Special Issue "Pediatric Dentistry 2018"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christopher V. Hughes

School of Dentistry, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Identification of children at risk is the most pressing   research question in modern Pediatric Dentistry. Risk assessment enables the clinician to tailor preventive, restorative, and diagnostic strategies for each patient based on biologic, environmental, and demographic risk factors. 

Dental caries is a complex multifactorial disease, and hence, identification of risk factors has proved a daunting task. Recent decades have focused on the demographic, nutritional, environmental, and microbiologic factors that influence the experience of caries in children.  Recently, with the advent of the genomic era, research has begun to focus on possible genetic influences as well. These studies suggest that susceptibility to caries is highly heritable, and genetics may also play an important role in risk assessment. 

The focus of this Special Issue will be on all areas of caries risk assessment, including genetic, microbiological, environmental, behavioral, and demographic factors. Papers focusing on conservative approaches to disease management are also encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Christopher V. Hughes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • risk assessment
  • dental caries
  • Mutans streptococci
  • genetics
  • nutrition
  • pediatric dentistry
  • early childhood caries
  • prevention
  • oral hygiene

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessCase Report Treating Mucocele in Pediatric Patients Using a Diode Laser: Three Case Reports
Dent. J. 2018, 6(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6020013
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 23 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 9 May 2018
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Abstract
A mucocele is the most common minor salivary gland disease and among the most common biopsied oral lesions in pediatric patients. Clinically, a mucocele appears as a round well-circumscribed painless swelling ranging from deep blue to mucosa alike in color. Mucoceles rarely resolve
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A mucocele is the most common minor salivary gland disease and among the most common biopsied oral lesions in pediatric patients. Clinically, a mucocele appears as a round well-circumscribed painless swelling ranging from deep blue to mucosa alike in color. Mucoceles rarely resolve on their own and surgical removal under local anesthesia is required in most cases. Different treatment options are described in the literature, including cryosurgery, intra-lesion injection of corticosteroid, micro-marsupialization and conventional surgical removal using a scalpel, and laser ablation. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to report three cases of mucocele removal in pediatric patients using a diode laser with a one-month follow-up. Mucoceles were removed by a pediatric dentist using a diode laser with a wavelength of 930 nm in continuous mode and a power setting of 1.8 Watts. In all cases, no bleeding occurred during or after the procedure and there was no need for suturing. On clinical examination during the one-month follow-up, in all three cases there was minimal or no scarring, minimal post-operative discomfort or pain, and no recurrence. Diode lasers provide an effective, rapid, simple, bloodless and well accepted procedure for treating mucocele in pediatric patients. Minimal post-operative discomfort and scarring was reported by all the three patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Dentistry 2018)
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