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Special Issue "Biological and Agricultural Engineering"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Yuanhui Zhang (Website)

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W Pennsylvania Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
Fax: +1 217 244 0323

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agricultural operations, including animal feeding operations, result in concerns of indoor air quality and emissions such as odors, ammonia, dusts, and microbiological agents into the outdoor environment, which can have adverse effects on the environment, animal and human health, and quality of rural living.  Public concerns about the environmental and health effects have grown with the increasing size and geographic concentration of these operations, and rapid growing populations in rural communities. Methods and procedures for measuring, monitoring, analyzing, evaluating and controlling aerial pollution from various agricultural operations need more extensive research and be standardized to obtain comprehensive information about the pollutants and their effects as scientific basis of related public policies and mitigation actions.  This special edition is to highlight the recent research progresses in characterizing and controlling airborne pollutions from agricultural operations. Research papers on following topics are particularly welcome: (1) Scientific basis for estimating the production and emission to the atmosphere of various specified substances from agricultural operations; (2) Practical and reliable methods for measuring and estimating pollution generations and emissions from agricultural operations; and (3) Novel technologies and modified agricultural practices for mitigating emissions.

Dr. Yuanhui Zhang
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • agricultural operations
  • confined animal feeding operations

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Simultaneous Isolation of Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase from Bovine Colostrum by SPEC 70 SLS Cation Exchange Resin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(9), 3764-3776; doi:10.3390/ijerph8093764
Received: 19 July 2011 / Revised: 19 August 2011 / Accepted: 31 August 2011 / Published: 21 September 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin (Lf) and lactoperoxidase (Lp) from defatted bovine colostrum by one-step cation exchange chromatography with SPEC 70 SLS ion-exchange resin was investigated. A RP-HPLC method for Lf and Lp determination was developed and optimized as the [...] Read more.
In this work, simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin (Lf) and lactoperoxidase (Lp) from defatted bovine colostrum by one-step cation exchange chromatography with SPEC 70 SLS ion-exchange resin was investigated. A RP-HPLC method for Lf and Lp determination was developed and optimized as the following conditions: detection wavelength of 220 nm, flow rate of 1 mL/min and acetonitrile concentration from 25% to 75% within 20 min. The adsorption process of Lf on SPEC 70 SLS resin was optimized using Lf standard as substrate. The maximum static binding capacity of SPEC 70 SLS resin was of 22.0 mg/g resin at 15 °С, pH 7.0 and adsorption time 3 h. The Lf adsorption process could be well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 21.73 mg/g resin at 15 °С. In batch fractionation of defatted colostrum, the binding capacities of SPEC 70 SLS resin for adsorbing Lf and Lp simultaneously under the abovementioned conditions were 7.60 and 6.89 mg/g resin, respectively, both of which were superior to those of CM Sepharose F.F. or SP Sepharose F.F. resins under the same conditions. As a result, SPEC 70 SLS resin was considered as a successful candidate for direct and economic purification of Lf and Lp from defatted colostrum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Agricultural Engineering)
Open AccessArticle The Correlation between Thermal and Noxious Gas Environments, Pig Productivity and Behavioral Responses of Growing Pigs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(9), 3514-3527; doi:10.3390/ijerph8093514
Received: 22 July 2011 / Accepted: 9 August 2011 / Published: 25 August 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Correlations between environmental parameters (thermal range and noxious gas levels) and the status (productivity, physiological, and behavioral) of growing pigs were examined for the benefit of pig welfare and precision farming. The livestock experiment was conducted at a Seoul National University station [...] Read more.
Correlations between environmental parameters (thermal range and noxious gas levels) and the status (productivity, physiological, and behavioral) of growing pigs were examined for the benefit of pig welfare and precision farming. The livestock experiment was conducted at a Seoul National University station in South Korea. Many variations were applied and the physiological and behavioral responses of the growing pigs were closely observed. Thermal and gas environment parameters were different during the summer and winter seasons, and the environments in the treatments were controlled in different manners. In the end, this study finds that factors such as Average Daily Gain (ADG), Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH), stress, posture, and eating habits were all affected by the controlled environmental parameters and that appropriate control of the foregoing could contribute to the improvement of precision farming and pig welfare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Agricultural Engineering)
Open AccessArticle Chemical Analysis of Nutritional Content of Prickly Pads (Opuntia ficus indica) at Varied Ages in an Organic Harvest
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(5), 1287-1295; doi:10.3390/ijerph8051287
Received: 18 January 2011 / Revised: 8 April 2011 / Accepted: 19 April 2011 / Published: 26 April 2011
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (125 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Opuntia ficus indica, also known as prickly pads, are an important part of the human diet and are also used as forage for livestock. This is an interesting vegetable due the environmental conditions in which it grows and its resistance to [...] Read more.
Opuntia ficus indica, also known as prickly pads, are an important part of the human diet and are also used as forage for livestock. This is an interesting vegetable due the environmental conditions in which it grows and its resistance to climatic extremes; however, little is known about its nutritional properties, especially in the later stages of maturity. The objective of this study was to determine the composition of organic prickly pads (Opuntia ficus indica) at differing stages of growth maturity. Chemical proximate analysis and mineral constituent analysis at different maturation stages were carried out in this investigation. As a result, older prickly pads were found to be an important source of nutritional components such as calcium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

Review

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Open AccessReview Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(6), 1957-1976; doi:10.3390/ijerph8061957
Received: 17 March 2011 / Revised: 25 May 2011 / Accepted: 27 May 2011 / Published: 3 June 2011
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) [...] Read more.
Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

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