Special Issue "Social Computing for Knowledge Management"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Remo Pareschi

Associate Professor of Computer Science Program, Department of Bioscience and Territory, University of Molise, Contrada di Fonte Lappone, 86090 Pesche (IS), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Social Computing, Knowledge Management, Collective Intelligence, Content Analysis, Natural Language Man–Machine Interfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Knowledge Management (KM) was introduced in the 1990s, in consequence of the recognition that the value of enterprises is determined by the knowledge they produce and transform, at least as much as by the material goods and the financial assets that they possess. Therefore, organizational knowledge, to be maximized, best exploited, maintained, and increased over time, must be appropriately managed. Foremost among the concepts that emerged at this stage were the dual ones of "tacit knowledge" and of "explicit knowledge" and the knowledge life-cycle, which concerns the transformation of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge and vice versa, and thus highlights the dynamism and the fluidity of knowledge compared to the static nature of traditional corporate assets. However, even if aimed at capturing organizational fluidity at the very time of its inception, KM was superimposed with the information technology characteristic of the 1990s, strongly oriented towards hierarchical control and rigidly structured processes. This created an inherent contradiction and partially hindered the effectiveness of KM methodologies. We are now midway of the second decade of the new century, and, in the meantime, many things have happened in the direction of Social Computing. In particular there has been the first wave of the Web, and then Web 2.0, the blogosphere and, most of all, social networks. These new ways of social interaction through computer systems are transferable from the general context of the Internet to corporate intranets, where they provide support to KM through an IT finally appropriate to the fluid and social nature of organizational knowledge. This Special Issue seeks submissions offering research results and case studies that advance the state of the art of the methodologies aimed at the application of Social Computing to the support of Knowledge Management and that are concerned with (but not limited to) the following topics:

Prof. Dr. Remo Pareschi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corporate social media
  • corporate wikis
  • corporate storytelling
  • enterprise crowdsourcing
  • enterprise ecosystems
  • enterprise social networks
  • knowledge life-cycle
  • knowledge management
  • organizational social network analysis
  • sentiment analysis
  • social capital
  • social computing
  • social software
  • topic analysis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle When Wiki Technology Meets Corporate Knowledge Management Routines: A Sociomateriality Perspective
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 12; doi:10.3390/informatics3030012
Received: 19 May 2016 / Revised: 17 July 2016 / Accepted: 26 July 2016 / Published: 28 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (212 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There seems to be an inherent tension between wiki affordances—open boundaries, unconstrained editing, and transparency—and traditional knowledge management (KM) routines used in firms. The objective of this study is to investigate how users respond to these tensions during adoption of wiki technology at
[...] Read more.
There seems to be an inherent tension between wiki affordances—open boundaries, unconstrained editing, and transparency—and traditional knowledge management (KM) routines used in firms. The objective of this study is to investigate how users respond to these tensions during adoption of wiki technology at the workplace. The theoretical lens of sociomateriality highlights the manner in which routines and materiality (namely, technology) relate to one another, providing a useful conceptualization for our investigation. In particular, we adopt Leonardi’s theory of human and material imbrication, which stresses the importance of a worker’s past experiences with technology in determining his future adoption decisions. Extending Leonardi’s conceptualization, we suggest that out-of-work experiences are also influential. Namely, we argue that attitudes towards Wikipedia influence one’s response to wiki deployment in the workplace. Using an online survey containing four open-ended questions, we assessed the perceptions of employees towards wiki deployment. Results from our qualitative analysis of 1032 responses reveal five approaches users take in responding to the tensions between wiki affordances and existing KM routines, highlighting the effect of users’ dispositions towards Wikipedia. Our findings inform the sociomateriality literature and shed light on the challenges faced by organizations trying to adopt social media tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Computing for Knowledge Management)
Open AccessArticle Social Media Systems in the Workplace: Toward Understanding Employee Knowledge Creation via Microblogging within Shared Knowledge Domains
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 11; doi:10.3390/informatics3030011
Received: 22 April 2016 / Revised: 5 July 2016 / Accepted: 15 July 2016 / Published: 18 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (516 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adoption of social media systems (SMS), proprietary microblogging platforms in particular, for the purposes of information sharing has been increasingly on the rise among corporations. While Twitter is the preferred microblogging tool by the general public, there is scant research to address its
[...] Read more.
Adoption of social media systems (SMS), proprietary microblogging platforms in particular, for the purposes of information sharing has been increasingly on the rise among corporations. While Twitter is the preferred microblogging tool by the general public, there is scant research to address its viability as a conduit to facilitate knowledge creation among corporate users. As a result, this conceptual paper explores seven crucial Twitter features and derives to seven propositions that demonstrate how microblogging can enable knowledge creation among employees within shared knowledge domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Computing for Knowledge Management)
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Open AccessArticle Tagging Users’ Social Circles via Multiple Linear Regression
Informatics 2016, 3(3), 10; doi:10.3390/informatics3030010
Received: 4 March 2016 / Revised: 12 April 2016 / Accepted: 24 May 2016 / Published: 24 June 2016
PDF Full-text (787 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A social circle is a category of strong social relationships, such as families, classmates and good friends and so on. The information diffusion among members of online social circles is frequent and credible. The research of users’ online social circles has become popular
[...] Read more.
A social circle is a category of strong social relationships, such as families, classmates and good friends and so on. The information diffusion among members of online social circles is frequent and credible. The research of users’ online social circles has become popular in recent years. Many scholars propose methods for detecting users’ online social circles. On the other hand, the social meanings and the tags of a social circle are also important for the analysis of a social circle. However, little work involves the tags discovery of social circles. This paper proposes an algorithm for social circle tag detection by multiple linear regression. The model solves the data sparse problem of tags in social circles and successfully combines different categories of features in social circles. We also redmap the concept of the social circle into "reference circles" of an academic paper. We evaluate our method in datasets of both Facebook and Microsoft Academic Search, and prove that it is more effective than other relevant methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Computing for Knowledge Management)
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Open AccessConcept Paper How Thumbelina Knows
Informatics 2016, 3(4), 22; doi:10.3390/informatics3040022
Received: 3 August 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 16 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (262 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, I take the book by Michel Serres, “Thumbelina”, as an occasion for reflection on the conceptual basis of knowledge management, as was built by Nonaka and co-workers. The direct access to knowledge that Thumbelina practices together with her peers is,
[...] Read more.
In this paper, I take the book by Michel Serres, “Thumbelina”, as an occasion for reflection on the conceptual basis of knowledge management, as was built by Nonaka and co-workers. The direct access to knowledge that Thumbelina practices together with her peers is, in fact, for me, and is a good observation point to bring Nonaka’s reflection further towards the discovery of a new understanding of knowledge and knowing processes. If the digital revolution is the third step, after writing and printing, regarding the soft changes in the relations between human beings and knowledge, then it highlights the urgent problem of deepening our understanding of what knowledge and intelligence are, changing our practices at the educational level, and designing new digital tools to support our knowledge management processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Computing for Knowledge Management)
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