Special Issue "III-V and II-VI Compound Semiconductor Nanorods: Growth, Properties and Applications"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chua Soo-Jin

1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore
Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore
3. SMART-LEES, 1 CREATE Way, #10-01 Create Tower, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: epitaxial growth of compound semiconductors by MOCVD and MBE; optoelectronic devices: LEDs, semiconductor lasers and HEMTs; quantum effect semiconductor devices; semiconductor heterojunctions; semiconductor epitaxial film defects; semiconductor nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties that are different from those of bulk materials. They arise from the restriction of charge carrier motions to lower dimensionality in the form of quantum dots, quantum rods or wires, and quantum wells, leading to modification in the density of states. Discrete energy levels are formed, which modify carrier transport and optical emissions.

Many of the new properties are being exploited to enhance the electrical and optical performance of devices, such as LEDs, semiconductor lasers, transistors, and sensors. This Special Issue focuses on nanowires and nanorods formed from III-V and II-VI compound semiconductors. A great deal of progress has been made to control their morphologies, but they have yet to demonstrate their superior performance in commercial products.

We invite researchers to submit papers or reviews that discuss on the various aspects of nanorods or nanowires listed below:

  • Growth techniques: Spontaneous and through templates using various forms of epitaxy, such as MBE, MOCVD, physical vapor transport, aqueous solution, PLD, and magnetron sputtering.
  • Nanowires and nanorods morphology: Control on size and shape distributions, such as flat top or pointed tips
  • Core-shell and other heterojunctions
  • Crystal defects: High resolution TEM and nanostructural analyses
  • Characterization: stress, composition gradient and band alignment by XRD, XPS and BEEM
  • Optical properties: photoluminescence and electroluminescence
  • Electrical properties: carrier mobility and carrier density
  • Applications: LEDs, semiconductor lasers, transistors and sensors

Prof. Dr. Chua Soo-Jin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Crystal growth
  • Crystal defect
  • Heterojunctions
  • Quantum effects
  • Luminescence property
  • LEDs
  • Semiconductor lasers
  • Transistors
  • Sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle The Role of III-V Substrate Roughness and Deoxidation Induced by Digital Etch in Achieving Low Resistance Metal Contacts
Crystals 2017, 7(6), 177; doi:10.3390/cryst7060177
Received: 2 May 2017 / Revised: 2 June 2017 / Accepted: 13 June 2017 / Published: 19 June 2017
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Abstract
To achieve low contact resistance between metal and III-V material, transmission-line-model (TLM) structures of molybdenum (Mo) were fabricated on indium phosphide (InP) substrate on the top of an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The contact layer was prepared
[...] Read more.
To achieve low contact resistance between metal and III-V material, transmission-line-model (TLM) structures of molybdenum (Mo) were fabricated on indium phosphide (InP) substrate on the top of an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The contact layer was prepared using a digital etch procedure before metal deposition. The contact resistivity was found to decrease significantly with the cleaning process. High Resolution Transmission & Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRTEM & HRSTEM) investigations revealed that the surface roughness of treated samples was increased. Further analysis of the metal-semiconductor interface using Energy Electron Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) showed that the amount of oxides (InxOy, GaxOy or AsxOy) was significantly decreased for the etched samples. These results suggest that the low contact resistance obtained after digital etching is attributed to the combined effects of the induced surface roughness and oxides removal during the digital etch process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Epitaxial Defects in Nanoscale InP Fin Structures Revealed by Wet-Chemical Etching
Crystals 2017, 7(4), 98; doi:10.3390/cryst7040098
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 10 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
PDF Full-text (5205 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we report on wet-chemical defect revealing in InP fin structures relevant for device manufacturing. Both HCl and HBr solutions were explored using bulk InP as a reference. A distinct difference in pit morphology was observed between the two acids, attributed
[...] Read more.
In this work, we report on wet-chemical defect revealing in InP fin structures relevant for device manufacturing. Both HCl and HBr solutions were explored using bulk InP as a reference. A distinct difference in pit morphology was observed between the two acids, attributed to an anisotropy in step edge reactivity. The morphology of the etch pits in bulk InP suggests that the dislocations are oriented mainly perpendicular to the surface. By studying the influence of the acid concentration on the InP fin recess in nanoscale trenches, it was found that aqueous HCl solution was most suitable for revealing defects. Planar defects in InP fin structures grown by the aspect ratio trapping technique could be visualized as characteristic shallow grooves approximately one nanometer deep. It is challenging to reveal defects in wide-field InP fins. In these structures, dislocations also reach the surface next to stack faults or twinning planes. Due to the inclined nature, dislocation-related pits are only a few atomic layers deep. Extending the pits is limited by the high reactivity of the fin sides and the strong surface roughening during etching. The process window for revealing wet-chemical defects in InP fins is limited. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Heterojunctions Based on II-VI Compound Semiconductor One-Dimensional Nanostructures and Their Optoelectronic Applications
Crystals 2017, 7(10), 307; doi:10.3390/cryst7100307
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Abstract
Wide band gap II-VI semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively studied according to their great potentials for optoelectronic applications, while heterojunctions are fundamental elements for modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. Subsequently, a great deal of achievements in construction and optoelectronic applications of heterojunctions based
[...] Read more.
Wide band gap II-VI semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively studied according to their great potentials for optoelectronic applications, while heterojunctions are fundamental elements for modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. Subsequently, a great deal of achievements in construction and optoelectronic applications of heterojunctions based on II-VI compound semiconductor one-dimensional nanostructures have been obtained in the past decade. Herein, we present a review of a series of progress in this field. First, construction strategies towards different types of heterojunctions are reviewed, including core-shell heterojunctions, one-dimensional axial heterojunctions, crossed nanowires heterojunctions, and one-dimensional nanostructure/thin film or Si substrate heterojunctions. Secondly, optoelectronic applications of these constructed heterojunctions, such as photodetectors, solar cells, light emitting diodes, junction field effect transistors, etc., are discussed briefly. This review shows that heterojunctions based on II-VI compound semiconductor 1-D nanostructures have great potential for future optoelectronic applications. Full article
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