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Special Issue "Solar Cooling and Heating"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francesco Calise

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0817682301
Fax: +39 0812390364
Interests: fuel cells; solar energy; polygeneration systems; solar cooling; organic Rankine cycle; geothermal energy; solar thermal; solar heating and cooling; photovoltaic/thermal collectors; building dynamic simulations; heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems; cogeneration; energy efficiency; desalination
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Massimo Dentice d’Accadia

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0817682304
Fax: +39 0812390364
Interests: fuel cells; solar energy; polygeneration systems; solar cooling; Organic Rankine Cycle; geothermal energy; solar thermal; solar heating and cooling; photovoltaic/thermal collectors; building dynamic simulations; HVAC systems; cogeneration; energy efficiency; desalination
Guest Editor
Prof. Annamaria Buonomano

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: energy efficiency; renewable energy; dynamic simulations, modeling and simulation of innovative building-plant systems, advanced energy systems, net zero energy buildings, HVAC systems, solar heating and cooling, photovoltaic solar thermal systems, polygeneration.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solar energy is the largest and most impressive source of energy available worldwide. Unfortunately, only a small amount of solar energy potential is used. Among the available technologies, supported by global actions to improve renewable energy access, solar heating and cooling systems (SHC) are capable of greatly exploiting the solar radiation to provide building space heating and cooling all over the year. The use of energy in refrigeration can significantly reduce the growth of the electric energy demand, especially during summer.

SHC may significantly contribute to achieve the challenging goals of greenhouse gas emissions reduction, energy efficiency improvement, and increase of renewables share, as highlighted by the recent global agreements among countries regarding new national emissions targets by 2025 or 2030 (Paris, December 2015, COP21). In particular, as primary energy consumption due to space heating and cooling increase, the building sector shows a high potential of energy savings. In this regard, in order to reduce the growing primary energy consumption due to space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings, it is crucial to support more effective policies, enhancing the portfolio of solar energy technologies.

In this framework, SHC systems are very promising and show a big market potential, playing a leading role in the-long term future of our energy system. Nowadays, researchers and institution are involved in the investigation of SHC systems, focusing on several topics, such as dynamic simulations, thermal storage, heat driven chiller, thermoeconomic optimizations, exergetic analyses, experimental data, etc. Nevertheless, in order to increase the SHC market uptake, limited by the system capital cost, a significant effort in terms of research, successful demonstration projects and incentive policies are required more and more.

This Special Issue aims at collecting recent and relevant studies dealing with solar heating and cooling technology.

Prof. Francesco Calise
Prof. Massimo Dentice d’Accadia
Prof. Annamaria Buonomano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solar cooling, solar heating
  • solar collectors
  • absorption refrigeration
  • adsorption chiller
  • desiccant cooling
  • ejector cooling
  • dynamic simulations
  • experimental analyses

 

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Experimental and Numerical Analyses of a Flat Plate Photovoltaic/Thermal Solar Collector
Energies 2017, 10(4), 491; doi:10.3390/en10040491
Received: 2 February 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3468 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents a one-dimensional finite-volume model of an unglazed photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) solar collector. The unit consists of a conventional solar photovoltaic (PV) collector coupled with a suitable heat exchanger. In particular, the collector includes a roll bond heat exchanger and it is
[...] Read more.
This paper presents a one-dimensional finite-volume model of an unglazed photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) solar collector. The unit consists of a conventional solar photovoltaic (PV) collector coupled with a suitable heat exchanger. In particular, the collector includes a roll bond heat exchanger and it is not equipped with back and frame insulation. The system is discretized along the flow direction (longitudinal) of the cogenerative collector. For each finite-volume element of the discretized computational domain, mass and energy balances are implemented. The collector geometry and materials parameters are taken from a commercially available device. An on-field experimental investigation is performed in order to validate the proposed model. The model is used to evaluate both electrical and thermodynamic parameters for each element of the domain and for fixed operating conditions. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is also performed in order to investigate the energetic performance of the cogenerative collector as a function of the main design/environmental parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Cooling and Heating)
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Open AccessArticle Dynamic Simulation of a Trigeneration Scheme for Domestic Purposes Based on Hybrid Techniques
Energies 2016, 9(12), 1013; doi:10.3390/en9121013
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 November 2016 / Published: 30 November 2016
PDF Full-text (9785 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the design of a system providing electricity by coupling photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) collectors and a wind turbine (WT), sanitary hot water (SHW) coming from the PVT and evacuated tube collectors (ETCs) and fresh water (FW) produced in two seawater desalting facilities
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the design of a system providing electricity by coupling photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) collectors and a wind turbine (WT), sanitary hot water (SHW) coming from the PVT and evacuated tube collectors (ETCs) and fresh water (FW) produced in two seawater desalting facilities (membrane distillation, MD, and reverse osmosis, RO), has been carefully analyzed by means of a dynamic model developed in TRNSYS®. This analysis is compulsory to operate a lab-scale pilot plant that is being erected at Zaragoza, Spain. A new model-type has been included in TRNSYS® in order to include the MD unit in the scheme. A sensitivity analysis of some free-design variables, such that the ETC surface, PVT and ETC tilt, water storage tank, batteries capacities, and mass flow rates delivered to the SHW service and/or feeding the MD unit has been performed in order to propose the definite design of the scheme. The proposed base case was able to produce up to 15,311 L per year in the MD system and cover an electric energy demand of 1890 kWh. Coverage of SHW, water (including RO and MD) and power is respectively 99.3%, 100% and 70%. However, daily and yearly assessment of FW, SHW and power produced with the optimized design gave a better coverage of water and energy demands for a typical single family home. The improved and definite design was able to increase its MD production in 35% and the electric energy in 7% compared with base case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Cooling and Heating)
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Open AccessArticle Retrofitted Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Swedish Single-Family Houses—Evaluation of a Prototype and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis
Energies 2016, 9(11), 953; doi:10.3390/en9110953
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 7 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 15 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5852 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
According to recent technology road maps, system cost reductions and development of standardised plug-and-function systems are some of the most important goals for solar heating technology development. Retrofitting hot water boilers in single-family houses when installing solar collectors has the potential to significantly
[...] Read more.
According to recent technology road maps, system cost reductions and development of standardised plug-and-function systems are some of the most important goals for solar heating technology development. Retrofitting hot water boilers in single-family houses when installing solar collectors has the potential to significantly reduce both material and installation costs. Previous studies have investigated such retrofitting, using theoretical simulations and laboratory tests, but no actual installations were made and tested in practice. This article describes the installation, measured performance and cost effectiveness of a retrofitting solution that converts existing domestic hot water heaters to a solar domestic hot water system. The measured performance is characterised by the monthly and annual solar fractions. The cost effectiveness is evaluated by a life-cycle cost analysis, comparing the retrofitted system to a conventional solar domestic hot water system and the case without any solar heating system. Measurements showed that approximately 50% of the 5000 kWh/year of domestic hot water consumption was saved by the retrofitted system in south Sweden. Such savings are in agreement with previous estimations and are comparable to the energy savings when using a conventional solar domestic hot water system. The life-cycle cost analysis showed that, according to the assumptions and given climate, the return on investment of the retrofitted system is approximately 17 years, while a conventional system does not reach profitability during its lifetime of 25 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Cooling and Heating)
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Open AccessArticle Control Optimization of Solar Thermally Driven Chillers
Energies 2016, 9(11), 864; doi:10.3390/en9110864
Received: 3 August 2016 / Revised: 13 September 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many installed solar thermally driven cooling systems suffer from high auxiliary electric energy consumption which makes them not more efficient than conventional compression cooling systems. A main reason for this is the use of non-efficient controls with constant set points that do not
[...] Read more.
Many installed solar thermally driven cooling systems suffer from high auxiliary electric energy consumption which makes them not more efficient than conventional compression cooling systems. A main reason for this is the use of non-efficient controls with constant set points that do not allow a chiller power modulation at partial-load and therefore lead to unnecessary high power consumption of the parasitics. The aims of this paper are to present a method to control efficiently solar thermally driven chillers, to demonstrate experimentally its applicability and to quantify the benefits. It has been shown that the cooling capacity of a diffusion absorption chiller can be modulated very effectively by adjusting both the temperature and the flow rate of the cooling water. With the developed approach and the use of optimization algorithms, both the temperature and the flow rate can be controlled simultaneously in a way that the cooling load is matched and the electricity consumption is minimized. Depending on the weather and operating conditions, electricity savings between 20% and 60% can be achieved compared to other tested control approaches. The highest savings are obtained when the chiller is operated at partial load. The presented method is not restricted to solar cooling systems and can also be applied to other conventional heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Cooling and Heating)
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Open AccessArticle CFD Analysis on the Thermal Hydraulic Performance of an SAH Duct with Multi V-Shape Roughened Ribs
Energies 2016, 9(6), 415; doi:10.3390/en9060415
Received: 31 March 2016 / Revised: 11 May 2016 / Accepted: 19 May 2016 / Published: 28 May 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (14421 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study presents the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in a rib-roughened SAH (solar air heater) channel. The artificial roughness of the rectangular channel was in the form of a thin circular wire in discrete multi V-pattern rib geometries. The effect of
[...] Read more.
This study presents the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in a rib-roughened SAH (solar air heater) channel. The artificial roughness of the rectangular channel was in the form of a thin circular wire in discrete multi V-pattern rib geometries. The effect of this geometry on heat transfer, fluid flow, and performance augmentation was investigated using the CFD (computational fluid dynamics). The roughness parameters were a relative discrete distance of 0.69, a relative rib height of 0.043, a relative rib pitch of 10, a relative rib width of 6.0, and a flow-attack-angle of 60°. The discrete width ratios and Reynolds numbers ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 and from 2000 to 20,000, respectively. The CFD results using the renormalization k-epsilon model were in good agreement with the empirical relationship. This model was used to investigate the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in the multi V-pattern rib roughened SAH channel. The thermo-hydraulic performance was found to be the best for the discrete width ratio of 1.0. A discrete multi V-pattern rib combined with dimple staggered ribs also had better overall thermal performance compared to other rib shapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Cooling and Heating)
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