Special Issue "UAV Propulsion"

A special issue of Drones (ISSN 2504-446X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Leonid Tartakovsky

Technion Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: advanced propulsion systems; combustion in internal combustion engines; internal combustion engines for UAV; alternative fuels; fuel atomization; energy and environmental impacts of vehicles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We cordially invite you to submit original and unpublished research work or recommend papers, to be published in a Special Issue of Drones devoted to drone propulsion systems. Use of unmanned aerial vehicles/systems or drones has been expanding dramatically in the last few decades. Drone applications include: Search and rescue operations; traffic monitoring; archeological surveying; environmental studies and meteorology; various security-related tasks, like surveillance, crowd monitoring and control; firefighting; healthcare, including medical supplies delivery; commercial delivery; farming; pipeline and oil rig inspections; extensive military usage; and many other applications. The exponential development of drones is anticipated to continue in the forthcoming decade, with a growth of worldwide spending on UAVs from approximately four billion USD in 2015 toward 14 billion USD in 2024.

Propulsion system is a heart of the drone. It defines drone survivability, endurance and other parameters crucial for UAV. Between the main requirements to UAV propulsion systems, one can mention reliability because propulsion system failure inevitably leads to UAV loss; low fuel consumption, which allows minimizing the drone weight at take-off and climbing or increasing the flight endurance; low weight and compact design of the system that enable more payload; and low noise level to avoid a possibility of on-land undesired alert. The propulsion system should allow also a convenient drone climbing to high flight altitudes without power loss. A necessity to meet these requirements, as well as the special needs of specific applications, result in numerous technological and scientific challenges. This imposes a need for intensive research on UAV propulsion, which is constantly progressing and expanding.

This Special Issue of Drones seeks high-quality research papers on all aspects of UAV propulsion. Topics of primary interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Methods of energy conversion for UAV propulsion,
  • Two- and four-stroke IC engines,
  • Rotary engines,
  • Alternative propulsion methods and schemes,
  • Electric and hybrid propulsion,
  • Engine-platform/propeller matching,
  • Conventional and alternative fuels for UAV engines,
  • Future development trends, etc.

Original research, review and case study articles can be submitted.

Dr. Leonid Tartakovsky
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Drones is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Numerical Study of a Direct Injection Internal Combustion Engine Burning a Blend of Hydrogen and Dimethyl Ether
Received: 24 June 2018 / Revised: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
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Abstract
In the reported study, various aspects of dimethyl ether/hydrogen combustion in a Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine are numerically evaluated using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Early direct injection and mixture propagation were also explored, along with peculiaritis
[...] Read more.
In the reported study, various aspects of dimethyl ether/hydrogen combustion in a Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine are numerically evaluated using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Early direct injection and mixture propagation were also explored, along with peculiaritis of dimethyl ether combustion modeling. The numerical models are validated using available experimental results of a partially premixed dimethyl ether jet flames and an optically accessible internal combustion engine with direct hydrogen injection. LES showed more predictive results in modeling both combustion and mixture propagation. The same models were applied to a full engine cycle of an RCCI engine with stratified reactivity, to gain phenomenological insight into the physical processes involved in stratified reactivity combustion. We showed that 3D and turbulence considerations had a great impact on simulation results, and the LES was able to capture the pressure oscillations typical for this type of combustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue UAV Propulsion)
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Open AccessArticle Powerplant Reliability Issues and Wear Monitoring in Aircraft Piston Engines. Part II: Engine Diagnostic
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 15 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 6 March 2018
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Abstract
This paper introduces a method to efficiently monitor the status of a piston engine during flight. ECUs (Electronic Control Units) make it possible to fly safely without emergencies or urgencies with random electronic failures of components and connections. The same can be easily
[...] Read more.
This paper introduces a method to efficiently monitor the status of a piston engine during flight. ECUs (Electronic Control Units) make it possible to fly safely without emergencies or urgencies with random electronic failures of components and connections. The same can be easily done on older engines by adding a reliable digital monitoring system and an automated calibration of the carburetors. In fact, their reliability is several order of magnitude inferior to modern turboshafts. In modern engines with FADEC (Full Authority Digital Electronic Control) as the “on” button is pressed the sensors and actuators are checked. The CPUs will then run start-up during the cranking phase (engine running without ignition). If everything is all right, then the engine starts and the post start checks are also performed. During flight, the ECU checks CPUs, sensors and actuators. Therefore, the electronic system can be monitored with high reliability without much effort. The sensors may crosscheck the engine situation and may output very reliable early diagnosis of incoming failures. Statistical data on spare parts are invaluable for monitoring application, signaling weak or not-lasting components and failure modes. This is another advantage of automotive piston engines conversions to aircraft use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue UAV Propulsion)
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