Special Issue "Economics of the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paul A. Scuffham
Centre for Applied Health Economics, School of Medicine & Population and Social Health Research Program Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Logan Campus, Meadowbrook, Queensland 4131, Australia
Website: http://www.griffith.edu.au/health/population-social-health-research-program/research
E-Mail: p.scuffham@griffith.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3382 1367
Fax: +61 7 3382 1338
Interests: economic evaluation of healthcare interventions; cost of illness; cost-effectiveness analysis; valuation of health states; use of multi-attribute utility instruments; medical devices; health services research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity is the fastest growing cause for morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Obesity is a risk factor for chronic diseases, loss of quality of life, incapacity and eventually death. One of the potential consequences of obesity is diabetes mellitus. This in itself requires management with therapeutic agents, and often a change in lifestyle and diet. However, the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to grow and cost the health system more and more due to its consequences and complications which include blindness, neuropathy, foot and leg ulcers and often amputations.

Lifestyle factors are the main cause of obesity and thus obesity (and many of its consequences) is preventable. However, for an individual, the more obese they become, the more difficult it is to reverse that trend. There are now several pharmaceutical and surgical interventions available to manage or reverse obesity, but lifestyle factors are the most difficult to change.

There are a multitude of potential interventions and policy responses to prevent and treat obesity. Some focus on reducing consumption of unhealthy foods by imposing differential taxes on healthy vs junk foods, restrictions on advertising and increased physical activity in school curricula. Other interventions target those who are obese with multidisciplinary teams that include a psychologist, exercise physiologist and nutritionist/dietician to assist in changing lifestyle, pharmaceuticals to reduce intestinal absorption of fats or to increase metabolic rates, and the range of bariatric surgeries including gastric bypass, lap banding and now gastric sleeves. However, in order to use available resources wisely and to be able to prioritise between potential interventions, detailed information is needed on both health outcomes and costs, and the relation between the two. Moreover, the optimal balance of resources allocated to prevention versus treatment of obesity is highly debatable.

The focus of this Special Issue is on the Economics of Prevention and Treatment of Obesity. This includes developing knowledge on the economic consequences of prevention and treatments, on both the cost and the benefit side, in order to reduce societal as well as individual burden caused by obesity.

Empirical, theoretical and review papers are equally welcome, on any topic relevant to Economics of Prevention and Treatment of Obesity. Submissions on the optimal balance of resources allocated to prevention and treatment, articles identifying the optimal patient criteria for surgical interventions, and articles describing public acceptability of policy are especially welcome.

Professor Paul A. Scuffham
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • costs
  • public health
  • prevention
  • treatment
  • chronic disease
  • obesity
  • bariatric surgery
  • intervention
  • resource allocation
  • economic evaluation

Published Papers (5 papers)

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(4), 4007-4025; doi:10.3390/ijerph110404007
Received: 1 February 2014; in revised form: 28 March 2014 / Accepted: 28 March 2014 / Published: 14 April 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (253 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(3), 3387-3406; doi:10.3390/ijerph110303387
Received: 23 December 2013; in revised form: 10 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 March 2014 / Published: 21 March 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (264 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(3), 2456-2471; doi:10.3390/ijerph110302456
Received: 31 December 2013; in revised form: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 27 February 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (228 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 573-582; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100573
Received: 10 September 2013; in revised form: 2 December 2013 / Accepted: 13 December 2013 / Published: 31 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (441 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text |  Supplementary Files

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 418-428; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100418
Received: 12 November 2013; in revised form: 19 December 2013 / Accepted: 19 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (457 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text

Last update: 26 April 2013

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert