and disciplines need to use information to make decisions, plan courses of action, discover patterns in big data, solve problems, analyze situations, make sense of phenomena, learn new concepts, make forecasts about future trends, and so on.
[...] Read more.
Every day, people from different professions and disciplines need to use information to make decisions, plan courses of action, discover patterns in big data, solve problems, analyze situations, make sense of phenomena, learn new concepts, make forecasts about future trends, and so on. People whose professions involve the frequent or continual performance of such activities include scientists, healthcare specialists, medical researchers, librarians, journalists, engineers, stock brokers, archeologists, educators, social scientists, and others—i.e., the so-called knowledge workers. As the amount and complexity of information is on the rise, it is becoming more important to understand how humans use and interact with information to support their everyday tasks and activities. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Information Interaction)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Opening up the Black Box of Sensor Processing Algorithms through New Visualizations
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 16; doi:10.3390/informatics3030016
Received: 7 May 2016 / Revised: 5 September 2016 / Accepted: 18 September 2016 / Published: 21 September 2016
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Abstract
Vehicles and platforms with multiple sensors connect people in multiple roles with different responsibilities to scenes of interest. For many of these human–sensor systems there are a variety of algorithms that transform, select, and filter the sensor data prior to human intervention. Emergency
[...] Read more.
Vehicles and platforms with multiple sensors connect people in multiple roles with different responsibilities to scenes of interest. For many of these human–sensor systems there are a variety of algorithms that transform, select, and filter the sensor data prior to human intervention. Emergency response, precision agriculture, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) are examples of these human–computation–sensor systems. The authors examined a case of the latter to understand how people in various roles utilize the algorithms output to identify meaningful properties in data streams given uncertainty. The investigations revealed: (a) that increasingly complex interactions occur across agents in the human–computation–sensor system; and (b) analysts struggling to interpret the output of “black box” algorithms given uncertainty and change in the scenes of interest. The paper presents a new interactive visualization concept designed to “open up the black box” of sensor processing algorithms to support human analysts as they look for meaning in feeds from sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Information Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle Designing a Situational Awareness Information Display: Adopting an Affordance-Based Framework to Amplify User Experience in Environmental Interaction Design
Informatics 2016, 3(2), 6; doi:10.3390/informatics3020006
Received: 1 December 2015 / Revised: 21 April 2016 / Accepted: 2 June 2016 / Published: 9 June 2016
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Abstract
User experience remains a crucial consideration when assessing the successfulness of information visualization systems. The theory of affordances provides a robust framework for user experience design. In this article, we demonstrate a design case that employs an affordance-based framework and evaluate the information
[...] Read more.
User experience remains a crucial consideration when assessing the successfulness of information visualization systems. The theory of affordances provides a robust framework for user experience design. In this article, we demonstrate a design case that employs an affordance-based framework and evaluate the information visualization display design. SolarWheels is an interactive information visualization designed for large display walls in computer network control rooms to help cybersecurity analysts become aware of network status and emerging issues. Given the critical nature of this context, the status and performance of a computer network must be precisely monitored and remedied in real time. In this study, we consider various aspects of affordances in order to amplify the user experience via visualization and interaction design. SolarWheels visualizes the multilayer multidimensional computer network issues with a series of integrated circular visualizations inspired by the metaphor of the solar system. To amplify user interaction and experience, the system provides a three-zone physical interaction that allows multiple users to interact with the system. Users can read details at different levels depending on their distance from the display. An expert evaluation study, based on a four-layer affordance framework, was conducted to assess and improve the interactive visualization design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Information Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle Developing a Model of Distributed Sensemaking: A Case Study of Military Analysis
Informatics 2016, 3(1), 1; doi:10.3390/informatics3010001
Received: 15 December 2015 / Revised: 13 February 2016 / Accepted: 16 February 2016 / Published: 26 February 2016
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Abstract
In this paper, we examine the role of representational artefacts in sensemaking. Embodied within representational media, such as maps, charts and lists, are a number of affordances, which can furnish sensemakers with the ability to perform tasks that may be difficult to do
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we examine the role of representational artefacts in sensemaking. Embodied within representational media, such as maps, charts and lists, are a number of affordances, which can furnish sensemakers with the ability to perform tasks that may be difficult to do inside the head. Presented here is a study of sensemaking in action. We conducted a study of military intelligence analysts carrying out a training exercise, the analysis of which focuses on the use of external task-specific representations. We present a discussion of the findings of our study in the form of a model of distributed sensemaking. Our model concentrates on the interaction of information and various representational artefacts, leading to the generation of insights and a situation picture. We also introduce a number of levels of description for examining the properties and affordances offered by representational artefacts and their role in the sensemaking process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Information Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle Human–Information Interaction with Complex Information for Decision-Making
Informatics 2015, 2(2), 4-19; doi:10.3390/informatics2020004
Received: 25 April 2015 / Revised: 3 June 2015 / Accepted: 18 June 2015 / Published: 23 June 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (512 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Human–information interaction (HII) for simple information and for complex information is different because people’s goals and information needs differ between the two cases. With complex information, comprehension comes from understanding the relationships and interactions within the information and factors outside of a design
[...] Read more.
Human–information interaction (HII) for simple information and for complex information is different because people’s goals and information needs differ between the two cases. With complex information, comprehension comes from understanding the relationships and interactions within the information and factors outside of a design team’s control. Yet, a design team must consider all these within an HII design in order to maximize the communication potential. This paper considers how simple and complex information requires different design strategies and how those strategies differ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Information Interaction)
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