Special Issue "Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Mr. André Koenig (Website)

Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technical University of Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt, Germany
Phone: +49-6151-16-6137
Interests: Security & Trust, Communication Services
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ralf Steinmetz (Website)

Head, Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technical University of Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt, Germany
Fax: +49-6151-16-6152
Interests: networked multimedia issues, seamless multimedia communications, network dependability and security, quality of service, content distribution networks, context aware communications, media semantics, mobility, Internet telephony, telemedia learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evolving communication paradigms such as mobile ad hoc, mesh, and sensor networks as well as peer-to-peer applications demand for novel security solutions. Due to the changed characteristics compared to today's networks, these systems are beyond the protection of (most of) today's security mechanisms. New approaches that are able to handle the challenging conditions have to be developed. In this process, the mutual influence of security and quality of service/experience has to be considered as an integral element. This way, coexistence of security and performance can be achieved in order to further catalyze the evolution.

Ralf Steinmetz
André König
Guest Editors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Applications and Security of Next-Generation, User-Centric Wireless Systems
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 190-211; doi:10.3390/fi2030190
Received: 6 March 2010 / Revised: 3 June 2010 / Accepted: 16 July 2010 / Published: 28 July 2010
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Abstract
Pervasive wireless systems have significantly improved end-users’ quality of life. As manufacturing costs decrease, communications bandwidth increases, and contextual information is made more readily available, the role of next generation wireless systems in facilitating users’ daily activities will grow. Unique security and [...] Read more.
Pervasive wireless systems have significantly improved end-users’ quality of life. As manufacturing costs decrease, communications bandwidth increases, and contextual information is made more readily available, the role of next generation wireless systems in facilitating users’ daily activities will grow. Unique security and privacy issues exist in these wireless, context-aware, often decentralized systems. For example, the pervasive nature of such systems allows adversaries to launch stealthy attacks against them. In this review paper, we survey several emergent personal wireless systems and their applications. These systems include mobile social networks, active implantable medical devices, and consumer products. We explore each system’s usage of contextual information and provide insight into its security vulnerabilities. Where possible, we describe existing solutions for defendingagainst these vulnerabilities. Finally, we point out promising future research directions for improving these systems’ robustness and security Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)
Open AccessArticle Survey on Wireless Sensor Network Technologies for Industrial Automation: The Security and Quality of Service Perspectives
Future Internet 2010, 2(2), 96-125; doi:10.3390/fi2020096
Received: 30 January 2010 / Revised: 19 March 2010 / Accepted: 24 March 2010 / Published: 8 April 2010
Cited by 36 | PDF Full-text (965 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are gradually adopted in the industrial world due to their advantages over wired networks. In addition to saving cabling costs, WSNs widen the realm of environments feasible for monitoring. They thus add sensing and acting capabilities to objects [...] Read more.
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are gradually adopted in the industrial world due to their advantages over wired networks. In addition to saving cabling costs, WSNs widen the realm of environments feasible for monitoring. They thus add sensing and acting capabilities to objects in the physical world and allow for communication among these objects or with services in the future Internet. However, the acceptance of WSNs by the industrial automation community is impeded by open issues, such as security guarantees and provision of Quality of Service (QoS). To examine both of these perspectives, we select and survey relevant WSN technologies dedicated to industrial automation. We determine QoS requirements and carry out a threat analysis, which act as basis of our evaluation of the current state-of-the-art. According to the results of this evaluation, we identify and discuss open research issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)
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Open AccessCommunication Selective Redundancy Removal: A Framework for Data Hiding
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 30-40; doi:10.3390/fi2010030
Received: 30 November 2009 / Revised: 4 February 2010 / Accepted: 10 February 2010 / Published: 15 February 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (85 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Data hiding techniques have so far concentrated on adding or modifying irrelevant information in order to hide a message. However, files in widespread use, such as HTML documents, usually exhibit high redundancy levels, caused by code-generation programs. Such redundancy may be removed [...] Read more.
Data hiding techniques have so far concentrated on adding or modifying irrelevant information in order to hide a message. However, files in widespread use, such as HTML documents, usually exhibit high redundancy levels, caused by code-generation programs. Such redundancy may be removed by means of optimization software. Redundancy removal, if applied selectively, enables information hiding. This work introduces Selective Redundancy Removal (SRR) as a framework for hiding data. An example application of the framework is given in terms of hiding information in HTML documents. Non-uniformity across documents may raise alarms. Nevertheless, selective application of optimization techniques might be due to the legitimate use of optimization software not supporting all the optimization methods, or configured to not use all of them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Misbehavior Scenarios in Cognitive Radio Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 212-237; doi:10.3390/fi2030212
Received: 21 June 2010 / Revised: 20 July 2010 / Accepted: 23 July 2010 / Published: 29 July 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (285 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent advances in the fields of Cognitive Radio and the proliferation of open spectrum access promise that spectrum-agile wireless communication will be widespread in the near future, and will bring significant flexibility and potential utility improvements for end users. With spectrum efficiency [...] Read more.
Recent advances in the fields of Cognitive Radio and the proliferation of open spectrum access promise that spectrum-agile wireless communication will be widespread in the near future, and will bring significant flexibility and potential utility improvements for end users. With spectrum efficiency being a key objective, most relevant research focuses on smart coexistence mechanisms. However, wireless nodes may behave selfishly and should be considered as rational autonomous entities. Selfishness, pure malice or even faulty equipment can lead to behavior that does not conform to sharing protocols and etiquette. Thus, there is a need to secure spectrum sharing mechanisms against attacks in the various phases of the sharing process. Identifying these attacks and possible countermeasures is the focus of this work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)

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