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Special Issue "Alcohol Abuse: Newer Approaches to an Old Problem"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. David J. Hanson

State University of New York College at Potsdam, Department of Sociology, 112 Breckenridge Place, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: impact of drinking beverage alcohol on health; effective ways to reduce alcohol abuse in a population

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The problems caused by the heavy consumption of alcohol continue throughout the world despite the enormous human and material resources being applied in our efforts to reduce both alcohol abuse and the negative health, medical, social, economic and other consequences that can result.

To the extent that we continue using theories and techniques that might not be as effective as some alternatives might be, we are being inefficient and less than optimally effective. The costs would not only be financial but also human.

Therefore, this special issue will focus on newer approaches to reducing (1) the incidence of harmful drinking and (2) the harms that can result from such consumption. In doing so, it seeks to be inclusive and invites papers that present newer ideas, theories, techniques, programs and models. It seeks not only empirical studies but also reviews and opinion pieces.

Prof. Dr. David J. Hanson
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • harm reduction
  • social norms marketing,
  • educational programs
  • treatment alternatives
  • public policies on alcohol

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Assessing Alcohol Dependence in Hospitalized Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(6), 5783-5791; doi:10.3390/ijerph110605783
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 6 April 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 28 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Alcohol misuse is generally not detected in hospital settings. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence in hospitalized patients in a university hospital in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Patients were randomly selected from all hospital admissions.
[...] Read more.
Alcohol misuse is generally not detected in hospital settings. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence in hospitalized patients in a university hospital in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Patients were randomly selected from all hospital admissions. The final sample consisted of 169 adult inpatients. Two screening tools were used: the Short Alcohol Dependence Data (SADD) and the CAGE questionnaires. In this sample, 25.4% of patients could be considered alcohol dependent according to the CAGE questionnaire, whereas 32.9% of patients fulfilled the criteria according to the SADD. The only predictor of alcohol dependence was gender; male inpatients were 3.2 times more prone to alcohol dependence with female inpatients. All inpatients should be systematically screened for alcohol use disorders. The choice of the screening tool will depend on whether the goal is to identify inpatients with hazardous drinking behaviors or with established alcohol-related problems. To maximize proper case identification, the CAGE questionnaire should be used as a first-step screening tool, and patients who screen positive on this scale should be subsequently administered the SADD questionnaire to assess the severity of the condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Abuse: Newer Approaches to an Old Problem)
Open AccessArticle Anthropometric and Health-Related Behavioral Factors in the Explanation of Social Inequalities in Low Birth Weight in Children with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 849-865; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100849
Received: 12 November 2013 / Revised: 18 December 2013 / Accepted: 25 December 2013 / Published: 8 January 2014
PDF Full-text (234 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is evidence for social inequalities in the health status of children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). This study aimed to describe social inequalities in low birth weight (LBW) in children/adolescents with PAE and to examine the contribution of anthropometric and health-related behavioral
[...] Read more.
There is evidence for social inequalities in the health status of children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). This study aimed to describe social inequalities in low birth weight (LBW) in children/adolescents with PAE and to examine the contribution of anthropometric and health-related behavioral factors to the explanation of social inequalities. A total of 2,159 participants with parental self-reported moderate to regular PAE (enrolled in the cross-sectional German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents) were examined. At similar levels of PAE, the risk of LBW was significantly increased in subjects with a low socioeconomic status (SES) (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.59, 4.86) and middle SES (adjusted OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.28, 3.24). Maternal height, maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking during pregnancy mediated the association. The mediating effect of maternal height was 12.5% to 33.7%. Maternal BMI explained 7.9% of the socioeconomic difference in LBW between the high and low SES groups in children with PAE. The mediating effect of smoking during pregnancy was 17.3% to 31.5%. Maternal height, maternal BMI and smoking during pregnancy together explained 24.4% to 60.1% of the socioeconomic differences in LBW in children with PAE. A large proportion of the socioeconomic differences in LBW in children with PAE can be attributed to anthropometric and health-related behavioral factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Abuse: Newer Approaches to an Old Problem)

Review

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Open AccessReview Alcohol and Violence in the Emergency Room: A Review and Perspectives from Psychological and Social Sciences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4584-4606; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104584
Received: 26 June 2013 / Revised: 16 September 2013 / Accepted: 17 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (218 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Our objective is to present a focused review of the scientific literature on the effect of alcohol consumption on violence related-injuries assessed in the emergency room (ER) and to show how psychological and behavioral sciences could lead to a better understanding of the
[...] Read more.
Our objective is to present a focused review of the scientific literature on the effect of alcohol consumption on violence related-injuries assessed in the emergency room (ER) and to show how psychological and behavioral sciences could lead to a better understanding of the factors contributing to alcohol-related injuries in the ER. We retrieved published literature through a detailed search in Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE with Full Text PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, PUBMed and SocINDEX with Full Text for articles related to emergency rooms, medical problems and sociocognitive models addressing alcohol intoxication articles. The first search was conducted in June 2011 and updated until August 2013. Literature shows that compared to uninjured patients; injured ones have a higher probability of: (i) having an elevated blood-alcohol concentration upon arrival at the ER; (ii) reporting having drunk alcohol during the six hours preceding the event; and (iii) suffering from drinking-related consequences that adversely affect their social life. The main neurocognitive and sociocognitive models on alcohol and aggression are also discussed in order to understand the aetiology of violence-related injuries in emergency rooms. Suggestions are made for future research and prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Abuse: Newer Approaches to an Old Problem)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessDiscussion Alcoholism Risk Reduction in France: A Modernised Approach Related to Alcohol Misuse Disorders
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11664-11675; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111664
Received: 11 July 2014 / Revised: 27 October 2014 / Accepted: 28 October 2014 / Published: 13 November 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (646 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During many years in France, risk reduction strategies for substance abuse concerned prevention strategies in the general population or interventions near users of illicit substances. In this spirit, the reduction of consumption only concerned opiate addicts. With regard to alcohol, the prevention messages
[...] Read more.
During many years in France, risk reduction strategies for substance abuse concerned prevention strategies in the general population or interventions near users of illicit substances. In this spirit, the reduction of consumption only concerned opiate addicts. With regard to alcohol, the prevention messages relative to controlled consumption were difficult to transmit because of the importance of this product in the culture of the country. In addition, methods of treatment of alcoholism rested on the dogma of abstinence. Several factors have recently led to an evolution in the treatment of alcohol use disorders integrating the reduction of consumption in strategies. Strategies for reducing consumption should aim for consumption below recommended thresholds (two drinks per day for women, three for the men) or, at least, in that direction. It must also be supported by pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, which offer possibilities. Failure to manage reduction will allow the goals to be revisited and to reconsider abstinence. Finally this evolution or revolution is a new paradigm carried in particular by a pragmatic approach of the disease and new treatments. The aims of this article are to give elements of comprehension relating to the evolution of the practices in France in prevention and treatment of alcohol use disorders and in particular with regard to the reduction of consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Abuse: Newer Approaches to an Old Problem)

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