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Special Issue "Diabetes Prevention: Challenges and Opportunities"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hermes J. Florez (Website)

Division of Epidemiology & Population Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1201 NW 16th Street, CLC 207, Miami VA Healthcare System - GRECC, Miami, FL 33125, USA
Interests: prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease; evidence-based programs for healthy aging; osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in elderly and minority populations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the US, 79 million people have prediabetes while worldwide approximately 280 million are affected. The number of individuals with prediabetes may approach 400 million by 2030, contributing to the global burden of the diabetes. In response to this epidemic, several primary prevention trials, such as the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and studies in Finland, China, and India have shown the benefits of lifestyle intervention to reduce diabetes risk. DPP demonstrated that modest weight loss, through diet and exercise, leads to a 58% risk reduction over 3 years (4 years delay over a decade in the onset of diabetes). However few individuals with prediabetes have achieved and sustained the weight loss goal proposed by the DPP. Most hospitals and other settings caring for those at high-risk for diabetes are not prepared to deliver DPP-like interventions. This special issue has a broad focus on prevention of diabetes, with the ultimate goal to continue building the scientific knowledge needed to reduce diabetes burden on high-risk individuals (overweight and obese patients, minority populations, the elderly, and women with history of gestational diabetes).  Both empirical and review papers on any topic relevant to diabetes prevention would be welcome. Papers on implementation (translation) of prevention strategies are especially encouraged.

Dr. Hermes J. Florez
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • implementation of diabetes prevention strategies in healthcare systems
  • school systems
  • community-based interventions
  • older adults
  • gestational diabetes
  • minority populations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Diabetes Prevention in the New York City Sikh Asian Indian Community: A Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 5462-5486; doi:10.3390/ijerph110505462
Received: 31 January 2014 / Revised: 6 May 2014 / Accepted: 9 May 2014 / Published: 19 May 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (267 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
India has one of the highest burdens of diabetes worldwide, and rates of diabetes are also high among Asian Indian immigrants that have migrated into the United States (U.S.). Sikhs represent a significant portion of Asian Indians in the U.S. Diabetes prevention [...] Read more.
India has one of the highest burdens of diabetes worldwide, and rates of diabetes are also high among Asian Indian immigrants that have migrated into the United States (U.S.). Sikhs represent a significant portion of Asian Indians in the U.S. Diabetes prevention programs have shown the benefits of using lifestyle intervention to reduce diabetes risk, yet there have been no culturally-tailored programs for diabetes prevention in the Sikh community. Using a quasi-experimental two-arm design, 126 Sikh Asian Indians living in New York City were enrolled in a six-workshop intervention led by community health workers. A total of 108 participants completed baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys between March 2012 and October 2013. Main outcome measures included clinical variables (weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol) and health behaviors (changes in physical activity, food behaviors, and diabetes knowledge). Changes were significant for the treatment group in weight, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, physical activity, food behaviors, and diabetes knowledge, and between group differences were significant for glucose, diabetes knowledge, portion control, and physical activity social interaction. Retention rates were high. Findings demonstrate that a diabetes prevention program in the Sikh community is acceptable, feasible, and efficacious. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes Prevention: Challenges and Opportunities)
Open AccessArticle Health Utilities of Type 2 Diabetes-Related Complications: A Cross-Sectional Study in Sweden
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 4939-4952; doi:10.3390/ijerph110504939
Received: 24 February 2014 / Revised: 1 April 2014 / Accepted: 4 May 2014 / Published: 7 May 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study estimates health utilities (HU) in Sweden for a range of type 2 diabetes-related complications using EQ-5D and two alternative tariffs (UK and Swedish) from 1757 patients with type 2 diabetes from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR). Ordinary least squares [...] Read more.
This study estimates health utilities (HU) in Sweden for a range of type 2 diabetes-related complications using EQ-5D and two alternative tariffs (UK and Swedish) from 1757 patients with type 2 diabetes from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR). Ordinary least squares were used for statistical analysis. Lower HU was found for female gender, younger age at diagnosis, higher BMI, and history of complications. Microvascular and macrovascular complications had the most negative effect on HU among women and men, respectively. The greatest decline in HU was associated with kidney disorders (−0.114) using the UK tariff and stroke (−0.059) using the Swedish tariff. Multiple stroke and non-acute ischaemic heart disease had higher negative effect than a single event. With the UK tariff, each year elapsed since the last microvascular/macrovascular complication was associated with 0.013 and 0.007 units higher HU, respectively. We found important heterogeneities in effects of complications on HU in terms of gender, multiple event, and time. The Swedish tariff gave smaller estimates and so may result in less cost-effective interventions than the UK tariff. These results suggest that incorporating subgroup-specific HU in cost-utility analyses might provide more insight for informed decision-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes Prevention: Challenges and Opportunities)
Open AccessArticle Beginning A Patient-Centered Approach in the Design of A Diabetes Prevention Program
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(2), 2003-2013; doi:10.3390/ijerph110202003
Received: 18 December 2013 / Revised: 24 January 2014 / Accepted: 24 January 2014 / Published: 14 February 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (113 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify patient preferences for different components of a local diabetes prevention program that would improve reach. A secondary purpose was to determine if patient characteristics were related to program preferences. Methods: Participants were identified [...] Read more.
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify patient preferences for different components of a local diabetes prevention program that would improve reach. A secondary purpose was to determine if patient characteristics were related to program preferences. Methods: Participants were identified through electronic medical records from two family medicine clinics in Virginia. Participants completed a mailed survey addressing demographics, economic status, risk factors for diabetes, and preferences regarding diabetes prevention interventions—delivery mode, program length, and duration. Results: Twenty-nine percent of eligible participants responded (n = 142); 83% of participants were at risk for diabetes and 82% had a household income <$20,000. When presented with the choice between a class-based vs. a technology-based program, 83% preferred a technology-based program. Whites were less likely to choose the technology-based program, with no significant differences based on age, education, income, or gender. Conclusions: Contrary to beliefs that lower income individuals may not use technology-based interventions, lower socioeconomic patients indicated a preference for a technology- and telephone-supported diabetes prevention program over in-person class approaches. Findings provide formative data to support the design of a patient-centered, technology-enhanced diabetes prevention program in a real-world setting, thereby increasing potential participation and reach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes Prevention: Challenges and Opportunities)

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